Tag: can

Can a dose of strong cocoa help people with Raynaud’s disease?

People with a circulation condition called Primary Raynaud’s are being asked to help researchers at the University of Nottingham find out whether antioxidant compounds in cocoa can help alleviate symptoms. Raynaud’s is a circulatory condition in which the small blood vessels in the fingers or toes constrict in response to the cold. It can be

How schools can optimise support for children with ADHD

New research gives the clearest guidance yet on how schools can best support children with ADHD to improve symptoms and maximise their academic outcomes. The study, led by the University of Exeter and involving researchers at the EPPI-Centre (University College London), undertook a systematic review which analysed all available research into non-medication measures to support

Preeclampsia: We can do more

Each year, more than 10,000 pregnant women in Australia suffer from preeclampsia and 30,000 die from it on a global level. The condition, characterized by high blood pressure, can be fatal and have long-term health effects for both mothers and babies. It causes the death of 780 babies each day. These numbers, according to Dean

Gut bacteria and psoriasis: Can probiotics help?

Psoriasis is an autoimmune disease, which means that it causes the immune system to mistakenly attacks healthy cells. Probiotics help to maintain a good balance of healthful gut bacteria. Researchers believe that probiotics can have a positive impact on controlling, and even preventing, chronic inflammation caused by psoriasis. This article will look at the evidence

How humour can reduce workplace stress

Research from ANU has found a bit of humour at work can help employees deal with workplace aggression and stressful situations. Lead researcher Dr. David Cheng of the ANU College of Business and Economics said workplace aggression and bullying is a widespread problem which impacts the mental health of victims and the ramifications can be

Diabetes, dementia can be deadly combination

(HealthDay)—The risk of death from dangerously low blood sugar is much higher among seniors who have both diabetes and dementia than those with diabetes alone, a new study finds. Researchers analyzed data from nearly 20,000 people aged 65 and older with type 1 or type 2 diabetes who were followed for up to five years

Just Witnessing School Violence Can Leave Psychic Scars

FRIDAY, Sept. 28, 2018 — For middle school students, witnessing school violence can be as bad as being bullied, new research suggests. An international team of researchers found that young witnesses face many of the same challenges later on as those who are direct victims of campus violence. Notably, eighth-grade witnesses are at higher risk

How the smell of disease can affect healthy people

Disease and infection can alter bodily odor. This mechanism is an important tool, albeit one that we are not usually aware of, in guiding social interactions self-preservation mechanisms. If we can “sense” that a stranger on the bus has a cold, we may instinctively avoid sitting down next to them. Previous research has shown that

AHA: Low Literacy Levels Can Be a Silent Health Threat

FRIDAY, Sept. 14, 2018 (American Heart Association) — He kept it from family members, friends and employers. Some of Walter Washington’s children still don’t know their father struggles to read and write. But his doctors knew. The 64-year-old Dallas man told them because he didn’t want to risk taking the wrong dose of his diabetes

Yes, You Really Can Eat Kiwi Skin

Taking a bite of a whole apple is a no-brainer—the skin is all shiny, colorful, and pretty! But a kiwi? That poop-brown, kinda hairy fruit? No, thanks. Apparently, that’s exactly what you’re supposed to do though. “Yes, it is safe to eat the skin of kiwi,” says Maggie Moon, R.D., and author of The MIND

Can changing our views on death improve how we live our lives?

Life is not possible without death and yet, modern medicine has waged an unending war against death. Now, a Notre Dame Institute for Advanced Study (NDIAS) residential fellow is exploring how the concept of kenosis might create a common ground for personal growth, mutual understanding, civil discourse and productive policymaking in today’s diverse and polarized

Even a small amount of medical debt can trigger headaches

It doesn’t take a huge unpaid medical bill to make a collection agency come calling … and calling. Researchers found in a study of credit reports that more than 2 percent of adults had medical bills under $200 sent to a collections agency. Over half of the annual medical collections were for less than $600,

You Can Now Get Paid to Eat Avocados for 6 Months

Avocado fiends, if you could get paid eating avocados, would you do it? Because the opportunity has finally arrived thanks to a researcher at the Loma Linda University in Southern California. Dr. Joan Sabaté, who directs the Center for Nutrition, Lifestyle and Disease Prevention at the university, is looking for 250 people to eat a

Eye disease can cause blindness, and it’s on the rise

A new study into recent cases of ocular syphilis warns increasing numbers of people are at risk of permanent damage to their vision. Researchers from the University of Sao Paulo in Brazil and Flinders University, led by Matthew Flinders Distinguished Professor of Ophthalmology Justine Smith, analysed cases at four medical centres in Brazil over two

Unnecessary heart procedures can be avoided with non-invasive test

Unnecessary heart procedures can be avoided with a non-invasive test, according to late breaking research presented today at ESC Congress 2018 and published in Journal of the American College of Cardiology. Dr. Bjarne Linde Norgaard, principal investigator, of Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark, said: “This study showed that a non-invasive method can be used to identify

New imaging technique can spot tuberculosis infection in an hour

Guided by glowing bacteria, researchers have devised an imaging technique that can diagnose live tuberculosis in an hour and help monitor the efficacy of treatments. That’s particularly critical because many TB strains have evolved defenses against standard treatments. Jianghong Rao, PhD, a professor of radiology at Stanford who led the work, says that speedy TB