Category: Health News

Top 5 reasons you should go on a social media detox

Nowadays, we have plenty of social networking sites to choose from, and the options seem to be ever expanding. Many people actually hold multiple accounts, which they may use for different purposes. I, for one, use one platform to communicate with friends and family, and another to stay up to date with the most recent

New protein may help to catch lung cancer early

Lung cancer is the second most prevalent form of cancer in men and women and the top cancer killer among both sexes. The American Cancer Society (ACS) estimate that in 2018, 154,050 people in the United States will have died from the disease. The World Health Organization (WHO) suggest that 1.69 million deaths are brought

New molecule may stop Alzheimer’s from spreading

A brain protein called tau is known to play a key role in the development of Alzheimer’s disease. Our brain cells have a “transport system” made of straight, parallel “roads,” along which food molecules, nutrients, and discarded parts of cells can travel. In a healthy brain, the protein tau helps these tracks to stay straight.

Baking soda: A safe, easy treatment for arthritis?

Baking soda, also called sodium bicarbonate, is a kitchen staple commonly used as a raising agent for cakes. That being said, it has also made a name for itself as a home remedy for various conditions. Half a teaspoon of baking soda is often taken to ease heartburn or acid reflux, for example, and this

Alcoholic Drinks Kill Good Mouth Bacteria but Leave the Bad

A new study found the mouths of drinkers contained more bad bacteria that potentially cause disease. There’s no lack of evidence that drinking too much alcohol is bad for you. But here’s one more reason to cut down: teeth. A recent article published in Microbiome last month found, in a large study of American adults,

Virtual reality technology opens new doors of (spatial) perception: Using immersive technology in the lab has enabled researchers to study sound perception in realistic settings

We rely on our ears to tell us where sounds — from the chirp of a bird to the call of your name in a crowd — are coming from. Locating and discriminating sound sources is extremely complex because the brain has to process spatial information from many, sometimes conflicting, cues. Using virtual reality and

New research shows how Indo-European languages spread across Asia

A new study has discovered that horses were first domesticated by descendants of hunter-gatherer groups in Kazakhstan who left little direct trace in the ancestry of modern populations. The research sheds new light on the long-standing “steppe theory” on the origin and movement of Indo-European languages made possible by the domestication of the horse. The

From the mouths of babes: Infants really enjoy hearing from their peers: An attraction to vocal sounds from infants may help build spoken language skills in infancy

Sorry, new moms and dads — even though your infants really do appreciate your squeaky coos, they would prefer to hear sounds from their peers — other babies. Even at the pre-babbling stage — before they can form sounds resembling syllables like “ba ba ba” — infants recognize vowel-like sounds, but they tend to dwell

This SI Swim Model Shared a Powerful Post About Going From a Size 2 to a Size 8 and Overcoming Her Eating Disorder

Mia Kang doesn’t hold back. The former Sports Illustrated swimsuit model and professional Muay Thai fighter has been open about her past struggles with anorexia and bulimia. Just last year, Kang told Health that she had previously binged and purged and also abused laxatives as a young model striving for the “perfect” body.  All that changed when she discovered Muay

Antidepressants are an 'under-treatment': US expert

According to a 2017 OECD report, roughly one in ten Australians use antidepressants. The same report found antidepressant use in Australia doubled between 2000 and 2015. These statistics give Australians the distinction of being the second-highest users of antidepressants in the world, coming in behind only Iceland. Roughly one in ten Australians use antidepressants. It

New study demonstrates toll of anxiety on bone health

Anxiety has already been shown to take its toll on the human body in many ways, including increased risk for heart disease and gastrointestinal disorders. Now a new study demonstrates how anxiety levels are linked to an increased risk of bone fractures in postmenopausal women. Study results are published online today in Menopause, the journal