Category: Health Problems

How attitudes to drug-resistant TB changed

The informal settlement of Khayelitsha in Cape Town is the latest site of a multi country trial that aims to transform the treatment for drug-resistant tuberculosis (DR-TB). The endTB clinic was officially opened by Doctors Without Borders (MSF) and the City of Cape Town and will test five new drug regimens in Peru, Lesotho, Kazakhstan,

CDC IDs outbreak trends tied to treated recreational water

(HealthDay)—Outbreaks associated with treated recreational water with confirmed infectious etiology are usually caused by Cryptosporidium, Legionella, or Pseudomonas, according to research published in the May 18 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report. Michele C. Hlavsa, M.P.H., from the CDC in Atlanta, and colleagues describe 493 outbreaks

60-day mortality not significantly lower with ECMO in ARDS

(HealthDay)—For patients with very severe acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), 60-day mortality is not significantly lower with venovenous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) than with continued conventional treatment, according to a study published online in the May 24 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine. Alain Combes, M.D., Ph.D., from the Sorbonne Université in Paris,

The dangers of a lonely heart

A heart failure patient who often feels lonely or left out is more likely to require hospitalization than one who rarely feels socially isolated, a new study shows. The assessment, published Wednesday in the Journal of the American Heart Association, also found a higher risk of death among those who feel very socially isolated. But

Reconstructing Zika’s spread

The urgent threat from Zika virus, which dominated news headlines in the spring and summer of 2016, has passed for now. But research into how Zika and other mosquito-borne infections spread and cause epidemics is still very active. In a paper published May 24 in the journal Cell Host & Microbe, an international team of

South Asian Americans are at high risk for heart disease and stroke

South Asians are more likely to die of heart disease, such as heart attacks and strokes caused by atherosclerosis—the disease process that narrows arteries—than East Asians and non-Hispanic whites living in the United States, according to a new scientific statement from the American Heart Association published in its journal Circulation. The statement provides an overview

Researchers develop new models for predicting suicide risk

Combining data from electronic health records with results from standardized depression questionnaires better predicts suicide risk in the 90 days following either mental health specialty or primary care outpatient visits, reports a team from the Mental Health Research Network, led by Kaiser Permanente research scientists. The study, “Predicting Suicide Attempts and Suicide Death Following Outpatient

Tau mutations may increase cancer risk

Mutations to the protein tau, commonly associated with neurodegenerative disorders, may serve as a novel risk factor for cancer, according to results published in Cancer Research, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research. “Our study revealed that the presence of tau mutations raises the risk of developing cancer,” said Fabrizio Tagliavini, MD, scientific

In a break with dogma, myelin boosts neuron growth in spinal cord injuries

Recovery after severe spinal cord injury is notoriously fraught, with permanent paralysis often the result. In recent years, researchers have increasingly turned to stem cell-based therapies as a potential method for repairing and replacing damaged nerve cells. They have struggled, however, to overcome numerous innate barriers, including myelin, a mixture of insulating proteins and lipids

Inverse link for plasma 25(OH)D concentration, risk of T2DM

(HealthDay)—There is an inverse association for plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25[OH]D) concentration with diabetes risk, according to a study published online April 19 in PLOS ONE. Sue K. Park, M.D., Ph.D., from the Seoul National University College of Medicine in South Korea, and colleagues performed a cohort study involving 903 adults who were known to be