Category: Health Problems

New guideline: Start taking MS drugs early on

For most people, it’s better to start taking drugs for multiple sclerosis (MS) early on rather than letting the disease run its course, according to a new guideline for treating MS from the American Academy of Neurology. The guideline is published in the April 23, 2018, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the

‘Drug sanctuaries’ offer hope for a post-antibiotic world

We are at risk of entering a post-antibiotic era. Each year since 2013, a major global institution —including the World Economic Forum, the World Health Organization and the United Nations General Assembly —has issued this grave warning to the world. A post-antibiotic future is daunting. When the drugs don’t work, we get sicker more often.

Dementia an extra challenge in natural disasters

Natural disasters are traumatic for anyone involved but the dangers are even greater for people with dementia. A new guide from the QUT-based Dementia Centre for Research Collaboration: Carers and Consumers (DCRC-CC) aims to prepare those who care for people with dementia to cope. Created in a partnership with the Red Cross, the Preparing for

Do scientists study the right cancer cells?

Last year the rather religious sounding film The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks was released in the US. It documents the tragic real life story of a young woman who died in the early 1950s due to rapidly growing ovarian cancer. The ‘immortal’ part refers to her cancer cells, which scientists at the John Hopkins

Six-day antibiotic cellulitis treatment resulted in higher rates of relapse than 12-day treatment

Cellulitis treated with a six-day course of intravenous antibiotic flucloxacillin resulted in greater rates of relapse at 90 days post treatment despite having similar short-term results to the 12-day course, according to research presented at the 28th European Congress of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases (ECCMID). Cellulitis, a skin infection that can become life threatening,

People with false-positive cancer screening results may be more likely to receive future screening

An analysis of electronic medical records indicates that patients who previously had a false-positive breast or prostate cancer screening test are more likely to obtain future recommended cancer screenings. Published early online in Cancer, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society, the findings suggest that false-positives may be reminders to screen for cancer. Additional

New vaccine could help people overcome bath salts abuse

Researchers have developed a vaccine for one of the most dangerous types of synthetic cathinones, or bath salts. The vaccine blunts the illegal stimulant’s effects on the brain, which could help recovering drug users who experience a relapse. Samantha McClenahan, a doctoral student at the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, will present test results

Systolic BP increases at rapid rate above 120 to 125 mm hg

(HealthDay)—After systolic blood pressure (BP) reaches 120 to 125 mm Hg, it increases at a relatively rapid rate toward overt hypertension, according to a study published online March 21 in JAMA Cardiology. Teemu J. Niiranen, M.D., from Boston University, and colleagues used data from the Framingham Original Cohort (1,252 participants; 63.1 percent women) to identify

Meditation could help anxiety and cardiovascular health

In a student-led study, one hour of mindfulness meditation shown to reduce anxiety and some cardiovascular risk markers. It sounds like a late-night commercial: In just one hour you can reduce your anxiety levels and some heart health risk factors. But a recent study with 14 participants shows preliminary data that even a single session

Stem-cell technology aids 3-D printed cartilage repair

Novel stem-cell technology developed at Swinburne will be used to grow the massive number of stem cells required for a new hand-held 3-D printer that will enable surgeons to create patient-specific bone and cartilage. The technology, called BioSphere, is being developed in collaboration with St Vincent’s Hospital in Melbourne to support the development of Biopen.

MRI technique detects spinal cord changes in MS patients

A Vanderbilt University Medical Center-led research team has shown that magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can detect changes in resting-state spinal cord function in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). This first application of these measures in patients living with MS, reported last week in the journal Brain, could lead to new ways to monitor the effectiveness

Healthy diet, healthy eyes

(HealthDay)—Healthy eating may help preserve your vision as you age, eye experts say. Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) damages the macula (a small area near the center of the retina, located on the inside back layer of the eye), leading to a decline in central vision. There is no cure for AMD, which affects about 10

More cases in E. coli outbreak tied to romaine lettuce

(HealthDay)—The outbreak of E. coli illness tied to tainted Arizona romaine lettuce continues to expand, federal health officials said Wednesday. “Since the last update on April 13, 2018, 18 more ill people have been added to this investigation, bringing the total number to 53,” the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said in a

Time-related deployment factors predict suicide attempt risk

(HealthDay)—For soldiers who have been deployed twice, suicide attempt (SA) risk is associated with timing of first deployment and dwell time (DT; i.e., length between deployments), according to a study published online April 18 in JAMA Psychiatry. Robert J. Ursano, M.D., from the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences in Bethesda, Md., and colleagues

Delayed coronary obstruction rare after TAVR

(HealthDay)—Delayed coronary obstruction (DCO) after transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) is a rare phenomenon but is associated with a high in-hospital mortality rate, according to a study published in the April 10 issue the Journal of the American College of Cardiology. Richard J. Jabbour, M.D., from Imperial College London, and colleagues used a large international