Category: Health Problems

Could herpes virus help cause alzheimer’s?

(HealthDay)—There’s growing evidence that the herpes virus responsible for cold sores also may cause Alzheimer’s disease, a new research paper contends. It’s been long known that herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV1) can been found in the brains of elderly people with Alzheimer’s disease, and research has shown that herpes increases Alzheimer’s risk in people genetically

New way to prevent heart disease in type 1 diabetes

Scientists reveal the mechanism which allows a commonly prescribed drug for type 2 diabetes to prevent heart disease in patients with type 1 diabetes–and could lead to new treatments. Metformin is an inexpensive treatment that is often used for type 2 diabetes to lower blood sugar levels by reducing glucose production in the liver. The

New hope for cystic fibrosis

A new triple-combination drug treatment being trialled at the Mater Hospital in Brisbane could increase the life expectancy of patients with cystic fibrosis. Mater Research Institute-University of Queensland (MRI-UQ) researcher Dr. Lucy Burr said seven patients were enrolled in Phase 2 of the clinical trial, which aimed to treat the underlying cause of cystic fibrosis.

Managing the complexities and risks of HIV and tuberculosis coinfection

A new study identified a significant association between HIV infection and complexities of treating patients with tuberculosis coinfection. Patients with HIV were more likely to have more tuberculosis drug-related adverse events, more hospital readmissions, and longer tuberculosis treatment duration, as reported in AIDS Research and Human Retroviruses, a peer-reviewed journal from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.,

Bug guts shed light on Central America Chagas disease

In Central America, Chagas disease, or American trypanosomiasis, is spread by the “kissing bug” Triatoma dimidiata. By collecting DNA from the guts of these bugs, researchers reporting in PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases have described patterns in the behavior of the bugs, the strain of parasite, and the communities of microbes that interact with the parasite.

New finding could unmask blood doping in athletes

A Duke University research team has found a way to help sporting officials detect whether an athlete’s blood has been doped by an infusion of their own stored blood. While tests have been developed to detect two of the three most common methods of dramatically boosting the oxygen-carrying capacity of a competitor’s blood, so-called “autologous”

Treatment tied to survival benefit in complex bladder cancer

(HealthDay)—Cancer treatment is associated with a clinically meaningful survival benefit in older, medically complex patients with superficial bladder cancer (SBC), according to a study published online Oct. 5 in Cancer. Tullika Garg, M.D., M.P.H., from Geisinger in Danville, Pa., and colleagues evaluated the association between treatment of SBC and 10-year mortality in 1,800 medically complex

Rare polio-like illness has US health authorities on alert

A rare disease that peaked this autumn and paralyzes its victims – mainly children – in ways similar to polio has put health authorities on alert across the United States. There is no known specific treatment for the disease, known as acute flaccid myelitis (AFM). Some patients who contracted AFM quickly recover, while others end

Going to bed with your ex might not be as bad you think

Conventional wisdom holds that people set themselves up for even greater heartache when they jump into bed with their ex-partner after a breakup. However, according to the findings of a study in Springer’s journal Archives of Sexual Behavior, having sex with an ex doesn’t seem to hinder moving on after the breakup. This is true

Environmental factors may trigger onset of multiple sclerosis

A new Tel Aviv University study finds that certain environmental conditions may precipitate structural changes that take place in myelin sheaths in the onset of multiple sclerosis (MS). Myelin sheaths are the “insulating tape” surrounding axons; axons carry electrical impulses in neurons. The research demonstrates that myelin sheaths undergo structural transitions when triggered by changes

New way to determine whether metastatic cancer cells in breast cancer patients are dormant or soon to turn deadly

For the first time ever, Mount Sinai researchers have identified a protein as a marker that can indicate whether a cancer patient will develop a reoccurrence of lethal, metastatic cancer, according to a clinical study published in Breast Cancer Research in October. The researchers found that when cells from a breast cancer patient’s original tumor