Tag: can

Artificial intelligence can diagnose PTSD by analyzing voices

A specially designed computer program can help diagnose post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in veterans by analyzing their voices, a new study finds. Published online April 22 in the journal Depression and Anxiety, the study found that an artificial intelligence tool can distinguish—with 89 percent accuracy—between the voices of those with or without PTSD. “Our findings

Yes, You Really Can Achieve Multiple Orgasms

For some women, having multiple orgasms is the sexual Mount Everest of pleasure. However, Stella Harris, Intimacy Educator, Sex Coach, and author of Tongue Tied: Untangling Communication in Sex, Kink, and Relationships, tells SheKnows that multiple orgasms can be a bit of a misnomer. “The orgasms don’t necessarily happen one right after the other,” she

Human protein produced in CHO-cells can save donor blood

Alpha-1-antitrypsin is a protein produced by the liver. The protein gets secreted to the blood stream, where it circulates the body to protect the lungs. However, some people are born with genetic disorders that hinders production of this protein. These patients can suffer from decreased lung function, liver diseases and shortness of breath. In the

Smart wrist-worn device can alert about dangerous health conditions

Although smart wristbands are popular fashion gadgets for monitoring heart rate and physical activity, they are usually not sophisticated enough to provide specific and accurate information about potential health problems of the wearer. Kaunas University of Technology (KTU), Lithuania researchers are developing a smart wrist-worn device for monitoring of atrial fibrillation – a condition, which

Unusual abdominal symptoms for a heart attack pain can be

Non-specific complaints in the case of a heart attack recognize Heart attack in Germany is still the most common cause of death. Many heart attack deaths are preventable, if the person comes at an opportune time in treatment. Therefore, it is very important that the symptoms are correctly interpreted, because it is not always a

Positivity can transform the healthcare workplace

Positivity can transform the healthcare workplace, according to a professor at Binghamton University, State University of New York. Nina Flanagan, clinical professor of nursing and program coordinator of the Adult-Gerontological Nursing Program at Binghamton University’s Decker School of Nursing, in researching the topic of positivity in the workplace, discovered that a positive mindset is vital

Don’t Panic: How parents can deal with internet hoaxes

The latest parental panic on social media—over a purported challenge for kids to complete harmful tasks—elevates the importance of establishing an open dialogue with children and taking advantage of online parental controls. Warnings about the “Momo challenge” swept Facebook and other social media in recent days, as parents worried about purported videos that encourage children

Why a blow to the chest can kill or save you

A blow to the chest can have highly contrasting effects. For instance, some baseball players have died after being hit in the chest by a baseball, while patients undergoing fatal cardiac tachyarrhythmias have been saved by an appropriately timed thump to the chest. Scientists know that such blows create rapid strains on heart tissue, but

Can a guinea pig really ease your anxiety?

Can a guinea pig really ease your anxiety? Thousands of Britons are turning to ‘panic pets’ to help ease depression and other mental health issues Tammy Lovell, 42, going through a tough divorce and became a single mother  She turned to looking at her daughter’s guinea pigs playing to calm her down  She carves out at

Can being born blind protect people from schizophrenia?

A study carried out by The University of Western Australia has provided compelling evidence that congenital/early cortical blindness – that is when people are blind from birth or shortly after—is protective against schizophrenia. The unusual discovery has fascinated scientists and may lead to a better understanding of what causes schizophrenia – a question that has

Coeliac disease can cause irreversible changes to immune cells

Immune cells in the bowel of people who suffer with coeliac disease are permanently replaced by a new subset of cells that promote inflammation, suggests a new study involving researchers at Cardiff University. This permanent ‘immunological scarring’ lays the foundation for the disease to progress and could have long-term implications for gut health in affected

12 Easy Recipes You Can Serve in a Bread Bowl

Whether your first time was at a party or in your neighborhood Panera, I’m willing to bet you remember that first bread bowl experience. Admittedly a bread bowl isn’t the most convenient vessel for soups and dips — you kinda need to finish the contents before you can break into the soaked, doughy bowl, which

What celebrity trainers do differently (that you can do, too)

Before personal trainer Luke Zocchi got his hands on Chris Hemsworth, the actor was “skinny-fat”. “He had a bit of puppy fat still – he wasn’t completely amazing,” Zocchi, an amateur boxer-turned-trainer, says about his client and lifelong friend. “He looked a bit 'skinny-fat'. I took him from skinny and fat to … shredded.” Luke Zocchi

OCT Imaging Needle Can Detect Blood Vessels in Neurosurgery

THURSDAY, Dec. 20, 2018 — A miniaturized optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging needle can detect blood vessels intraoperatively in the human brain in vivo, according to a study published online Dec. 19 in Science Advances. Hari Ramakonar, M.B.B.S., from Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital in Nedlands, Australia, and colleagues developed an imaging needle that is able

Simply receiving DNA test results can alter your physiology

Over the years, researchers have identified genetic risk factors for a range of conditions. As genetic testing has become quicker, more cost-effective, and increasingly accurate, DNA tests have become relatively common. Each year, millions of people access information about their genetic risk of developing conditions such as Alzheimer’s. Some estimate that in 2017 alone, 1