Tag: better

California legislates more sleep for better health

Teenagers don’t get enough sleep, and California’s effort to fix the problem may serve as a wake-up call to other states’ lawmakers. A law recently signed by Gov. Gavin Newsom that mandates later start times for most students—no earlier than 8 a.m. in middle school and 8:30 a.m. in high school—is the first statewide response

Exam stress may not be fun, but it can help you get better grades

Two-thirds of young people experience levels of exam stress that mental health organization ReachOut describes as “worrying.” Research shows high levels of exam stress can interfere with attention and reduce working memory, leading to lower performance. Early experiences of anxiety and stress can also set a precedent for mental-health problems in adulthood. But how we

Exploring better fatty liver remedies

Obesity often leads to increased accumulation of fat in the liver, which can, over time, result in diabetes, poor liver function, and liver cancer. It’s increasingly a problem affecting obese children and young people who need exercise and good diet—but are not likely to embrace those solutions, wanting a pill instead to remedy the fatty

Blood pressure outside of clinic may better predict outcomes in black patients

(HealthDay)—Among African-Americans, higher daytime and nighttime systolic blood pressure (SBP) is associated with an increased risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD) events and all-cause mortality independent of blood pressure (BP) levels measured in the clinic, according to a study published online Aug. 14 in JAMA Cardiology. Yuichiro Yano, M.D., Ph.D., from Duke University in Durham, North

Researchers improve classification of pancreatic cancer to better predict patient outcomes

Researchers at the University of Toronto and University Health Network have found that standard pathology grading for the most common type of pancreatic cancer can be improved to better predict patient outcomes. The research shows that conventional, histological analysis of pancreatic tumours—based in part on morphology, or shape and structure—can better predict outcomes by taking

Targeting inflammation to better understand dangerous blood clots

It’s the third deadliest cardiovascular diagnosis, but doctors are still often stumped to explain why 40% of patients experience unprovoked venous thromboembolism (VTE). And after a patient has dealt with these dangerous blood clots once, a second and subsequent events become much more likely. New research from a team of University of Michigan scientists may

New stimulant formulations emerging to better treat ADHD

A comprehensive new review of the expanding scope of stimulants available to treat attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) serves as a valuable guide to clinicians as they choose from among the many new drug formulations and technologies available to treat this complex disorder. The wide-ranging review is published in the Journal of Child and Adolescent

Menopause Makes Me a Better Mom

“Are you really crying?” my daughter asked as we read together. She was 8 and I was approaching 48 — I’m almost 40 years older than my kid, just as my mother was 40 years older than me. I remembered how difficult middle age had been for my mother. And for me, too, menopause was lurking

HIV/tuberculosis co-infection: Tunneling towards better diagnosis

1.2 million people in the world are co-infected by HIV-1 and Mycobacterium tuberculosis. This combination is deadly: It makes patient diagnosis and treatment difficult, and increases the pathogenicity of these two infectious agents. An international team led by researchers at the CNRS and Inserm have revealed that in the presence of tuberculosis, HIV-1 moves from

Early intensive therapy for multiple sclerosis leads to better long-term outcomes, despite being perceived as high risk

New findings by researchers at Cardiff University suggest that intensive therapy during the early stages of multiple sclerosis (MS) leads to better long-term outcomes for patients, despite it often being viewed as a riskier option than other first line treatments. Dr. Emma Tallantyre, from Cardiff University’s Division of Psychological Medicine and Clinical Neurosciences, said: “Over

Alcohol use disorder: A step toward better treatment?

A doctor diagnoses alcohol use disorder (AUD) when an individual’s use of alcohol becomes compulsive. Someone with AUD feels intense cravings for alcohol and, when none has been consumed, experiences symptoms of withdrawal. According to the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, there are around 16 million people in the United States with AUD.