Tag: brain

How meaning is represented in the human brain

Representations reflecting non-linguistic experience have been detected in brain activity during reading in study of healthy, native English speakers published in JNeurosci. The research brings us one step closer to a more complete characterization of human language. Words and their relationship to one’s experience are thought to be combined in the brain to enable understanding

Brain implant restores visual perception to the blind

Seven years ago, Jason Esterhuizen was in a horrific car crash that destroyed his eyes, plunging him into total darkness. Today, he’s regained visual perception and more independence, thanks to an experimental device implanted in his brain by researchers at UCLA Health. “Now I can do things that I couldn’t do before,” said Esterhuizen, 30,

Slowing brain rhythms can serve as a marker for delirium and its clinical outcomes

An EEG (electroencephalogram) can provide a valuable biomarker for detecting delirium, a serious mental disturbance that is often underrecognized, as well as predicting poor clinical outcomes, researchers from Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) have found. In a paper published in Neurology, the team reported that the generalized slowing of brain rhythms, shown as abnormal theta or

The birth of vision from the retina to the brain

How is the retina formed? And how do neurons differentiate to become individual components of the visual system? By focusing on the early stages of this complex process, researchers at the University of Geneva (UNIGE), Switzerland, in collaboration with the École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), have identified the genetic programs governing the birth of

White matter affects how people respond to brain stimulation therapy aimed at depression and stroke

White matter affects how people respond to brain stimulation therapy aimed at depression and stroke Tiny changes in the microscopic structure of the human brain may affect how patients respond to an emerging therapy for neurological problems. The technique, called non-invasive electrical brain stimulation, involves applying an electrical current to the surface of a patient’s

How the brain ‘approximates’ without actually counting

From the time of early infancy, humans are endowed with the capacity to approximate the number of objects in their visual field, an ability that continues throughout life and may underlie the development of more complex mathematical skills. For years, scientists have explored how people estimate numerical quantities without physically counting objects one by one,

Non-invasive electrical stimulation alters blood flow in brain tumors

In a first-of-its kind study, neurologists at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC) tested the use of non-invasive electrical stimulation as a novel therapeutic approach to brain tumors. In an experiment published in Science Advances, the scientists—led by Emiliano Santarnecchi, Ph.D., principal investigator at the Berenson-Allen Center For Non-Invasive Brain Stimulation at BIDMC—demonstrated that applying

How the brain distinguishes between voice and sound

Is the brain capable of distinguishing a voice from the specific sounds it utters? In an attempt to answer this question, researchers from the University of Geneva (UNIGE), Switzerland, – in collaboration with the University of Maastricht, the Netherlands—devised pseudo-words (words without meaning) spoken by three voices with different pitches. Their aim? To observe how

Alzheimer’s disease: Sex affects tau accumulation in the brain

The strongest genetic risk factor for Alzheimer’s disease is the apolipoprotein E type 4 allele (ApoE ε4). Research presented by Manish Paranjpe at the 2019 Annual Meeting of the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging (SNMMI) used positron emission tomography (PET) to show that women who are ApoE ε4 carriers and already experiencing mild