Category: Health News

Cannabis legalization will increase injuries

Albertans can expect to see increases in injury rates—including traffic fatalities, child poisonings and burns—when Canada legalizes recreational cannabis use this year, according to a report prepared by University of Alberta’s Injury Prevention Centre. “We’d like to see the government raise more awareness around the injury risks of trying cannabis,” said Kathy Belton, associate director

In-depth genomic analysis of 33 cancer types

Researchers funded by the National Institutes of Health have completed a detailed genomic analysis, known as the PanCancer Atlas, on a data set of molecular and clinical information from over 10,000 tumors representing 33 types of cancer. “This project is the culmination of more than a decade of groundbreaking work,” said NIH Director Francis S.

New actors identified in atherosclerosis

Atherosclerosis is the most common cause of death and disease in the Western world. In Germany, about 300,000 people each year suffer a heart attack and some 270,000 a stroke as a result of the condition. Atherosclerosis is estimated to be responsible for a little more than half of all deaths in these countries. Searching

New guidance for safe opioid prescribing for hospitalized patients with acute pain: 16 recommendations for improving safe use of opioids in noncancer patients during and after hospital stay stress limiting use, educating patients

For hospitalized patients, pain is an all-too-common part of the experience. Even among U.S. patients who have not undergone surgery, more than half receive at least one dose of an opioid for acute pain during their stay. Even as current research demonstrates that hospitalized patients’ exposure to opioids has contributed to the nationwide addiction epidemic,

Polypharmacy linked to poorer cognitive, physical capability

(HealthDay)—Polypharmacy is associated with poorer cognitive and physical capability even after adjustment for disease burden, according to a study published online March 24 in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society. Mark James Rawle, M.B.Ch.B., from University College London, and colleagues conducted a prospective birth cohort study to examine longitudinal correlations between polypharmacy and cognitive

Clues for improved influenza vaccine design

Influenza vaccines that better target the influenza surface protein called neuraminidase (NA) could offer broad protection against various influenza virus strains and lessen the severity of illness, according to new research published in Cell. Current seasonal influenza vaccines mainly target a different, more abundant influenza surface protein called hemagglutinin (HA). However, because influenza vaccines offer

Ideal Image Reveals Its New Look

Ideal Image’s new look announced last year is coming to life. The 130-plus location med spa best known for its laser hair removal services is stamping out upgraded signage, fresh decor and expanded services in its advanced medspas across the U.S. and Canada. The efforts coalesce as the nation’s biggest medical spa provider hopes to

Genetic link to IBS identified in women

New research coordinated by Karolinska Institutet in Sweden links certain DNA variants to increased risk of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) in women. The findings, published in the scientific journal Gastroenterology, might help explain why IBS is more common in women than in men. Irritable bowel syndrome is the most common gastrointestinal disorder. More than 10

School lunch decisions made by the child and not the parent: Child’s enjoyment of packed lunch was primary motivation for parent’s acceptance of food choices, according to a new study

While school lunches in the UK are subject to food standards, the contents of packed lunches are not as closely scrutinized, and studies have raised concern regarding the nutritional quality of packed lunches. A new study published in the Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior found that children, not their parents, are often the primary

Like babies, eggs send signals when ‘hungry’

In humans and other mammals, the female reproductive cells – the eggs or oocytes – need nourishment in order to grow and remain fertile. It is known that the egg gets its food from little arm-like feeding tubes (called filopodia) that jut out from tiny cells surrounding the egg and must poke through a thick

New Jersey fines Virtua Medical $418,000 for HIPAA breach

The New Jersey Attorney General fined Virtua Medical Group for more than $418,000 after a misconfigured database breached the protected information of 1,654 patients in January 2016. 1,617 of those patients resided in the Garden State. The attorney general found that Virtua failed to conduct a thorough analysis of the risk to the confidentiality of

Those living near oil and gas facilities may be at higher risk of disease

People living near oil and gas facilities along Colorado’s Northern Front Range may be exposed to hazardous air pollutants, including carcinogens like benzene, that could pose health risks above levels deemed acceptable by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, according to researchers at the Colorado School of Public Health, Boulder County Public Health, CU Boulder, the

In-depth genomic analysis of 33 cancer types

Researchers funded by the National Institutes of Health have completed a detailed genomic analysis, known as the PanCancer Atlas, on a data set of molecular and clinical information from over 10,000 tumors representing 33 types of cancer. “This project is the culmination of more than a decade of groundbreaking work,” said NIH Director Francis S.

Juvederm Voluma XC feasible for correcting infraorbital hollows

(HealthDay)—Juvéderm Voluma XC is feasible and seems safe for correcting infraorbital hollows, according to a study published online April 5 in JAMA Facial Plastic Surgery. Michael B. Hall, M.D., from the Buckingham Center for Facial Plastic Surgery in Austin, Texas, and colleagues conducted a retrospective observational study involving patients aged 21 to 85 years who