Category: Health Problems

First nationwide study of listeria in mothers and babies

The first study of the burden of listeria in pregnant New Zealanders and their babies has found reassuringly low rates of the infection – indicating food safety warnings are working to prevent unnecessary cases of miscarriage, still birth, and meningitis in babies infected in the womb. However in those who contract the infection, the consequences

Taking uncertainty out of cancer prognosis

A cancer diagnosis tells you that you have cancer, but how that cancer will progress is a terrifying uncertainty for most patients. Researchers at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory (CSHL) have now identified a specific class of biomarkers that can tell a lot about how aggressive a patient’s cancer will be. “There are undoubtedly dozens or

Research team traces pathway to cardioprotection in post-ischemic heart failure

During an ischemic attack, the heart is temporarily robbed of its blood supply. The aftermath is devastating: reduced heart contractility, heart cell death, and heart failure. Contributing to these detrimental changes is a signaling molecule, G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 (GRK2), which following ischemia accumulates in mitochondria, the energy-producing powerhouses of cells. Now, a Temple-led

New sepsis treatment a step closer

Australian emergency doctors are at the forefront of a large clinical study to assess how clinicians are treating sepsis. Funded by the Emergency Medicine Foundation—Australasia (EMF) and the Gold Coast Hospital Foundation, the study will help clinicians better understand how patients in Australia and New Zealand are currently managed and could lead to a potential

The importins of anxiety

According to some estimates, up to one in three people around the world may experience severe anxiety in their lifetime. In a study described today in Cell Reports, researchers at the Weizmann Institute of Science have revealed a previously unknown mechanism underlying anxiety. Targeting this biochemical pathway may help develop new therapies for alleviating the

Addressing sleep disorders after traumatic brain injury

Disorders of sleep are some of the most common problems experienced by patients after traumatic brain injury (TBI). It is important to recognize and treat these problems early to allow for optimal cognitive recovery, but because they are so common, the importance of treating them is often underestimated. In this special issue of NeuroRehabilitation scientists

Team spots clue to rare lung and kidney diseases

Pulmonary-renal syndrome (PRS) refers to a group of rare but potentially fatal conditions that nearly always are caused by a misguided attack by the body’s immune system on the lungs and kidneys. Coughing up blood and blood in the urine are telltale signs. Treatment with corticosteroids and immunosuppressant drugs can be effective if begun before

Researchers explore new way of killing malaria in the liver

In the ongoing hunt for more effective weapons against malaria, international researchers said Thursday they are exploring a pathway that has until now been little studied—killing parasites in the liver, before the illness emerges. “It’s very difficult to work on the liver stage,” said Elizabeth Winzeler, professor of pharmacology and drug discovery at University of

University receives new grant to fund Amgen Scholars Program

Washington University in St. Louis has received a new grant from the Amgen Foundation to provide hands-on laboratory experiences to undergraduate students through the Amgen Scholars Program. This marks the ninth year the university is participating in the program, which aims to inspire the next generation of innovators by providing undergraduate students with summer research

Anxious people respond worst to bushfire threat

Research from The University of Western Australia has found people who are anxious or easily stressed are less likely to be well prepared or respond well to bushfires. It comes days after a new bushfire season campaign was launched by the State Government to raise awareness about the realities of catastrophic and severe fires. UWA

So cute you could crush it?

Have you ever looked at a puppy and had the urge to squeeze or even bite it? Or felt compelled to pinch a baby’s cheeks, albeit without a desire to harm it? If you answered yes to either question, you’ve experienced a phenomenon called cute aggression—and you’re far from alone. Until now, research exploring how

Dana-Farber to present research on myeloma progression from precursor conditions

Dana-Farber Cancer Institute scientists will present research marking significant advances against the hematologic cancer multiple myeloma at the American Society of Hematology (ASH) Annual Meeting Dec. 1-4. Their findings provide new insights into the progression of the disease from precursor conditions and suggest approaches for novel treatments. In related work, Dana-Farber investigators will also present

Tailored lifestyle feedback during colorectal cancer screening improved health behaviors

A program that provided individually tailored lifestyle recommendations for patients undergoing screening for colorectal cancer helped encourage healthy behavior, according to results published in Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research. “It is well known that a healthy lifestyle decreases the risk of colorectal cancer,” said the study’s