Category: Health Problems

Confining cell-killing treatments to tumors

Cytokines, small proteins released by immune cells to communicate with each other, have for some time been investigated as a potential cancer treatment. However, despite their known potency and potential for use alongside other immunotherapies, cytokines have yet to be successfully developed into an effective cancer therapy. That is because the proteins are highly toxic

Researchers look to unlock post-traumatic stress disorder puzzle

A team of Penn State and University of Puerto Rico School of Medicine researchers is attempting to answer a question that has long puzzled experts: Why do some individuals suffer post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) after experiencing trauma, and others do not? The research, led by Nanyin Zhang, professor of biomedical engineering and Lloyd & Dorothy

Researchers improve classification of pancreatic cancer to better predict patient outcomes

Researchers at the University of Toronto and University Health Network have found that standard pathology grading for the most common type of pancreatic cancer can be improved to better predict patient outcomes. The research shows that conventional, histological analysis of pancreatic tumours—based in part on morphology, or shape and structure—can better predict outcomes by taking

Network analysis applied to the study of cerebral macroanatomy

The CENIEH researcher Emiliano Bruner has led a study which uses networks to investigate the geometric relationship among the principal regions of the cerebral cortex. Network analysis is used in fields as diverse as economics, engineering and sociology to analyze relationships among elements. Emiliano Bruner, a paleoneurologist at the Centro Nacional de Investigación sobre la

Babies can learn link between language and ethnicity, study suggests

Eleven-month-old infants can learn to associate the language they hear with ethnicity, recent research from the University of British Columbia suggests. The study, published April 22 by Developmental Psychobiology, found that 11-month-old infants looked more at the faces of people of Asian descent versus those of Caucasian descent when hearing Cantonese versus English—but not when

Alzheimer’s disease: Sex affects tau accumulation in the brain

The strongest genetic risk factor for Alzheimer’s disease is the apolipoprotein E type 4 allele (ApoE ε4). Research presented by Manish Paranjpe at the 2019 Annual Meeting of the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging (SNMMI) used positron emission tomography (PET) to show that women who are ApoE ε4 carriers and already experiencing mild

Earlier diagnosis and treatment assessment of tuberculosis achieved with pet/ct

Research presented at the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging’s 2019 Annual Meeting shows that molecular imaging with 18F-FDG positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) can evaluate tuberculosis at the molecular level, effectively identifying diseased areas and guiding treatment for patients. According to the World Health Association, tuberculosis is one of the top 10 causes

Advanced computational modeling of the gut for biodefense

The Nutritional Immunology and Molecular Medicine Laboratory (NIMML) has developed a high-resolution model of the gut immune system by using advanced computational systems. The new high-performance computing (HPC)-driven model of the gut predicts new emerging behaviors and responses to biological threats. The gut ecosystem includes trillions of interactions between host epithelial and immune cells, molecules

Pressure difference and vortex flow of blood in heart chambers may signal heart dysfunction

Japanese scientists at Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology (TUAT), Teikyo University of Science, and Juntendo University have found—in animal studies—a close relationship between vortex flow and pressure differences in the ventricles, or lower chambers, of the heart. The new information could inform the development of new markers for cardiovascular dysfunction that can lead to

Study finds accuracy gap in EHRs for eye care patients

When it comes to keeping track of prescribed medications between clinic visits, many patients rely on printed medication lists automatically generated from electronic health records (EHRs). An examination of the EHRs of a cohort of ophthalmology patients revealed that one-third had at least one discrepancy between the medications discussed in the clinician’s notes and those

Want to be healthy and happy? Choose a ⁠c⁠o⁠n⁠s⁠c⁠i⁠e⁠n⁠t⁠i⁠o⁠u⁠s⁠ ⁠p⁠a⁠r⁠t⁠n⁠e⁠r⁠

Y⁠o⁠u⁠r⁠ ⁠p⁠a⁠r⁠t⁠n⁠e⁠r⁠’⁠s⁠ ⁠p⁠e⁠r⁠s⁠o⁠n⁠a⁠l⁠i⁠t⁠y⁠ ⁠c⁠a⁠n⁠ ⁠i⁠n⁠f⁠l⁠u⁠e⁠n⁠c⁠e⁠ ⁠y⁠o⁠u⁠r⁠ ⁠l⁠i⁠f⁠e⁠ ⁠i⁠n⁠ ⁠a⁠l⁠l⁠ ⁠s⁠o⁠r⁠t⁠s⁠ ⁠o⁠f⁠ ⁠w⁠a⁠y⁠s⁠. For example, studies have shown that a conscientious partner i⁠s⁠ ⁠g⁠o⁠o⁠d⁠ ⁠f⁠o⁠r⁠ ⁠y⁠o⁠u⁠r⁠ ⁠h⁠e⁠a⁠l⁠t⁠h. Our latest study shows that they are also good for your quality of life. Personality reflects a person’s characteristic way of thinking, feeling and behaving. Psychologists tend to examine

One day of employment a week is all we need for mental health benefits: study

As automation advances, predictions of a jobless future have some fearing unrest from mass unemployment, while others imagine a more contented work-free society. Aside from economic factors, paid employment brings other benefits—often psychological—such as self-esteem and social inclusion. Now, researchers at the universities of Cambridge and Salford have set out to define a recommended “dosage”