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The disease affecting Australians that should have disappeared by now

Rheumatic heart disease is a disease which shouldn’t exist anymore. Caused by an abnormal immune reaction to Strep A infection of the skin and throat, it’s an entirely preventable condition which, left untreated, can spiral into deadly or debilitating complications including stroke, heart rhythm abnormalities, and heart failure. Left untreated, an abnormal immune reaction to Strep

Nation’s first cardiac ablation with mapping system recently cleared by the FDA performed at Penn Medicine

After eight years of failed treatment for persistent atrial fibrillation (AF), Janet Szilagyi, 78 of Clayton, New Jersey, became the first patient in the United States to undergo cardiac ablation—a procedure in which an electrophysiologist will scar or destroy tissue in the heart that’s allowing incorrect electrical signals to cause an abnormal heart rhythm—using an

Cancer drug helps treat tuberculosis by restoring leaky blood vessels

Biomedical engineers have discovered an unlikely potential ally in the global fight against tuberculosis—an FDA-approved drug originally designed to treat cancer. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are naturally produced by animals to break down connective tissue for a wide array of biological processes such as wound repair, growth and tissue development. Many diseases, however, can hijack these

Spectacle lens slows myopic progression by 60 percent

The Defocus Incorporated Multiple Segments (DIMS) Spectacle Lens developed by the Hong Kong Polytechnic University (PolyU) slowed down myopia progress by 60 percent in participating children; myopic progression halted completely in 21.5 percent of subjects. This lens will be launched in summer 2018, offering a non-contact, spectacle lens solution to myopic children. The lens was

U.S. heart disease rates falling, but gains vary by state

(HealthDay)—The overall rate of heart disease in the United States has declined 38 percent since 1990, a new report shows. Not every state has benefited equally, however. Between 2010 and 2016, 12 states actually saw their heart disease rates begin to creep up again, the data showed. And although the United States as a whole