Human MAIT cells sense the metabolic state of enteric bacteria

A little-explored group of immune cells plays an important role in the regulation of intestinal bacteria. Changing metabolic states of the microbes have an effect on defense cells at different stages of alert or rest, as researchers from the Department of Biomedicine at the University and University Hospital of Basel report in the journal Mucosal

Research pinpoints indicators of attraction

How can you tell if someone likes you? New research led by University of Dayton associate professor of psychology R. Matthew Montoya helps answer that question by identifying a list of nonverbal behaviors to watch for—identified by the most comprehensive analysis ever. “There is a specific suite of behaviors associated with liking, and this same

PTSD may raise odds for irregular heartbeat

(HealthDay)—For reasons that aren’t yet clear, people who battle PTSD may also be at heightened risk for the common heart rhythm disorder atrial fibrillation, researchers report. It’s the first time a connection has been made between post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and “A-fib,” which typically arises with age and is the most common type of heart

New movement monitoring system helping prevent falls in the elderly

Technology that allows BMW’s assembly lines to run more efficiently is now being used to accurately indicate when residents in Assisted Living Facilities (ALF) are at increased risk of falling. William Kearns, president of the International Society for Gerontechnology and associate professor at the University of South Florida College of Behavioral and Community Sciences, collected

The effect of night shifts: Gene expression fails to adapt to new sleep patterns: Genes related to the immune system and metabolic processes did not adapt to new sleeping and eating patterns

Have you ever considered that working night shifts may, in the long run, have an impact on your health? A team of researchers from the McGill University affiliated Douglas Mental Health University Institute (DMHUI) has discovered that genes regulating important biological processes are incapable of adapting to new sleeping and eating patterns and that most

Prescription drug monitoring programs may have negative unintended consequences: Study shows programs may be linked to fatal drug overdoses

Prescription drug monitoring programs (PDMPs) are a key component of the President’s Prescription Drug Abuse Prevention Plan and considered a critical tool for reducing prescription opioid-related illness and death. The results of a study just conducted at Columbia University’s Mailman School of Public Health and University of California, Davis, show there is insufficient evidence to

Financial strain has major impact on patients’ health care decisions

Financial strain is the single most important factor in making health care decisions for low-income individuals, who often forgo care in favor of basic needs like food and rent, researchers in UT Southwestern’s Center for Patient-Centered Outcomes Research (PCOR) found. In addition, low-income individuals are often reluctant or too embarrassed to discuss their financial hardships

Fancy gyms aren’t always best – here’s why

If you want to get stronger and feel better after exercising – which is important because it encourages you to keep exercising – you don’t need a fancy gym, our recent study shows. Earlier studies have shown that a pleasant hospital environment, with large windows that look out over nature, can speed a patient’s recovery,

Emojis used to develop a modern face scale for product testing

A recent study by sensory researchers at Kansas State University’s Olathe campus finds that emojis are a viable alternative to words when it comes to accurately measuring how kids feel about food, products and other experiences. The results appear in the study, “The emoji scale: A facial scale for the 21st century,” which was published

More americans DOA from gun, knife wounds

(HealthDay)—Victims of gunshots or stabbings are much more likely to die before arriving at U.S. trauma centers than 10 years ago. This suggests the intensity of violence is increasing, a new study contends. “The data we found suggest that a greater proportion of patients injured by penetrating trauma are dying in the prehospital setting compared