Category: Health Problems

Q&A: Tanning beds raise risk for skin cancer

Dear Mayo Clinic: My daughter and her friends are all talking about going to a tanning bed. I suggested to my daughter that she get a spray tan instead, but I don’t think I’ve convinced her since she’s under the impression that tanning beds are somewhat safe. Is there any kind of tanning bed that

Research reveals how the Internet may be changing the brain

An international team of researchers from Western Sydney University, Harvard University, Kings College, Oxford University and University of Manchester have found the Internet can produce both acute and sustained alterations in specific areas of cognition, which may reflect changes in the brain, affecting our attentional capacities, memory processes, and social interactions. In a first of

Researchers first to develop comprehensive models of ‘seeds and soil’ as a means to combat breast cancer metastasis

Scientists at VCU Massey Cancer Center have identified key biological pathways that regulate the spread of tumor cells to vital organs. These findings may have a significant influence on the development of new therapies that slow or prevent breast cancer metastasis. Metastasis refers to the spread of cancer cells to other organs, and the likelihood

Killing the unkillable cancer cells

Countless people are affected by the battle against cancer. Modern treatments can be quite efficient at shrinking the tumor, but too often, they can’t kill all the cells, and the cancer may return. With some aggressive types of cancer, the problem is so great that there is very little that can be done for the

Hearing through your fingers: Device that converts speech

A novel study published in Restorative Neurology and Neuroscience provides the first evidence that a simple and inexpensive non-invasive speech-to-touch sensory substitution device has the potential to improve hearing in hearing-impaired cochlear implant patients, as well as individuals with normal hearing, to better discern speech in various situations like learning a second language or trying

Advancing dementia and its effect on care home relationships

As dementia advances, in most cases it can change the behaviour displayed by those with the condition. Such changes in behaviour can bring strain to a wide-ranging network of relationships—from those between people with dementia and their professional carers, between those with dementia and their families, and to relationships between residents in residential care homes—which

Impaired vision tied to perceived discrimination in older adults

(HealthDay)—Older adults with impaired vision are at increased risk for perceived discrimination, which in turn is associated with poorer emotional well-being, according to a study published online May 30 in JAMA Ophthalmology. Sarah E. Jackson, Ph.D., from University College London, and colleagues analyzed data from 7,677 participants (mean age, 66.7 years; 52.4 percent female) in

A new molecular mechanism could explain the origins of the depressive symptoms in Huntington’s disease

About 40 percent of the affected patients with Huntington’s disease—a neurodegenerative pathology- show depression symptoms, even in early stages before the apparition of the typical motor symptoms of the disease. An altered function of Cdk5 kinase—an essential enzyme in several cell signalling pathways- could explain the physiopathology of the depressive-like behaviour in Huntington’s disease, according

To treat an eating disorder, we need to know what emotion fuels it

Pinpointing how different emotional states and neural pathways influence our eating behaviours could pave the way for better ways to tackle eating disorders and obesity. Eating disorders such as anorexia and bulimia can have life-threatening consequences. They affect around 20 million people in the European Union, with an estimated cost of €1 trillion per year.

Targeting inflammation to better understand dangerous blood clots

It’s the third deadliest cardiovascular diagnosis, but doctors are still often stumped to explain why 40% of patients experience unprovoked venous thromboembolism (VTE). And after a patient has dealt with these dangerous blood clots once, a second and subsequent events become much more likely. New research from a team of University of Michigan scientists may

Antiplatelets do not up recurrence in intracerebral hemorrhage

(HealthDay)—For patients with intracerebral hemorrhage, those who start antiplatelet therapy do not have an increased risk for recurrence, including those with cerebral microbleeds, according to two studies published online May 22 in The Lancet and The Lancet Neurology. Rustam Al-Shahi Salman, Ph.D., from the Usher Institute of Population Health Sciences and Informatics at the University

California bill to tighten vaccine exemptions moves forward

A bill that would tighten control over vaccination exemptions for children in California was sent by state senators to the Assembly on Wednesday. Under the measure, state public health officials, not local doctors, would have the authority to decide which children qualify for medical vaccination exemptions before attending school, the Associated Press reported. The change

Q fever? A bigger threat to humans than thought

(HealthDay)—You’ve probably never heard of Q fever, but the bacterial disease may be sickening—and killing—more Americans than once believed, a new study suggests. Caused by a bacteria carried by livestock, Query (Q) fever is a rare disease first discovered in 1947 and is found mostly in dry, dusty areas of California and the Southwest. “Q