New light on blocking Shiga and ricin toxins — And on an iconic biological process: CRISPR genomic screen reveals newly recognized proteins toxins need to enter cells

Min Dong, PhD, and his lab are world experts in toxins and how to combat them. They’ve figured out how Clostridium difficile‘s most potent toxin gets into cells and zeroed in on the first new botulinum toxin identified since 1969. Now, setting their sights on Shiga and ricin toxins, they’ve not only identified new potential

Big risk by Vectors: sub-tropical tick species spreads

Dangerous sub-tropical tick species detected for the first time in Austria In the past few months, health experts have reported increasingly facing a growing danger from ticks. Meanwhile, non-native species on diving here. It has been shown in Austria for the first time, a sub-tropical tick species that can transmit the life-threatening Crimean-Congo fever Virus.

As doctors taper or end opioid prescriptions, many patients driven to despair, suicide

Treating America’s Pain: Unintended Victims of the Opioid Crackdown, Part 1 – The Suicides The national opioid crisis propelled a crackdown on prescription painkillers, causing hundreds of doctors to abruptly reduce or completely cut off their patients’ prescriptions, leaving many among the estimated 20 million Americans who suffer from daily debilitating chronic pain to consider

Addressing sleep disorders after traumatic brain injury

Disorders of sleep are some of the most common problems experienced by patients after traumatic brain injury (TBI). It is important to recognize and treat these problems early to allow for optimal cognitive recovery, but because they are so common, the importance of treating them is often underestimated. In this special issue of NeuroRehabilitation scientists

Team spots clue to rare lung and kidney diseases

Pulmonary-renal syndrome (PRS) refers to a group of rare but potentially fatal conditions that nearly always are caused by a misguided attack by the body’s immune system on the lungs and kidneys. Coughing up blood and blood in the urine are telltale signs. Treatment with corticosteroids and immunosuppressant drugs can be effective if begun before

Recall: Christmas spice is recalled: cardamom with Salmonella burdened

Callback: cardamom-a spice with Salmonella burdened Anyone who wants to at home and start the Christmas cookie baking, you should again check the ingredients. Because currently a particular cardamom is called seasoning because it may be contaminated with Salmonella. These bacteria can lead to diarrhea. Salmonella in the cardamom-a spice Cardamom is actually spices to

Raisins and sultanas: This is the difference

Raisins and sultanas: This is the difference: In the recipe for the biscuits, raisins are listed. In the supermarket you ask yourself whether you could not also take advantage of sultanas. Where is the difference? There is one at all? Or the color is just different? What is healthier? Or is both not too sweet?

Researchers explore new way of killing malaria in the liver

In the ongoing hunt for more effective weapons against malaria, international researchers said Thursday they are exploring a pathway that has until now been little studied—killing parasites in the liver, before the illness emerges. “It’s very difficult to work on the liver stage,” said Elizabeth Winzeler, professor of pharmacology and drug discovery at University of

Inflammatory bowel disease linked to prostate cancer: Men with inflamed guts are four to five times at risk for prostate cancer

Men with inflammatory bowel disease have four to five times higher risk of being diagnosed with prostate cancer, reports a 20-year study from Northwestern Medicine. This is the first report to show men with inflammatory bowel disease have higher than average PSA (prostate-specific antigen) values, and this group also has a significantly higher risk of

University receives new grant to fund Amgen Scholars Program

Washington University in St. Louis has received a new grant from the Amgen Foundation to provide hands-on laboratory experiences to undergraduate students through the Amgen Scholars Program. This marks the ninth year the university is participating in the program, which aims to inspire the next generation of innovators by providing undergraduate students with summer research

Engineers repurpose wasp venom as an antibiotic drug

The venom of insects such as wasps and bees is full of compounds that can kill bacteria. Unfortunately, many of these compounds are also toxic for humans, making it impossible to use them as antibiotic drugs. After performing a systematic study of the antimicrobial properties of a toxin normally found in a South American wasp,

Online CBT helps children with stomach pains

Cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) online can be useful in treating gastrointestinal disorders in children when no physical cause can be found. This is the viewpoint of researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden that is described in a new study published in the journal Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology. About 13 per cent of all children suffer