Tag: Brains

Study illuminates the brain’s inner workings

Like instruments in an orchestra, different parts of the human brain work together to help us perform the functions of daily life, ranging from breathing and sleeping to reading, walking and learning. But which areas of the brain work in harmony to accomplish certain types of tasks? And how does this coordination vary from person

How socioeconomic status shapes developing brains

The relationship between socioeconomic status (SES) and brain anatomy is mostly stable from childhood to early adulthood, according to a longitudinal neuroimaging study of more than 600 healthy young people published in JNeurosci. This finding draws attention to the importance of preschool life as a period when associations between SES and brain organization may first

Does our environment affect the genes in our brains?

Is there a link between differences in IQ test performance and the activity of certain genes? Researchers from Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin have shown that modifications in the structure of a specific gene have a negative impact on individual test performance. This suggests that environmentally induced epigenetic changes to our genetic material have a greater

The brain’s tiny thrill-seekers

Microglia, the immune cells of the central nervous system, differ in male and female mice. MDC researchers have reported on the sex-specific features in Cell Reports. Their findings could change how we treat neurological diseases. Microglia monitor the brain’s health around the clock, much like a battalion of tiny soldiers. When the cells sense pathogens

Soccer heading worse for women’s brains than for men’s

Women’s brains are much more vulnerable than men’s to injury from repeated soccer heading, according to a new study by researchers at Albert Einstein College of Medicine, part of Montefiore. The study found that regions of damaged brain tissue were five times more extensive in female soccer players than in males, suggesting that sex-specific guidelines

Autism spectrum disorder linked to shape of brain’s cerebellum

Structural differences in the cerebellum may be linked to some aspects of autism spectrum disorder, according to a neuroimaging study from Columbia University Irving Medical Center (CUIMC). The findings were published online today in PLOS ONE. The cerebellum—which means ‘little brain’ in Latin—constitutes only 10 percent of the brain’s total volume, though it contains 80

Women Have More Active Brains Than Men, According To Science

Females have significantly more active brains than men in terms of blood flow in specific areas of the brain, according to a recent study published in the Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease. A team at Amen Clinics in California studied 46,034 brain-imaging scans through SPECT (single photon emission computed tomography), a technology used to track blood