Category: Health News

Scientists unlock path to use cell’s own nanoparticles as disease biomarkers: Extracellular vesicles can now be identified at the individual level

Researchers at the University of Sydney have established a method to identify individual nanoparticles released by human cells, opening the way for them to become diagnostic tools in the early-detection of cancers, dementia and kidney disease. The particles, known as extracellular vesicles, or EVs, are routinely released by cells and play a central role in

Overeating? It may be a brain glitch

With springtime comes the desire to shed those few extra pounds, in preparation to don swimsuits and head to the pool. This year, new obesity research is making it easier to find a pathway that is right for us. There is no doubt that weight loss is a higher priority than ever before. Americans have

Scientists discover a role for ‘junk’ DNA

Researchers at the University of Michigan Life Sciences Institute and the Howard Hughes Medical Institute have determined how satellite DNA, considered to be “junk DNA,” plays a crucial role in holding the genome together. Their findings, published recently in the journal eLife, indicate that this genetic “junk” performs the vital function of ensuring that chromosomes

The secret to being cool: Try smiling

For many people, one of the unspoken rules for being cool is maintaining an emotionally inexpressive attitude. This message is reinforced through advertisements where fashion models rarely smile and by quotes from celebrities. In an article in the Huffington Post, Kanye West said he doesn’t smile in photographs because “it just wouldn’t look as cool.”

Doctors evaluate 4 popular trends in dieting

Thinking of trying that trendy diet your friends raved about on Instagram? Before you’re ready to declare the latest celebrity fad the best diet plan, check the science first. While many diets promise quick weight loss, they often have a downside. We asked two USC experts to help us separate truth from hype for four

Geisinger execs: DNA sequencing program saving patient lives

Geisinger Health System CEO David Fineberg, MD, and other top executives said Geisinger’s gene sequencing program is helping to better project adverse health issues in the short-term and the hospital is expecting even better results to come. Geisinger’s DNA sequencing project has the potential to identify virtually everyone in its patient population to pinpoint increased

Genetic variant might be a better marker for heart disease

Researchers at the University of Cincinnati (UC) College of Medicine have found that a newly identified subset of a known genetic variant found primarily in individuals of South Asian descent may be a better marker for carriers of heart dysfunction in this population and that individuals with this genetic variant are more likely to develop

Humans and others exposed to prenatal stress have high stress levels after birth

Vertebrate species, including humans, exposed to stress prenatally tend to have higher stress hormones after birth, according to a new Dartmouth-led study published in Scientific Reports. While previous research has reported examples of maternal stress experience predicting offspring stress hormones in different species, this study is the first to empirically demonstrate the impact of prenatal

New study advocates for better information about PET/CT scanning

Improved information before undergoing PET/CT scanning can improve patients’ experience of care, demonstrates radiology nurse Camilla Andersson in a recent dissertation at Uppsala University. PET/CT scanning is increasingly common for various oncological matters, but it also requires care recipients to understand and follow instructions. Unprepared patients may entail delayed exams and postponed treatment, which can

First dynamic spine brace — robotic spine exoskeleton — characterizes spine deformities: Designed by Columbia Engineers, RoSE is first device to measure 3-D stiffness of human torso, could lead to new treatments for children with spine deformities such as idiopathic scoliosis and kyphosis

Spine deformities, such as idiopathic scoliosis and kyphosis (also known as “hunchback”), are characterized by an abnormal curvature in the spine. The children with these spinal deformities are typically advised to wear a brace that fits around the torso and hips to correct the abnormal curve. Bracing has been shown to prevent progression of the

State Department puts out RFI for a new EHR

The U.S. Department of State has released a request for information for a new electronic health record last week, stemming from a failed joint EHR implementation with the Coast Guard. The Coast Guard had attempted to share a hosted EHR with the State Department, known as the Integrated Health Information System, or IHiS. But the

Later school start times really do improve sleep time

The study aimed to investigate the short and longer-term impact of a 45-min delay in school start time on sleep and well-being of adolescents. Singapore leads the world in the Programme for International Student Assessment rankings, which measures international scholastic performance in 15-year-olds. East Asian students live in a culture where the importance of academic

Americans world’s biggest TV addicts, watching four hours a day

The average person around the world spent nearly three hours a day in front their television last year, according to a report released Monday. Eurodata TV Worldwide said that television viewing was holding up despite more and more people watching online platforms like Netflix and Amazon. Americans and Canadians are the biggest TV addicts, said

Practicing Tai Chi helps improve respiratory function in patients with COPD: Tai Chi offers a low-cost, easily accessible alternative to pulmonary rehabilitation, study finds

Finding ways to help patients with COPD improve their functional status is an area of interest for pulmonary healthcare providers. Currently, pulmonary rehabilitation (PR) is used where available to improve exercise capacity and quality of life, but the treatment requires access to trained staff and specialized facilities. A new study in the journal CHEST® looked

Cannabis legalization will increase injuries

Albertans can expect to see increases in injury rates—including traffic fatalities, child poisonings and burns—when Canada legalizes recreational cannabis use this year, according to a report prepared by University of Alberta’s Injury Prevention Centre. “We’d like to see the government raise more awareness around the injury risks of trying cannabis,” said Kathy Belton, associate director

In-depth genomic analysis of 33 cancer types

Researchers funded by the National Institutes of Health have completed a detailed genomic analysis, known as the PanCancer Atlas, on a data set of molecular and clinical information from over 10,000 tumors representing 33 types of cancer. “This project is the culmination of more than a decade of groundbreaking work,” said NIH Director Francis S.