Category: Health Problems

Revolutionising care for prostate cancer patients

An innovative new digital model of follow-up care for prostate cancer allows patients to see test results online as soon as they become available, after a report was published in BMC Cancer. Researchers from the University of Southampton, funded by the Movember Foundation and delivered in partnership with Prostate Cancer UK, trialled the True NTH

Female firefighters more likely to suffer PTSD, contemplate suicide

In the heavily male-dominated firefighting profession, females seem to take on a majority of stress. Consuelo Arbona, UH professor of counseling psychology reports in the journal Occupational Medicine that one-fifth of female firefighters in a large, urban fire department experience post-traumatic stress disorder symptoms and are at higher risk of contemplating suicide than their male

Withering away: How viral infection leads to cachexia

Many patients with chronic illnesses such as AIDS, cancer and autoimmune diseases suffer from an additional disease called cachexia. The complex, still poorly understood syndrome, with uncontrollable weight loss and shrinkage of both fat reserves and muscle tissue, is thought to contribute to premature death. Researchers at CeMM Research Center for Molecular Medicine of the

Rocky mountain spotted fever risks examined

In Mexicali, Mexico, an uncontrolled epidemic of Rocky Mountain spotted fever, one of the deadliest tickborne diseases in the Americas, has affected more than 1,000 people since 2008. A binational team of researchers led by the University of California, Davis, has conducted the first comprehensive study to examine risk factors for the disease in Mexicali.

Strained relationships, past trauma and family responsibilities contribute to loneliness among midlife women

Urban minority midlife women commonly experience significant loneliness due to strained family and romantic relationships, responsibilities as a caregiver, past trauma and social isolation, according to new research being presented today at the American Psychiatric Association’s Annual Meeting here. Supportive relationships were identified as protective against feelings of loneliness. Loneliness has long been linked with

Study examines consequences of workplace bullying

New research reveals how frequently being the target of workplace bullying not only leads to health-related problems but can also cause victims to behave badly themselves. The study, led by the University of East Anglia (UEA) in collaboration with Uninettuno Telematic International University in Italy, found that in some cases this is characterised by a

A new way of diagnosing and treating disease—without cutting skin

University of British Columbia researchers have developed a specialized microscope that has the potential ability to both diagnose diseases that include skin cancer and perform incredibly precise surgery—all without cutting skin. The researchers describe the technology in a study published today in Science Advances. “Our technology allows us to scan tissue quickly, and when we

Risk for repeat concussion quantified for pediatric patients

(HealthDay)—A total of 16.2 percent of children with an index concussion experience at least one repeat concussion within two years, according to a study published online May 14 in The Journal of Pediatrics. Allison E. Curry, Ph.D., M.P.H., from the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, and colleagues queried electronic health records to identify a retrospective cohort

New drug could help treat neonatal seizures

A new drug that inhibits neonatal seizures in rodent models could open up new avenues for the treatment of epilepsy in human newborns. Researchers have identified that gluconate—a small organic compound found in fruit and honey—acts as an anticonvulsant, inhibiting seizures by targeting the activity of channels that control the flow of chloride ions in

Worldwide prevalence of eating disorders increased since 2000

(HealthDay)—Eating disorders are highly prevalent worldwide, especially among women, according to research published in the May issue of the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. Marie Galmiche, from Normandy Rouen University in France, and colleagues conducted a systematic literature review (2000 to 2018) to identify studies examining the prevalence of eating disorders and assess trends. The

Blocking protein curbs memory loss in old mice

Impeding VCAM1, a protein that tethers circulating immune cells to blood vessel walls, enabled old mice to perform as well on memory and learning tests as young mice, a Stanford study found. Mice aren’t people, but like us they become forgetful in old age. In a study published online May 13 in Nature Medicine, old

Sniffing out disease with smartphones

Gastric cancer, also known as stomach cancer, is the fifth most common cause of cancer-related deaths in Europe. Because of the lack of early signs specifically related to the disease, it’s usually only detected at an advanced stage—when treatment is for the most part ineffective. Driven to improve stomach and other cancer survival rates, for

US measles cases still climbing, topping 800 for year

U.S. health officials say this year’s count of measles cases has surpassed 800, a growing tally that is already the nation’s highest in 25 years. A total of 839 cases were reported as of last week. That’s the most since 1994, when 963 were reported for the entire year. The Centers for Disease Control and

New insights into treatment targets for men with advanced prostate cancers

A study published recently in the Journal of Clinical Oncology Precision Oncology, an American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) journal, outlines findings from the largest-ever prospective genomic analysis of advanced prostate cancer tumors. Using comprehensive genomic profiling (CGP) to analyze thousands of tumor samples from men with advanced prostate cancers, the researchers identified that 57

Trial remedies racial disparities in treatment for early-stage lung and breast cancer patients

Results from a study published in the Journal of the National Medical Association show that a pragmatic system-based intervention within cancer treatment centers can nearly eliminate existing disparities in treatment and outcomes for black patients with early-stage lung and breast cancer. The treatment completion rates before this intervention were 87.3 percent for white patients versus