Scott receives lifetime achievement award from laboratory medicine society

Mitchell G. Scott, PhD, a professor of pathology and immunology at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, has received the Outstanding Lifetime Achievement Award in Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine from the American Association for Clinical Chemistry. The award, which recognizes people who have made significant contributions to the field of laboratory medicine

The Best Foods for Maintaining Good Gut Health

Most people think of exercise or clean eating when it comes to their health. Many forget to care for their gut. No, we’re not talking about sit-ups; we’re talking about the bacteria inside your digestive tract. Improving your health may be a matter of the good versus bad bacteria inside you. Choosing foods high in

Risk for repeat concussion quantified for pediatric patients

(HealthDay)—A total of 16.2 percent of children with an index concussion experience at least one repeat concussion within two years, according to a study published online May 14 in The Journal of Pediatrics. Allison E. Curry, Ph.D., M.P.H., from the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, and colleagues queried electronic health records to identify a retrospective cohort

Older adults expect to lose brain power, but most don’t ask doctors how to prevent dementia: Many in their 50s and early 60s buy supplements or do puzzles in hopes of protecting brain health, but may miss out on effective strategies

Many Americans in their 50s and early 60s are worried about declining brain health, especially if they have loved ones with memory loss and dementia, a new national poll finds. But while the majority of those polled say they take supplements or do puzzles in an effort to stave off brain decline, very few of

New drug could help treat neonatal seizures

A new drug that inhibits neonatal seizures in rodent models could open up new avenues for the treatment of epilepsy in human newborns. Researchers have identified that gluconate—a small organic compound found in fruit and honey—acts as an anticonvulsant, inhibiting seizures by targeting the activity of channels that control the flow of chloride ions in

Artificial intelligence tool vastly scales up Alzheimer’s research: Machine learning tool automates pathologists’ work to identify disease markers

Researchers at UC Davis and UC San Francisco have found a way to teach a computer to precisely detect one of the hallmarks of Alzheimer’s disease in human brain tissue, delivering a proof of concept for a machine-learning approach to distinguishing critical markers of the disease. Amyloid plaques are clumps of protein fragments in the

3-D images reveal how infants’ heads change shape during birth

Using Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), scientists have captured 3-D images that show how infants’ brains and skulls change shape as they move through the birth canal just before delivery. Olivier Ami of Auvergne University in Clermont Ferrand, France, and colleagues present these findings in the open access journal PLOS ONE on May 15, 2019. Doctors

Worldwide prevalence of eating disorders increased since 2000

(HealthDay)—Eating disorders are highly prevalent worldwide, especially among women, according to research published in the May issue of the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. Marie Galmiche, from Normandy Rouen University in France, and colleagues conducted a systematic literature review (2000 to 2018) to identify studies examining the prevalence of eating disorders and assess trends. The

Slimming: These cheese varieties will help with the diet

Study shows that cheese can help you lose weight Hard to believe, but true: An Irish study showed that protein-containing foods such as cheese can help you lose weight. Cheese is also according to scientific findings, much healthier than generally believed. But what’s with the cholesterol? To properly remove Health experts warn again and again

Guess Why All Your Fave Celeb Moms Are Twinning

If you spent your post-Mother’s Day brunch intermittently napping on the couch and scrolling through Instagram, you’re not alone (Bloody Marys and Eggs Benedict are basically Ambien). That also means you may have noticed something a little strange on your IG feed – all of your fave celeb moms were wearing the same thing! It’s

Detecting dementia’s damaging effects before it’s too late

Scientists might have found an early detection method for some forms of dementia, according to new research by the University of Arizona and the University of Toronto’s Baycrest Health Sciences Centre. According to the study published in the journal Neuropsychologia last month, patients with a rare neurodegenerative brain disorder called Primary Progressive Aphasia, or PPA,