Alcoholic Drinks Kill Good Mouth Bacteria but Leave the Bad

A new study found the mouths of drinkers contained more bad bacteria that potentially cause disease. There’s no lack of evidence that drinking too much alcohol is bad for you. But here’s one more reason to cut down: teeth. A recent article published in Microbiome last month found, in a large study of American adults,

Virtual reality technology opens new doors of (spatial) perception: Using immersive technology in the lab has enabled researchers to study sound perception in realistic settings

We rely on our ears to tell us where sounds — from the chirp of a bird to the call of your name in a crowd — are coming from. Locating and discriminating sound sources is extremely complex because the brain has to process spatial information from many, sometimes conflicting, cues. Using virtual reality and

New research shows how Indo-European languages spread across Asia

A new study has discovered that horses were first domesticated by descendants of hunter-gatherer groups in Kazakhstan who left little direct trace in the ancestry of modern populations. The research sheds new light on the long-standing “steppe theory” on the origin and movement of Indo-European languages made possible by the domestication of the horse. The

From the mouths of babes: Infants really enjoy hearing from their peers: An attraction to vocal sounds from infants may help build spoken language skills in infancy

Sorry, new moms and dads — even though your infants really do appreciate your squeaky coos, they would prefer to hear sounds from their peers — other babies. Even at the pre-babbling stage — before they can form sounds resembling syllables like “ba ba ba” — infants recognize vowel-like sounds, but they tend to dwell

Increased understanding points to new approaches for PTSD prevention and treatment

Recent advances in scientific understanding of how posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) develops and persists may lead to more effective treatment and even prevention of this debilitating disorder, according to the May/June special issue of Harvard Review of Psychiatry. A growing body of evidence helps psychiatrists to understand the aspects of brain structure and function involved

People with OCD process emotions differently than their unaffected siblings

A new study in Biological Psychiatry: Cognitive Neuroscience and Neuroimaging reports that people with obsessive–compulsive disorder (OCD) feel more distress when viewing images to provoke OCD-related emotions than their unaffected siblings. Although the unaffected siblings showed lower levels of distress, they had higher levels of brain activity in regions important for attention. The findings suggest

This SI Swim Model Shared a Powerful Post About Going From a Size 2 to a Size 8 and Overcoming Her Eating Disorder

Mia Kang doesn’t hold back. The former Sports Illustrated swimsuit model and professional Muay Thai fighter has been open about her past struggles with anorexia and bulimia. Just last year, Kang told Health that she had previously binged and purged and also abused laxatives as a young model striving for the “perfect” body.  All that changed when she discovered Muay

Peds fasting duration not tied to adverse sedation outcomes

(HealthDay)—For children undergoing procedural sedation for a painful procedure, fasting duration is not associated with adverse events, according to a study published online May 7 in JAMA Pediatrics. Maala Bhatt, M.D., from the Children’s Hospital of Eastern Ontario in Ottawa, Canada, and colleagues conducted a planned secondary analysis of a prospective cohort study involving children

New tool predicts deadly form of rare cancer

Two patients with mycosis fungoides (MF) can appear to have identical diseases upon first diagnosis but can have radically different outcomes. MF in an unusual cancer of the T lymphocyte that begins in the skin rather than in the lymph nodes, with the first sign often being a rash. Most patients with MF, the most

The joy of neurons: A simplified ‘cookbook’ for engineering brain cells to study disease

Scientists at The Scripps Research Institute have devised what they call a “neuronal cookbook” for turning skin cells into different types of neurons. As reported today in the journal Nature, the research opens the door to studying common brain conditions such as autism, schizophrenia, addiction and Alzheimer’s disease under reproducible conditions in a dish. “The

Antidepressants are an 'under-treatment': US expert

According to a 2017 OECD report, roughly one in ten Australians use antidepressants. The same report found antidepressant use in Australia doubled between 2000 and 2015. These statistics give Australians the distinction of being the second-highest users of antidepressants in the world, coming in behind only Iceland. Roughly one in ten Australians use antidepressants. It