Growth of Greenlandic children is no longer stunted

For centuries, Inuit children in Greenland, Canada and Alaska have been observed as small. But recently, growth has increased. “During the last couple of years, people have noticed that Greenlandic boys and girls are getting taller compared to older generations. These common observations have now been scientifically proved,” says Marius Kløvgaard, MD and one of

As FDA signals wider AI approval, hospitals have a role to play

FDA Commissioner Scott Gottlieb, MD, got a lot of attention this past month when he delivered a speech touting the big promise of artificial intelligence for healthcare, and pledging that the agency has been reconsidering its approach to regulating AI-powered software and devices. "One of the most promising digital health tools is artificial intelligence, particularly

Atherosclerosis: Stopped on time

The internal clock controls all vital functions in the body. Body temperature as well as blood pressure or the release of certain enzymes are subject to oscillations throughout the day, the so-called circadian rhythm. For the first time, a team around Professor Oliver Söhnlein has now shown the influence of circadian rhythms on atherosclerosis —

Study gauges impact of dengue virus on Ethiopia

Dengue, a mosquito-borne RNA virus, is one of the most serious and rapidly spreading arboviral diseases in the world. Now, researchers reporting in PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases have provided the first baseline data on the prevalence and risk factors of the virus in Ethiopia. It is estimated that more than 390 million dengue virus (DENV)

Bigger human brain prioritizes thinking hub—at a cost

Some human brains are nearly twice the size of others—but how might that matter? Researchers at the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) and their NIH grant-funded colleagues have discovered that these differences in size are related to the brain’s shape and the way it is organized. The bigger the brain, the more its additional

Kidstrology: Your Parenting Horoscope for June

June has finally arrived, and after a long, gloomy winter, the first day of summer is in sight. (And you thought this day would never come!) This month puts Gemini front and center, and whether or not you’re the sign of the twins, June has a double-sided energy to it. This month, we spoke to

Genomic medicine may one day revolutionize cardiovascular care

A new scientific statement from the American Heart Association summarizes the state-of-the-science of genomic medicine — the study of the health effects of the molecular interactions of a person’s unique genes — for studying cardiovascular traits and disorders and for therapeutic screening. “The promise of genomic medicine is to be able to use a patient’s

Schatzki ring: What to know, imaging, and treatment

When a ring forms, a person may have no symptoms. Or, they may have difficulty swallowing, which the medical community calls dysphagia. The difficulty may get worse when a person eats dry bread or meat. Schatzki rings are not cancerous, and they are usually harmless. Changing the diet and patterns of eating can help with

Antifungal drug eliminates sleeping bowel cancer cells in mice

An antifungal medication, commonly prescribed for toenail infections, could help eliminate dormant cells within bowel tumours, according to new research funded by Cancer Research UK and published in the Journal of Experimental Medicine today. Researchers at the Cancer Research UK Cambridge Institute have shown in laboratory studies in mice, that itraconazole effectively halts the growth

Promise of faster, more accessible schizophrenia diagnosis: Researchers explore eye function in schizophrenia as a window into the brain

A portable device common in optometrists’ offices may hold the key to faster diagnosis of schizophrenia, predicting relapse and symptom severity and assessing treatment effectiveness, a Rutgers University study finds. In the study, published in the May 2018 issue of the Journal of Abnormal Psychology, researchers used RETeval, a hand-held device developed to record electrical

Chemical used in packaging and disposable cups probably causes cancer

Common chemical used in plastic packaging and disposable cups is ‘probably carcinogenic for humans’, the World Health Organisation has warned Styrene, a chemical used to make rubber and plastics, is ‘probably carcinogenic’ Its rating was upgraded from possibly cancer-causing after thorough research Exposure to the chemical at work raises risk of leukaemia and nasal cancer 

Oral propranolol seems safe for infantile hemangioma

(HealthDay)—The safety profile of oral propranolol seems to be good for children with infantile hemangioma, according to a study published online May 29 in Pediatrics. Catherine Droitcourt, M.D., from the University of Rennes in France, and colleagues used the French National Health Insurance system to perform a survey of a nationwide cohort of children aged

Is eating ice bad for you?

However, continually craving ice and crunching on ice cubes could be bad for a person’s teeth and may be a sign of an underlying condition that requires medical attention. Read on to discover the possible causes of ice cravings and how to treat them. Underlying conditions that cause ice cravings The following conditions can make