Category: Health News

IgG antibodies activate blood platelets and contribute to the severity of anaphylaxis

The most severe allergic reaction, anaphylaxis (or anaphylactic shock), is the result of an inappropriate immune reaction following the introduction of a usually harmless antigen into the body. The production of antibodies against this antigen (or allergen) allows the formation of antibody-antigen complexes that trigger a massive secretion of potent mediators, resulting in organ failure,

Exercising in the great outdoors

(HealthDay)—Outdoor exercise can be invigorating and a great morale booster. But always take a few simple steps to stay safe, no matter the season. For starters, dress for the weather. Whether it’s cold or hot, that usually involves layering so you can start off warm and peel off layers as you heat up. In warm

National trial: EEG brain tests help patients overcome depression

Imagine millions of depressed Americans getting their brain activity measured and undergoing blood tests to determine which antidepressant would work best. Imagine some of them receiving “brain training” or magnetic stimulation to make their brains more amenable to those treatments. A national research trial initiated by UT Southwestern in 2012 is generating the first set

Magnetic stimulation dampens brain response to drug cues in addiction

In a study investigating the use of transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) for drug addiction, researchers at Medical University of South Carolina are the first to demonstrate that the noninvasive brain stimulation technique can dampen brain activity in response to drug cues in chronic alcohol users and chronic cocaine users. The findings are published in Biological

Researchers study ‘universal’ protective human antibodies

Scientists from the German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ) have been studying how the immune system succeeds in keeping pathogens in check. For the first time, the researchers have now discovered antibodies that are capable of disarming not only one specific bacterium, but a whole variety of microorganisms at once. The newly discovered antibodies recognize a

Preparing for the ‘silver tsunami’: Law professor suggests how to address nation’s looming health-care and economic crisis caused by surging baby-boom population

Skyrocketing drug prices and the looming insolvency of Social Security and Medicare are just two of many pressing issues caused by America’s surging baby-boom population, often referred to as the “Silver Tsunami.” What can be done about it? In a recent article published in The Elder Law Journal, Sharona Hoffman, the Edgar A. Hahn Professor

How job strain may impair mental health

Mental health problems are more common than we might think. The National Institutes of Mental Health (NIMH) estimate that 16.2 million people in the United States have experienced major depression at least once in the past year. Depression is considered the leading cause of workplace absenteeism in the U.S., as well as the leading cause

Scientists uncover brain circuits behind putting up a fight or freezing in place: Study may provide clues to disorders including anxiety and phobias

In a study of mice, National Institutes of Health-funded researchers describe a new circuit involved in fine-tuning the brain’s decision either to hide or confront threats. The study, published in Nature, was partially funded by the NIH’s Brain Research through Advancing Innovative Neurotechnologies (BRAIN) Initiative. “Being able to manipulate specific circuits can uncover surprising relationships

Australian stores limit baby formula as China demand hits stocks

One of Australia’s biggest supermarket chains said Wednesday some stores were moving baby formula behind counters and restricting sales as it emerged customers were clearing shelves and selling it online in China for more than double the price. Coles’ decision to take the milk product off aisles follows complaints from worried mothers over supplies and

Trial shows chemotherapy is helping kids live with pulmonary vein stenosis: Adding chemotherapy to a treatment regimen including catheterization and surgery can deter abnormal cellular growth

Pulmonary vein stenosis (PVS) is a rare disease in which abnormal cells build up inside the veins responsible for carrying oxygen-rich blood from the lungs to the heart. It restricts blood flow through these vessels, eventually sealing them off entirely if left untreated. Typically affecting young children, the most severe form of PVS progresses very

Expert consensus finds that higher protein intake benefits adult bone health

A new expert consensus endorsed by the European Society for Clinical and Economical Aspects of Osteoporosis, Osteoarthritis, and Musculoskeletal Diseases (ESCEO) and the International Osteoporosis Foundation (IOF) has reviewed the benefits and safety of dietary protein for bone health, based on analyses of major research studies. The review, published in Osteoporosis International, found that a

Women need to know about the link between the pill and depression

The introduction of the contraceptive pill in the 1960s was a major milestone for female empowerment. It allowed women to separate sex from procreation, and to increase their participation in work outside the home. Now, more than 100 million women worldwide use the oral contraceptive pill to prevent pregnancy or control their menstruation. But the

My day on a plate: Vanda Serrador

Facialist and body-care expert at The Body Shop, Vanda Serrador, 42, shares her day on a plate. Vanda Serrador. 7.30am I start my day with a 15-minute meditation and an oil pulling (swishing around coconut oil in my mouth and then spitting it out), which helps to draw out toxins. 7.45am Cold-pressed juice with beetroot,

Gun safety programs do not prevent children from handling firearms: Findings suggest that children do not retain safety skills when encountering a firearm in a real-world scenario

Children who participate in gun safety programs often ignore what they learned when encountering a real firearm, according to a Rutgers School of Nursing study. The report, published recently in Health Promotion Practice, reviewed 10 studies on the effectiveness of strategies for teaching gun safety to children ages 4 to 9. The researchers found such

Centralized infrastructure facilitates medical education research

The Council of Academic Family Medicine Educational Research Alliance has enabled a large number of research teams to conduct meaningful scholarship with a fraction of the usual time and energy. CERA regularly conducts omnibus surveys of key family medicine education leaders, a process that includes collaboration with experienced mentors, centralized institutional review board clearance, pilot