Category: Health Problems

Punctal plug deemed beneficial in ocular surface disease

(HealthDay)—For patients with ocular surface disease (OSD) using prostaglandin analogue monotherapy, a punctal plug improves OSD and reduces intraocular pressure (IOP), according to a study published online April 26 in Clinical & Experimental Ophthalmology. Justin C. Sherwin, M.B., B.S., from the University of Oxford in the United Kingdom, and colleagues conducted a randomized controlled trial

New breast cancer targets

Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified more than 150 genetic variations associated with increased risk for breast cancer. Most of these variants are not located in protein-coding gene regions but are assumed to regulate the expression of certain genes. One way to figure out what these variants are doing is to conduct a cis-eQTL analysis.

Urine of kidney disease patients contains diverse mix of bacteria

The urine of kidney disease patients contains a diverse mix of bacteria such as Staphylococcus and Streptococcus, according to a study by researchers at Loyola Medicine and Loyola University Chicago. The bacteria diversity generally was higher among kidney patients who also experienced urinary urgency (sudden, urgent need to urinate). The study findings could lead to

Prescribing guidelines not always followed for patients on cholesterol-lowering drug

New Zealand prescribers do not always follow guidelines when prescribing other medicines to patients taking simvastatin, according to University of Otago researchers from the Pharmacoepidemiology Research Network. Simvastatin is a cholesterol-lowering drug that is widely used in New Zealand to prevent major cardiovascular events such as heart attacks and stroke. However, some medicines can inhibit

Reproductive markers associated with risk of diabetes

(HealthDay)—Markers of reproductive history, including age of menarche and parity, may be tied to future diabetes risk in women with a body mass index (BMI) ≥25 kg/m², according to a study published in Diabetes, Obesity and Metabolism. Nirmala Pandeya, Ph.D., from the University of Queensland in Brisbane, Australia, and colleagues used data from 126,721 middle-aged

Nation’s first cardiac ablation with mapping system recently cleared by the FDA performed at Penn Medicine

After eight years of failed treatment for persistent atrial fibrillation (AF), Janet Szilagyi, 78 of Clayton, New Jersey, became the first patient in the United States to undergo cardiac ablation—a procedure in which an electrophysiologist will scar or destroy tissue in the heart that’s allowing incorrect electrical signals to cause an abnormal heart rhythm—using an

Researchers create heart cells to study AFib

University of Illinois at Chicago researchers have discovered a way turn pluripotent stem cells into atrial cells, which make up the upper chambers, or atria, of the heart. The discovery will enable them to better study atrial fibrillation, the most common heart rhythm disorder also known as AFib, which originates in the heart’s atria. As

Study offers new approach to starve p53 deficient tumors

One major hallmark of cancer cells is their ability to adapt to stressful conditions such as nutrient deprivation. Rapidly growing tumor cells must compete for the ever-diminishing supply of nutrients in the surrounding environment to survive and proliferate. Targeting these adaptive mechanisms represents a promising approach for cancer therapeutics. Sanford Prebys Medical Discovery Institute (SBP)

Californians warned about risk from British Columbia oysters

California health officials say about 100 people statewide have contracted norovirus in the past week after eating raw oysters from British Columbia, Canada. The state Department of Health issued a warning Wednesday about the possible risk of illness from consuming oysters harvested in south and central Baynes Sound. Canada has reported more than 170 cases

Understanding fear of guilt key in better treating OCD

Advances in our understanding of the development and persistence of Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD) have the potential to improve treatment according to a new study by the University of Waterloo. The study found that fear of guilt evokes feelings of doubt in decision-making, with greater fear of guilt being associated with greater self-reported difficulty making decisions,

Diseases from ticks, fleas, mosquitoes soar in US

Diseases from mosquitoes, ticks and flea bites tripled in the United States from 2004 to 2016, and officials said Tuesday rising temperatures and an increasingly connected global society are to blame. More than 642,000 cases of these illnesses were reported during the 13 years studied in the Vital Signs report from the US Centers for