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Patients at risk of coverage denial

Researchers at Brigham and Women’s Hospital analyzed a national sample of Emergency Department visits between 2011-15 to determine what proportion of them could be denied coverage if commercial insurers across the U.S. adopted the policy of a large national insurer, Anthem, Inc., to potentially deny coverage, after the visit, based on ED discharge diagnoses. Researchers

Governments to discuss tackling tuberculosis at UN summit

Governments from around the world will gather Wednesday to discuss the persistent scourge of tuberculosis, which last year claimed more lives than any other communicable disease. About 1.3 million people worldwide died of TB in 2017. A further 300,000 people with both HIV and TB died in last year, according to World Health Organization figures

Total diabetes at 14 percent in U.S. adults for 2013-2016

(HealthDay)—The prevalence of diabetes was 14.0 percent among U.S. adults in 2013 to 2016, with prevalence of undiagnosed diabetes 4.3 percent, according to a September data brief published by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s National Center for Health Statistics. Nicholas D. Mendola, M.P.H., from the George Washington University Milken Institute School of

Coca-Cola looking at cannabis-infused drinks

Coca-Cola said Monday it is studying the use of a key ingredient in marijuana in “wellness beverages,” as a growing number of mainstream companies develop cannabis-infused drinks. “We have no interest in marijuana or cannabis,” Coca-Cola said in a statement. But iconic soft drink producer is “closely watching the growth of non-psychoactive CBD (cannabidiol) as

Children with food insecurity at risk for high blood pressure

Kids with food insecurity, meaning they lack good access to nutritional foods, were more likely to have high blood pressure than kids with secure access to food, according to a study presented at the American Heart Association’s Joint Hypertension 2018 Scientific Sessions. “High blood pressure—even in childhood—matters,” said study author Andrew Michael South, M.D., assistant

How to ‘jumpstart’ rhythmic breathing at birth

The common expression, ‘As easy as breathing,’ is truly misleading. Breathing, as it is performed by higher vertebrates, is a complex biological function involving many types of neurons. It requires chemosensory neurons to sense oxygen and carbon dioxide levels in the blood and motor neurons to control muscle movement. It also needs specialized neurons to

The Best Fall Snacks Available at Trader Joe's

It’s August and not quite fall yet, but we’re already pulling our flannel shirts out of our closets, brewing a fresh batch of fragrant tea and counting down the days until we can grab a PSL at Starbucks (the date is Aug. 28, ICYMI). And Trader Joe’s is well aware of our fall fever.  Trader

9 foods to help lower blood sugar at home

One way to control blood sugar is to eat a healthful diet. Generally, foods and drinks that the body absorbs slowly are best because they do not cause spikes and dips in blood sugar. The glycemic index (GI) measures the effects of specific foods on blood sugar levels. People looking to control their levels should

Glycans at the ‘I’ of the storm in humoral immunity and melanoma progression

Two new studies have unveiled how a peculiar molecule impacts how antibody-producing cells develop and function as well as how normal melanocytes progress to melanoma malignancy. “These findings on fundamental immunology and melanoma development originate from totally different areas of research, though have intersected at the bench,” said Charles Dimitroff, Ph.D., of the Department of

Pediatric ward noise at night exceeds recommended levels

(HealthDay)—Children and their mothers have poorer quality sleep in pediatric hospital wards than they do at home, and this may be due to significantly raised sound levels in the hospital, according to a study published online July 17 in the Archives of Disease in Childhood. Rosanna Bevan, B.M.B.S., from the University of Southampton in the

Warm handoffs do not improve attendance at behavioral health intake appointments

In programs that integrate behavioral health services into primary care, “warm handoffs,” in which primary care clinicians introduce patients to behavioral health professionals, are commonly used. Researchers at Boston Medical Center have found that warm handoffs are not associated with improved attendance at behavioral health intake appointments. It has been theorized that warm handoffs could