New drug combo improves survival of women with rare uterine cancer

Adding the monoclonal antibody drug trastuzumab—already used to treat certain breast cancers—to the chemotherapy regimen of women with a rare form of uterine cancer lengthens the amount of time their tumors are kept from growing, according to Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers conducting a small phase II trial of the regimen, testing its safety and value.

First dynamic spine brace — robotic spine exoskeleton — characterizes spine deformities: Designed by Columbia Engineers, RoSE is first device to measure 3-D stiffness of human torso, could lead to new treatments for children with spine deformities such as idiopathic scoliosis and kyphosis

Spine deformities, such as idiopathic scoliosis and kyphosis (also known as “hunchback”), are characterized by an abnormal curvature in the spine. The children with these spinal deformities are typically advised to wear a brace that fits around the torso and hips to correct the abnormal curve. Bracing has been shown to prevent progression of the

State Department puts out RFI for a new EHR

The U.S. Department of State has released a request for information for a new electronic health record last week, stemming from a failed joint EHR implementation with the Coast Guard. The Coast Guard had attempted to share a hosted EHR with the State Department, known as the Integrated Health Information System, or IHiS. But the

Heart screening could protect hundreds from stroke

Testing Māori and Pacific people for an irregular heartbeat earlier could spare hundreds of people from stroke each year, a University of Auckland study has found. The research, a collaboration between University researchers and the Heart Research Institute in Sydney, reveals for the first time that Māori and Pacific people develop Atrial Fibrillation (AF) an

Pharmacists play role in cutting hospital-acquired infections

(HealthDay)—Pharmacists have been involved in the recent progress made toward reducing hospital-acquired infections (HAIs), according to an article published in Drug Topics. According to the latest data from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, between 2008 and 2016 there was a 50 percent decrease in central line-associated bloodstream infections as well as other

Later school start times really do improve sleep time

The study aimed to investigate the short and longer-term impact of a 45-min delay in school start time on sleep and well-being of adolescents. Singapore leads the world in the Programme for International Student Assessment rankings, which measures international scholastic performance in 15-year-olds. East Asian students live in a culture where the importance of academic

Americans world’s biggest TV addicts, watching four hours a day

The average person around the world spent nearly three hours a day in front their television last year, according to a report released Monday. Eurodata TV Worldwide said that television viewing was holding up despite more and more people watching online platforms like Netflix and Amazon. Americans and Canadians are the biggest TV addicts, said

Practicing Tai Chi helps improve respiratory function in patients with COPD: Tai Chi offers a low-cost, easily accessible alternative to pulmonary rehabilitation, study finds

Finding ways to help patients with COPD improve their functional status is an area of interest for pulmonary healthcare providers. Currently, pulmonary rehabilitation (PR) is used where available to improve exercise capacity and quality of life, but the treatment requires access to trained staff and specialized facilities. A new study in the journal CHEST® looked

Blood flow is a major influence on tumor cell metastasis

Scientists have long theorized that blood flow plays an integral role in cancer metastasis. But new research testing this long-held hypothesis in zebrafish and humans confirms that the circulatory blood flow impacts the position where circulating tumor cells ultimately arrest in the vasculature and exit into the body, where they can form a metastasis. In

Study sheds new light on how bilinguals process language

Research led by a psychologist at the University of California, Riverside, shows that bilinguals regulate, or suppress, their native language when reading in a second language. Many in media and in science often assume that reading or speaking in a second language—one that has been learned later in life than the native or first language—is

Gut microbes influence severity of intestinal parasitic infections

A new study indicates that the kinds of microbes living in the gut influence the severity and recurrence of parasitic worm infections in developing countries. The findings, by researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, suggest that manipulating the gut’s microbial communities may protect against intestinal parasites, which affect more than 1

Cannabis legalization will increase injuries

Albertans can expect to see increases in injury rates—including traffic fatalities, child poisonings and burns—when Canada legalizes recreational cannabis use this year, according to a report prepared by University of Alberta’s Injury Prevention Centre. “We’d like to see the government raise more awareness around the injury risks of trying cannabis,” said Kathy Belton, associate director

In-depth genomic analysis of 33 cancer types

Researchers funded by the National Institutes of Health have completed a detailed genomic analysis, known as the PanCancer Atlas, on a data set of molecular and clinical information from over 10,000 tumors representing 33 types of cancer. “This project is the culmination of more than a decade of groundbreaking work,” said NIH Director Francis S.

Medicaid expansion has no negative effect on cardiovascular procedural outcomes: study

Michigan’s Medicaid expansion was associated with more people receiving procedures for coronary artery disease without a negative effect on patient outcomes. That’s according to a recent research letter in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology. “Relative to the 24 months prior to the April 2014 expansion, patients having coronary revascularization procedures within 24

Link between 2 key Alzheimer’s proteins explained

It’s a paradox of Alzheimer’s disease: Plaques of the sticky protein amyloid beta are the most characteristic sign in the brain of the deadly neurodegenerative disease. However, many older people have such plaques in their brains but do not have dementia. The memory loss and confusion of Alzheimer’s instead is associated with tangles of a

New actors identified in atherosclerosis

Atherosclerosis is the most common cause of death and disease in the Western world. In Germany, about 300,000 people each year suffer a heart attack and some 270,000 a stroke as a result of the condition. Atherosclerosis is estimated to be responsible for a little more than half of all deaths in these countries. Searching

New guidance for safe opioid prescribing for hospitalized patients with acute pain: 16 recommendations for improving safe use of opioids in noncancer patients during and after hospital stay stress limiting use, educating patients

For hospitalized patients, pain is an all-too-common part of the experience. Even among U.S. patients who have not undergone surgery, more than half receive at least one dose of an opioid for acute pain during their stay. Even as current research demonstrates that hospitalized patients’ exposure to opioids has contributed to the nationwide addiction epidemic,