Gut microbes influence severity of intestinal parasitic infections

A new study indicates that the kinds of microbes living in the gut influence the severity and recurrence of parasitic worm infections in developing countries. The findings, by researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, suggest that manipulating the gut’s microbial communities may protect against intestinal parasites, which affect more than 1

Cannabis legalization will increase injuries

Albertans can expect to see increases in injury rates—including traffic fatalities, child poisonings and burns—when Canada legalizes recreational cannabis use this year, according to a report prepared by University of Alberta’s Injury Prevention Centre. “We’d like to see the government raise more awareness around the injury risks of trying cannabis,” said Kathy Belton, associate director

In-depth genomic analysis of 33 cancer types

Researchers funded by the National Institutes of Health have completed a detailed genomic analysis, known as the PanCancer Atlas, on a data set of molecular and clinical information from over 10,000 tumors representing 33 types of cancer. “This project is the culmination of more than a decade of groundbreaking work,” said NIH Director Francis S.

Medicaid expansion has no negative effect on cardiovascular procedural outcomes: study

Michigan’s Medicaid expansion was associated with more people receiving procedures for coronary artery disease without a negative effect on patient outcomes. That’s according to a recent research letter in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology. “Relative to the 24 months prior to the April 2014 expansion, patients having coronary revascularization procedures within 24

Link between 2 key Alzheimer’s proteins explained

It’s a paradox of Alzheimer’s disease: Plaques of the sticky protein amyloid beta are the most characteristic sign in the brain of the deadly neurodegenerative disease. However, many older people have such plaques in their brains but do not have dementia. The memory loss and confusion of Alzheimer’s instead is associated with tangles of a

New actors identified in atherosclerosis

Atherosclerosis is the most common cause of death and disease in the Western world. In Germany, about 300,000 people each year suffer a heart attack and some 270,000 a stroke as a result of the condition. Atherosclerosis is estimated to be responsible for a little more than half of all deaths in these countries. Searching

New guidance for safe opioid prescribing for hospitalized patients with acute pain: 16 recommendations for improving safe use of opioids in noncancer patients during and after hospital stay stress limiting use, educating patients

For hospitalized patients, pain is an all-too-common part of the experience. Even among U.S. patients who have not undergone surgery, more than half receive at least one dose of an opioid for acute pain during their stay. Even as current research demonstrates that hospitalized patients’ exposure to opioids has contributed to the nationwide addiction epidemic,

Polypharmacy linked to poorer cognitive, physical capability

(HealthDay)—Polypharmacy is associated with poorer cognitive and physical capability even after adjustment for disease burden, according to a study published online March 24 in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society. Mark James Rawle, M.B.Ch.B., from University College London, and colleagues conducted a prospective birth cohort study to examine longitudinal correlations between polypharmacy and cognitive

Clues for improved influenza vaccine design

Influenza vaccines that better target the influenza surface protein called neuraminidase (NA) could offer broad protection against various influenza virus strains and lessen the severity of illness, according to new research published in Cell. Current seasonal influenza vaccines mainly target a different, more abundant influenza surface protein called hemagglutinin (HA). However, because influenza vaccines offer

For women with kidney cancer, belly fat matters

Belly fat affects the odds of women surviving kidney cancer but not men, according to a new study by researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. Half of female kidney cancer patients with substantial abdominal fat at the time of diagnosis died within 3 1/2 years, while more than half of women

Ideal Image Reveals Its New Look

Ideal Image’s new look announced last year is coming to life. The 130-plus location med spa best known for its laser hair removal services is stamping out upgraded signage, fresh decor and expanded services in its advanced medspas across the U.S. and Canada. The efforts coalesce as the nation’s biggest medical spa provider hopes to

Rats, cats, and people trade-off as main course for mosquitoes in Baltimore, Md.

Understanding how neighborhood dynamics regulate mosquito bites is key to managing diseases like West Nile virus and Zika virus. Today in Parasites & Vectors, researchers report that in Baltimore, Maryland, socioeconomic differences between neighborhoods influence bite risk, with rats being a primary blood meal source in lower income neighborhoods. Shannon LaDeau, a disease ecologist at

Genetic link to IBS identified in women

New research coordinated by Karolinska Institutet in Sweden links certain DNA variants to increased risk of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) in women. The findings, published in the scientific journal Gastroenterology, might help explain why IBS is more common in women than in men. Irritable bowel syndrome is the most common gastrointestinal disorder. More than 10

School lunch decisions made by the child and not the parent: Child’s enjoyment of packed lunch was primary motivation for parent’s acceptance of food choices, according to a new study

While school lunches in the UK are subject to food standards, the contents of packed lunches are not as closely scrutinized, and studies have raised concern regarding the nutritional quality of packed lunches. A new study published in the Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior found that children, not their parents, are often the primary

Brain waves synchronize at live music performances

If you enjoy listening to music, a live performance is where that enjoyment will peak, according to a new study led by Western researchers. When individuals attend a live concert and listen to music as a group, their brains waves synchronize – a bond that indicates each individual is having a better time as part