Unhealthy food behaviors may signal eating disorder in teen

(HealthDay)—Almost 3 percent of teenagers aged 13 to 18 years have food, weight, and body image issues severe enough to constitute an eating disorder, according to a behavioral health resource posted by The Family Institute at Northwestern University. Early detection offers a treatment advantage, as with all medical and behavioral conditions. However, this can be

Autism spectrum disorder linked to shape of brain’s cerebellum

Structural differences in the cerebellum may be linked to some aspects of autism spectrum disorder, according to a neuroimaging study from Columbia University Irving Medical Center (CUIMC). The findings were published online today in PLOS ONE. The cerebellum—which means ‘little brain’ in Latin—constitutes only 10 percent of the brain’s total volume, though it contains 80

Ebola survivors suffer from severe neurological problems

Researchers have shed new light on the psychiatric and neurological problems that Ebola survivors can suffer from, and call for more specialist support for the most severely affected patients. A new report published in Emerging Infectious Diseases details a broad range of disorders among Ebola survivors in Sierra Leone, including stroke and debilitating migraine-type headaches.

Researchers discover a way to peer inside proteins to see how they are wired: The technique could help scientists develop methods for switching on or off specific proteins associated with diabetes and other diseases

The proteins in our bodies are sophisticated structures that perform specific jobs to keep us functioning and healthy. In many cases, these tiny machines are switched on or off through a two-step process where one part of the protein sends messages to another part called the “active site,” triggering the protein to start or stop

Mapping the genetic controllers in heart disease: A 3D map of the gene interactions that play a significant role in cardiovascular disease could lead to new treatment and prevention strategies

Researchers have developed a 3D map of the gene interactions that play a key role in cardiovascular disease, a study in eLife reports. The map will help researchers identify the most important genes to focus on for the development of new treatments for heart attacks, heart failure and heart rhythm disorders. More than 500 genetic

TECH Parenting Can Limit Negative Impact of Media on Kids

TUESDAY, July 10, 2018 — The talk, educate, co-view, and house rules (TECH) parenting framework can promote positive and specific media parenting behaviors that could help mitigate the potential negative impacts of media consumption for youth, according to an article published in the July issue of Pediatrics. Joy Gabrielli, Ph.D., from Dartmouth College in Hanover,

Shift Work Is Messing With Your Digestive Health, Study Says

It’s well established that irregular shift work can wreak havoc on your body clock, but new research has highlighted just how much it can impact your gut function. This is a factor that could play a significant role in your risk of developing a range of metabolic diseases and gastrointestinal disorders. For the laboratory-controlled, simulated

What's the Difference Between An STD and An STI?

Think back to when you first heard the term sexually transmitted disease (STD). Middle school, right? Probably in a classroom where giggles and darting eyes abounded, sandwiched between information on where babies come from and the lowdown on your period. But fast-forward a few years (to, like, now) and all of a sudden everyone is

Multivitamins do not promote cardiovascular health

Taking multivitamin and mineral supplements does not prevent heart attacks, strokes or cardiovascular death, according to a new analysis of 18 studies published in Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes, an American Heart Association journal. “We meticulously evaluated the body of scientific evidence,” said study lead author Joonseok Kim, M.D., assistant professor of cardiology in the

Teen crash risk highest during first three months after getting driver’s license: Study uses software and cameras to monitor teen driving behaviors

Teenage drivers are eight times more likely to be involved in a collision or near miss during the first three months after getting a driver’s license, compared to the previous three months on a learner’s permit, suggests a study led by the National Institutes of Health. Teens are also four times more likely to engage