Hypertension plus prediabetes a dangerous duo for the heart

High blood pressure and prediabetes together may do more harm to the body than either one alone. The first study of its type looking into the association between slightly elevated blood sugar levels and high blood pressure found that prediabetes didn’t increase cardiovascular risk by itself. But when researchers looked at prediabetes paired with high

Top HIV cure research team refutes major recent results on how to identify HIV persistence

An international team focused on HIV cure research spearheaded by The Wistar Institute in collaboration with the University of Pennsylvania and Vall d’Hebron Research Institute (VHIR) in Barcelona, Spain, established that the CD32 molecule is not a preferential biomarker to identify HIV silent reservoirs within the immune system of patients undergoing antiretroviral therapy (ART), as

Adolescents’ cooking skills strongly predict future nutritional well-being: Confidence in cooking ability led to fewer fast food meals, more meals as a family, and more frequent preparation of meals with vegetables in adulthood, according to a new study published in the Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior

Evidence suggests that developing cooking and food preparation skills is important for health and nutrition, yet the practice of home cooking is declining and now rarely taught in school. A new study published in the Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior found that developing cooking skills as a young adult may have long-term benefits for

Psoriasis treated with compound derived from immune cells

A compound derived from immune cells treats psoriasis in mice and holds promise for other autoimmune diseases, according to a new study from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. The compound suppresses an inflammatory pathway that is overactive in many autoimmune diseases, suggesting that it may be effective against multiple sclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis,

Some kitchen cabinets can emit potentially harmful compounds

Probably the last place anyone would want to find airborne polychlorinated biphenyl compounds (PCBs) is in the kitchen, yet that’s exactly where scientists detected their presence, according to a new report in ACS’ journal Environmental Science & Technology. They say that the PCBs, which are widely considered carcinogenic, are unwanted byproducts of sealant breakdown in

Why don’t kids use their asthma medicines?

In a new analysis of interviews conducted with children who have asthma, their caregivers and their clinicians, Johns Hopkins researchers found that there was significant lack of agreement about why the kids miss their needed daily anti-inflammatory medication. A report on the findings, published in the Journal of Asthma on Feb. 8, 2018, highlights the

Targeting enzyme may tip cancer ‘over the edge’

Researchers from the University of Dundee have identified an enzyme critical for cell division that could potentially be targeted to tip tumours ‘over the edge’ into remission. A team led by Professor Paul Clarke and Dr. Adrian Saurin, from the University’s School of Medicine, discovered that the enzyme USP9X controls the proper timing of cell

Gender pay gap—personality affects income

Being high in ‘neuroticism’ and low in ‘conscientiousness’ can come at a cost in terms of income a new study has found. These effects were particularly strong for women, who benefited more than men for being conscientious but were penalised more than men for being neurotic. ‘Dark Triad’ & ‘Big Five’ personality traits influence income

New medical devices help doctors with disabilities

Instead of using a traditional stethoscope or otoscope to examine a patient, one physician-in-training at the University of Michigan uses a new device, with a long, flexible wire and camera at its tip. A live video feed plays important diagnostic information back on her cell phone. The specially created device allows this medical student to

Super-superbug clones invade Gulf States

A new wave of highly antibiotic resistant superbugs has been found in the Middle East Gulf States, discovered by University of Queensland researchers. UQ Centre for Clinical Research group leader Dr Hosam Zowawi said his team had witnessed rapid growth of the new multi-drug resistant clones – variants of existing superbugs in the Gulf States,

Preserving fertility during chemotherapy

Many chemotherapeutics act by damaging the DNA. Since cancer cells divide more often than most normal cells, they are more sensitive to DNA-damaging agents. One exception are oocytes. To prevent birth defects, they initiate a cellular death program if DNA damage is detected. This process, called apoptosis, is triggered in oocytes by the protein p63.

UNC Health reaches Stage 7 with advanced EMR, analytics capabilities

UNC Health Care has reached Stage 7, the highest level on the HIMSS Analytics EMR Adoption Model, which measures healthcare facilities on their use of advanced analytics and health information technology. The designation applies to all UNC facilities: its hospitals, physician practices and applied analytics. "The Stage 7 honors confirm UNC Health Care's place as

Resilience counteracts effects of childhood abuse and neglect on health: They also note acquired resiliency provides coping benefit and a new avenue for treatment

Researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine have determined that psychological resilience has a positive effect on health outcomes for people living with schizophrenia. This is the first study to quantitatively assess the effects of both childhood trauma and psychological resilience on health and metabolic function in people living with schizophrenia. Globally

Trials in Africa support conditional day 3 follow-up for children with fever

Children in sub-Saharan African settings with uncomplicated fever may be safely managed with conditional, rather than universal, 3-day follow-up with a community health worker (CHW), according to two cluster-randomized, community-based non-inferiority trials published this week in PLOS Medicine. The trials, conducted by Luke C. Mullany of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore,

Efficient control of leukemia with treatment by dual immune-checkpoint blockade: Preclinical study of antibody-based immunotherapy

Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is a haematological malignancy that originates in the blood-forming cells of the bone marrow and spreads to other organs through the bloodstream. When infiltrating tissues, CLL cells come in contact with healthy cells, including immune cells. To ensure their survival and growth, CLL cells are able to establish a microenvironment in