Category: Health News

Kidney Failure Patients Face Higher Risk of Cancer Death

THURSDAY, Feb. 14, 2019 — Patients with kidney failure who are on dialysis or have received a transplant have a sharply higher risk of dying from cancer, Australian researchers report. In fact, compared with people who don’t have kidney failure, they have more than double the odds of cancer death. The odds are particularly high

Science Puzzling Out Differences in Gut Bacteria Around the World

THURSDAY, Feb. 14, 2019 — Scientists say nearly 2,000 previously unknown types of bacteria in the human gut have been identified. The human gut hosts many species of microbes, collectively referred to as the gut microbiota. Scientists are working to identify the individual species and understand the roles they play in human health. While investigators

Tick tock: Commitment readiness predicts relationship success

Timing is everything, goes a popular phrase, and this is also true for relationships. As Valentine’s Day approaches, social psychologists from Purdue University offer new research showing that a person’s commitment readiness is a good predictor of relationship success. The results are published in Social Psychological and Personality Science. “Feeling ready leads to better relational

Coeliac disease can cause irreversible changes to immune cells

Immune cells in the bowel of people who suffer with coeliac disease are permanently replaced by a new subset of cells that promote inflammation, suggests a new study involving researchers at Cardiff University. This permanent ‘immunological scarring’ lays the foundation for the disease to progress and could have long-term implications for gut health in affected

Elements of gameplay are potential new tools in surgical resident education

Researchers at the University of Alabama at Birmingham have published a study in the peer-reviewed medical journal Laryngoscope exploring the merits of integrating gamification into the graduate medical education curriculum. “With gamification, we take aspects of gaming and put it in a learning software,” said senior author Do-Yeon Cho, M.D., director of Otolaryngology Research in

Weed killer the risk for cancer increase by 41 percent

Glyphosate herbicides cause an increased risk of cancer? Certain means of combating weeds don’t seem to damage only the pesky weeds, but also to human health. Doctors found out now, that so-called glyphosate herbicides, the most commonly used weed killer all over the world, in people with a high exposure to a 41 percent increased

Health Tip: Treating Dry Eye

— Dry eye syndrome occurs when your eyes do not make enough tears. As adults get older, they are more likely to have medical conditions that trigger dry eye, such as autoimmune diseases, diabetes, stroke and thyroid problems, the AARP says. Certain medications also may affect tear glands’ ability to function properly. AARP suggests how

These four complaints indicate prostate cancer

What are the symptoms that indicate a change in the prostate? Prostate cancer is the most common cancer in men. Every year, around 60,000 new cases occur. According to information of the German cancer society every fourth Tumor in men develops in the prostate. Approximately 10 percent of the cases end fatally. Thus, the prostate

Noise in NIGHTCLUBS should be limited so millennials don’t go deaf

World Health Organisation wants to limit noise levels in NIGHTCLUBS to stop millennials going deaf 466million people have debilitating hearing loss, up from 360million in 2010  Figure expected to nearly double to 900million, or one in 10 people, by 2050  World Health Organisation warn of a hearing loss timebomb among millennials  The World Health Organization

How to not get sick: 8 ways to avoid colds and the flu

Although most cold and flu infections occur during the fall and winter seasons, the viruses responsible for these illnesses are present year-round. Fighting off a viral infection takes its toll on most people, causing them to miss days at work and valuable time with their friends and families. In this article, we describe eight evidence-based

Balanced reporting of sports head injuries

A group of more than 60 leading international neuroscientists, including Mark Herceg, PhD, a neuropsychologist at Northwell Health’s Phelps Hospital in Sleepy Hollow, NY, and a member of The Feinstein Institute for Medical Research, published a correspondence today in The Lancet Neurology, asking for balance when reporting on sports-related injury chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). CTE

New tuberculosis drug may shorten treatment time for patients

A new experimental antibiotic for tuberculosis has been shown to be more effective against TB than isoniazid, a decades-old drug which is currently one of the standard treatments. In mouse studies, the new drug showed a much lower tendency to develop resistance, and it remains in the tissues where the Mycobacterium tuberculosis bacteria reside for

More is better when coordinating with others

Researchers at Tokyo Institute of Technology, Imperial College London and the University of Tokyo have demonstrated that physical coordination is more beneficial in larger groups. The researchers used robotic interfaces to test coordination in groups of two, three and four partners, and found that performance was improving with every additional group member. The researchers believe

New dangerous side effects with the popular painkiller Ibuprofen found

Ibuprofen for men is more dangerous than for women? Ibuprofen is one of the most popular and commonly used pain relievers. It is available without prescription and is used against numerous ailments. Is unthinkingly dealing with the pain means? An international research team uncovered recently, previously unknown side effects during long-term use. Apparently, the drug

Ebola death toll tops 500 in DRC with nearly 100 CHILDREN killed

Ebola death toll tops 500 in Democratic Republic of the Congo with nearly 100 CHILDREN killed by the devastating virus The second worst outbreak in history has ravaged the country since August Expected to continue into middle of the year at least, according to aid workers Thousands of vaccinations administered to neighbouring countries on high

Rates of Diabetes Screening High Among Adults Age ≥45

MONDAY, Feb. 11, 2019 — Rates of diabetes screening are high, with hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) used less but more likely to result in clinical diagnosis, according to a study published online Feb. 6 in Diabetes Care. Joshua M. Evron, M.D., from the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor, and colleagues examined changes in screening among