Tag: be

3-Drug Therapy Might Be Cystic Fibrosis ‘Breakthrough’

THURSDAY, Oct. 18, 2018 — In what researchers are calling a “breakthrough,” two preliminary trials have found that either of two triple-drug regimens could potentially benefit 90 percent of people with cystic fibrosis. The trials were short-term, finding that the drug combinations improved adult patients’ lung function over four weeks. But experts said they were

Going to bed with your ex might not be as bad you think

Conventional wisdom holds that people set themselves up for even greater heartache when they jump into bed with their ex-partner after a breakup. However, according to the findings of a study in Springer’s journal Archives of Sexual Behavior, having sex with an ex doesn’t seem to hinder moving on after the breakup. This is true

Genes, Not Diet, May Be Key to Gout Flare-Ups

THURSDAY, Oct. 11, 2018 — Although many people suffering from painful gout flare-ups point to diet as the culprit, new research suggests DNA plays a much bigger role. The findings challenge the long-held belief that diet is the major factor in gout, a joint disease that causes extreme pain and swelling. Gout is caused by

It Just Doesn’t Pay to Be Nice, Study Finds

THURSDAY, Oct. 11, 2018 — When it comes to money, nice people really are more likely to finish last, a new study suggests. Researchers analyzed data from more than 3 million people and found that those who were nice were at increased risk for bankruptcy and other financial problems. Why? They just don’t value money

'We wouldn't be making jokes about heart disease'

A 20-something sees a meme on Facebook, chuckles, and tags their friend. "Can't have seasonal depression if you're depressed all year 'round," the meme's text reads. Over the past few years, changes in the Facebook algorithm have led to feeds of most young people being taken over by memes commented on or "liked" by their

E-cigarettes should be used more actively to help smokers quit, experts recommend

“Ongoing nervousness” about the use of e-cigarettes in stop-smoking services can be a “significant” barrier to people finding support, research revealed during “Stoptober” shows. New research by the University of Exeter and University of Melbourne, funded by Cancer Research UK, suggests stop smoking services which are e-cigarette friendly should advertise this more openly, and says

Air pollution may be linked to heightened mouth cancer risk

High levels of air pollutants, especially fine particulate matter (PM2.5) and to a lesser extent, ozone, may be linked to a heightened risk of developing mouth cancer, suggests the first study of its kind, published online in the Journal of Investigative Medicine. The number of new cases, and deaths from, mouth cancer is increasing in

Diabetes, dementia can be deadly combination

(HealthDay)—The risk of death from dangerously low blood sugar is much higher among seniors who have both diabetes and dementia than those with diabetes alone, a new study finds. Researchers analyzed data from nearly 20,000 people aged 65 and older with type 1 or type 2 diabetes who were followed for up to five years

Heading a Soccer Ball Found to Be Riskier for Female Players

THURSDAY, Sept. 27, 2018 — Female soccer players exhibit more widespread evidence of microstructural white matter alteration than males, despite having similar exposure to heading, according to a study recently published in Radiology. Todd G. Rubin, from the Albert Einstein College of Medicine in Bronx, N.Y., and colleagues conducted a cross-sectional study involving 98 individuals

11 Vegan Thanksgiving Recipes You Won't Be Mad About Eating

Thanksgiving can be a stressful time for everybody—I’ll take “Unsolicited Questions About My Relationship Status’ for $200, Alex—but it’s especially tough when everyone at the table has different food preferences. The good news? There are so many delish vegan Thanksgiving recipes that will fit seamlessly into your spread. Staples like roasted Brussels sprouts and colorful

AHA: Low Literacy Levels Can Be a Silent Health Threat

FRIDAY, Sept. 14, 2018 (American Heart Association) — He kept it from family members, friends and employers. Some of Walter Washington’s children still don’t know their father struggles to read and write. But his doctors knew. The 64-year-old Dallas man told them because he didn’t want to risk taking the wrong dose of his diabetes

Widely used youth behaviour treatment may be ineffective: study

A long-established treatment used around the world to help troubled young people and their families tackle behavioural problems may not be as effective as its practitioners claim—a new study reveals. Functional Family Therapy (FFT) is a short-term, evidence-based intervention provided at over 270 sites worldwide—mostly within the US, but also in Belgium, Ireland, The Netherlands,

Chronic pain may be an important contributor to suicide

Chronic pain may be an important contributor to suicide. Nearly 9 percent of people who died by suicide in 18 states from 2003 to 2014 had documentation of chronic pain in their incident records. Findings from the National Violent Death Reporting System (NVDRS) are published in Annals of Internal Medicine. More than 25 million adults

Jet-air dryers should not be used in hospital toilets

Jet-air hand dryers in hospital toilets spread more germs than disposable paper towels and should not be used, say researchers. Writing in the Journal of Hospital Infection, they argue that the official guidance about how to prevent bacterial contamination in hospital buildings needs to be strengthened. At the moment, the official Department of Health guidance