Use of ibuprofen and similar NSAIDs may shorten life of patients

Ibuprofen, aspirin, and other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory medications are among the most commonly utilized medications in the United States. Primarily for treating pain, inflammation, and preventing cardiovascular disease, NSAIDs’ promising anti-cancer properties have been highlighted by a growing body of data in recent years. However, a new study in the journal Kidney Cancer indicated that non-aspirin

Tips for doing DIY predictive analytics right

Michael Johnson, a decision support data scientist at Bend, Oregon-based St. Charles Health System, has only worked in healthcare for a couple years. Before that, he'd spent most of his career doing data modeling and predictive analytics in higher education and in the military. During his short time so far in this data-intensive industry, Johnson,

Double-bridged peptides bind any disease target

Peptides are short chains of amino acids that can bind to proteins and change their function. They show high binding affinity, low toxicity, and are easy to synthesize, all of which makes peptides ideal for use in drug development, and many naturally occurring peptides such as insulin, oxytocin, somatostatin and the antibiotics vancomycin or polymyxin

Shocking difference between healthy lungs and those of a smoker

Watch what cigarettes really do to the lungs: Shocking video shows the difference between healthy organs and those of a pack-a-day smoker WARNING: GRAPHIC CONTENT  Videos show the black, cancer-ridden lungs of a heavy smoker, failing to inflate This is compared to the healthy, red-coloured lungs of a non-smoker The non-smokers’ lungs filled to full

Calcium-based MRI sensor enables more sensitive brain imaging: System detects direct signals of neural activity; could reveal patterns underlying behavior

MIT neuroscientists have developed a new magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sensor that allows them to monitor neural activity deep within the brain by tracking calcium ions. Because calcium ions are directly linked to neuronal firing — unlike the changes in blood flow detected by other types of MRI, which provide an indirect signal — this

Using mathematical modeling and evolutionary principles important in treatment decisions: Moffitt researchers show continuous maximum dose and adaptive treatment approaches are effective strategies for different tumors

Cancer patients are commonly treated with the maximum dose they are able to withstand that does not cause too many toxic side effects. However, many patients become resistant to these treatments and develop cancer recurrence. Researchers at Moffitt Cancer Center are using mathematical modeling based on evolutionary principles to show that adaptive drug treatments based

52 ways to find peace of mind

A new book co-authored by a professor in the Department of Psychology offers 52 bite-sized chapters to help people navigate anxiety, stress and fear. According to the National Institute of Mental Health, 30 percent of U.S. adults experience an anxiety disorder (such as panic disorder or social anxiety disorder) at some point in their lifetime.

Cancer patients set to benefit from world’s largest surgery study

Improved care for patients undergoing cancer surgery is the focus of a pioneering worldwide study. Doctors say the initiative—funded by the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) – will enable them to gauge surgery quality across the globe and highlight ways to improve patient care. Some 16 million people worldwide will be diagnosed with cancer

When your immune system meddles in your love life

About a decade ago, evolutionary psychologists suggested that humans have evolved a first line of defense against disease: a behavioural immune system (BIS). This system is thought to be unconsciously activated, to varying degrees, when an individual perceives, rightly or wrongly, that there is a threat of disease. Although we cannot see microorganisms with our

Survey: Medical marijuana could reduce opioid use in older adults

A questionnaire of older men and women suffering from chronic pain who were given medical marijuana found that the drug significantly reduced pain and their need for opioid painkillers, Northwell Health researchers report. The results of the study, “Older Adults’ Use of Medical Marijuana for Chronic Pain: A Multisite Community-Based Survey,” are scheduled to be