Tag: A

Sniffles and sneezes: A Q&A about allergies with Dr. Ryan Steele

With allergy season upon us, YaleNews spoke to Dr. Ryan Steele, instructor of clinical medicine at Yale School of Medicine, about the current season, prevention, treatments, and other facts allergy sufferers need to know. When he’s not treating patients at Yale Health or the Yale New Haven Health Interventional Immunology Center, Steele teaches allergy and

How a woman in Arizona woke up with British accent

Rare syndrome causes woman to wake up with a foreign accent Medical Mysteries and Marvels: An American woman in Arizona goes to sleep with a headache and wakes up with a British accent. Michelle Myers is a woman from Arizona who’s never left the country. But although Myers used to speak like any other American,

Population health: A rapidly evolving discipline in US academic medicine

Leaders from department-level initiatives across the U.S. weigh in on how academic medicine is embracing population health and the opportunities med schools have to make an impact, according to a new analysis published in JAMA Network Open. Produced by a working group of chairs from nine population-focused medical school departments, the qualitative study reviewed areas

Discovery of a host mRNA that inhibits immune functions of antiviral protein RIG-I

Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a hepatotropic virus, with about 80 million chronic infections confirmed worldwide. HCV infection leads to the development of chronic hepatitis, cirrhosis, and in some instances, hepatocellular carcinoma. The recent development of highly potent direct-acting antiviral drugs (DAAs), targeting viral proteins, facilitates virus elimination in >90 percent of treated individuals. However,

Gene editing for recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa: A little bit closer to clinical applications

A group of researchers from the Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red de Enfermedades Raras (CIBERER) (Biomedical Research Networking Centre on Rare Diseases), Universidad Carlos III de Madrid (UC3M), the Centro de Investigaciones Energéticas, Medioambientales y Tecnológicas (CIEMAT) (Research Center for Energy, Environmental and Technology), and the Instituto de Investigación Sanitaria Fundación Jiménez Díaz (IIS-FJD)

New tools and strategies for tuberculosis diagnosis, care, and elimination: A PLOS Medicine special

This week, publication of a special issue on tuberculosis (TB) begins in PLOS Medicine, advised by guest editors Richard Chaisson of Johns Hopkins University, Claudia Denkinger of the University of Heidelberg, and Mark Hatherill of the South African Tuberculosis Vaccine Institute. An estimated 10 million people developed tuberculosis (TB) and 1.6 million died of TB

A soft spot for stem cells helps cornea healing

New research led by scientists at Newcastle University, UK reveals a potential revolutionary way to treat eye injuries and prevent blindness—by softening the tissue hosting the stem cells which then helps repair wounds, inside the body. The team discovered that the simple application of a tissue-softening enzyme, collagenase, prevents the loss of corneal stem cells

A Mozart playlist improved mortality in epileptic mice, study finds

A Mozart playlist improved mortality in epileptic mice, surprising study finds 80% of epileptic mice exposed to Mozart survived by the end of the 21-day study Only 50% of control epileptic mice, who were not exposed to music, survived The researchers at Utah said the findings were ‘fascinating’, ‘unexpected’, and ‘a huge discovery’  e-mail View

Drug-resistant tuberculosis: A new study offers new hope

Tuberculosis (TB) is the leading cause of death in the world from a single infectious disease, causing more deaths than HIV/AIDS. In 2017, 10 million people developed TB disease globally and an estimated 1.6 million died. One of the biggest blocks to beating the epidemic is the growing resistance to drugs that have previously cured

Blue Brain solves a century-old neuroscience problem

A team led by Lida Kanari now reports a new system for distinguishing cell types in the brain, an algorithmic classification method that the researchers say will benefit the entire field of neuroscience. Blue Brain founder Professor Henry Markram says, “For nearly 100 years, scientists have been trying to name cells. They have been describing