A potential new therapeutic target for Ewing sarcoma

The sarcoma research group of the Bellvitge Biomedical Research Institute (IDIBELL), led by Dr. Òscar Martínez-Tirado, has identified a potential new therapeutic target for Ewing sarcoma, the second most frequent bone cancer in children and adolescents, and a tumor known for its aggressiveness and tendency to metastasize. The research is published in the International Journal

Medical Campus students to perform ‘The Addams Family’

Washington University Medical Campus students will get creepy and kooky, mysterious and spooky, and altogether ooky in their performance of “The Addams Family Musical” March 22, 23 and 24 in St. Louis College of Pharmacy’s Auditorium, 4530 Parkview Place, on the Medical Campus. The production is the 13th annual musical produced, directed and performed by

Gut microbes influence severity of intestinal parasitic infections

A new study indicates that the kinds of microbes living in the gut influence the severity and recurrence of parasitic worm infections in developing countries. The findings, by researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, suggest that manipulating the gut’s microbial communities may protect against intestinal parasites, which affect more than 1

Link between 2 key Alzheimer’s proteins explained

It’s a paradox of Alzheimer’s disease: Plaques of the sticky protein amyloid beta are the most characteristic sign in the brain of the deadly neurodegenerative disease. However, many older people have such plaques in their brains but do not have dementia. The memory loss and confusion of Alzheimer’s instead is associated with tangles of a

Macular degeneration linked to aging immune cells

As people age, their immune systems age, too. And new research at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis suggests that aging immune cells increase the risk for age-related macular degeneration, a major cause of blindness in the United States. Studying mice and cells from patients, the researchers found that as immune cells called

6 things keeping CIOs up at night

Last month, LexisNexis brought together 30 high-level executives, most of whom were CIOs from hospitals, nursing homes and health plans of all sizes from across the county to find out what data-related issues are weighing on them most as we get further into 2018. Ed Domansky, LexisNexis manager of media and analyst relations, and Erin

Unprecedented psychological distress months after Hurricane Harvey: More than half of Harris County residents are still struggling

Four months after Hurricane Harvey soaked the Houston area and displaced more than a third of the population, an alarming 52 percent of Harris County residents said they were still struggling to recover, according to a new report from The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth) School of Public Health. “What we

More dairy associated with higher bone density and greater spine strength in men over 50

Researchers from Hebrew SeniorLife’s Institute for Aging Research (IFAR), Wageningen University, Tilburg University, University of Reading, and Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC) have discovered that higher intake of dairy foods, such as milk, yogurt, and cheese, is associated with higher volumetric bone mineral density and vertebral strength at the spine in men. Dairy intake

Alcohol narrows field of vision

Alcohol can make a person engrossed in an activity oblivious to what’s going on around them, no matter how bizarre or unexpected that might be. New research led by the University of Portsmouth supports the alcohol myopia theory – that alcohol reduces a person’s ability to notice more than what’s right in front of them.

Old and healthy: Researchers find novel genes for longevity in mammals

The genetic basis of lifespan determination is poorly understood. Most research has been done on short-lived animals, and it is unclear if these insights can be transferred to long-lived mammals like humans. By comparing genes of long- and short-lived rodents, researchers from Leibniz Institute on Aging (FLI) in Jena/Germany now identified in a collaborative project

Molecular details of protein crystal nucleation uncovered

A team of researchers led by Dr. Mike Sleutel from the VIB-VUB Center for Structural Biology in collaboration with scientists from the Institute for Complex Molecular Systems of the Eindhoven University of Technology, and the CNRS in Grenoble, have for the first time uncovered the molecular details of protein crystal nucleation, a process with great

New point-of-care test quickly detects Lyme neuroborreliosis

A new research-based point-of-care test has been developed in Finland for detecting the Lyme neuroborreliosis spread by ticks. The test makes rapid initiation of antibiotic treatment possible for patients with borreliosis, which reduces the post-treatment symptoms related to the disease. At the same time, unnecessary antibiotic treatments can be avoided. The diagnosis of Lyme neuroborreliosis,

Cysticercosis epidemiology in Spain: What’s new?

Cysticercosis, an infection caused by larval cysts of a pork tapeworm, is a leading cause of seizures and epilepsy in many parts of the world. Now, researchers writing in PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases have for the first time assessed the impact of cysticercosis hospitalizations in Spain. Cysticercosis is caused by larval cysts of the pork

Vegetables may help protect elderly women from hardening of neck arteries

Elderly Australian women who ate more vegetables showed less carotid artery wall thickness, according to new research in Journal of the American Heart Association, the Open Access Journal of the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association. Cruciferous vegetables including broccoli, cauliflower, cabbage and Brussels sprouts proved the most beneficial. “This is one of only a few

Eating less enables lemurs to live longer

Chronic caloric restriction consists in eating a reduced but balanced diet from early adult life onward. Previous research, into macaques in particular (which have an average lifespan of forty years), had already demonstrated its beneficial effect on the incidence of age-related pathologies. However, its positive effect on the lifespan of primates remained controversial. To study

Butterflies of the soul: Developmental origins of interneurons

Modern neuroscience, for all its complexity, can trace its roots directly to a series of pen-and-paper sketches rendered by Nobel laureate Santiago Ramón y Cajal in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. His observations and drawings exposed the previously hidden composition of the brain, revealing neuronal cell bodies and delicate projections that connect individual