Tag: Cancer

Editing RNA delivers precision strike on triple-negative breast cancer

The move toward targeted anti-cancer treatments has produced better outcomes with fewer side-effects for many breast cancer patients. But so far, advances in precision medicine haven’t reached people diagnosed with so-called triple-negative breast cancer. An innovative compound developed in the lab of Scripps Research chemist Matthew D. Disney, Ph.D., offers a new potential route to

Zika virus’ key into brain cells ID’d, leveraged to block infection and kill cancer cells

Zika virus infection can stunt neonatal brain development, a condition known as microcephaly, in which babies are born with abnormally small heads. To determine how best to prevent and treat the viral infection, scientists first need to understand how the pathogen gets inside brain cells. Employing different approaches to answer different questions, two research teams

Schoolgirl beat bone cancer after doctors reattached leg BACKWARDS

Girl, nine, who beat bone cancer after doctors amputated and reattached her leg BACKWARDS now enjoys cycling, dancing and roller-skating Amelia Eldred, from Staffordshire, diagnosed with osteosarcoma in August 2017  Had a rotationplasty, in which doctors amputated her knee and part of her leg They then re-attached foot and heel joints back to front, to

Disorderly DNA helps cancer cells evade treatment

Each cell in the human body holds a full two meters of DNA. In order for that DNA to fit into the cell nucleus—a cozy space just one hundredth of a millimeter of space—it needs to be packed extremely tight. A new Northwestern University study has discovered that the packing of the three-dimensional genome structure,

Public insurance tied to lower cancer survival in young patients

(HealthDay)—Young, low-income patients with bone or soft tissue sarcomas have decreased overall survival (OS), regardless of disease stage at presentation, according to a study published online Dec. 15 in Cancer Medicine. Neela L. Penumarthy, M.D., from Seattle Children’s Hospital, and colleagues used data from the University of California San Francisco Cancer Registry to identify patients

Free tool simplifies cancer research

Every cell contains a vast number of proteins, each of which has a specific function, for example, as a receptor for another molecule or an enzyme that catalyzes chemical reactions. Disorders of such mechanisms can seriously affect a cell and cause diseases such as cancer, in which the sick cell functions fundamentally differently from a

Residual cancer burden after neoadjuvant therapy can accurately predict breast cancer survival

Researchers from The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center today reported results from a pooled analysis of more than 5,100 breast cancer patients that found residual cancer burden (RCB) continuous index and classification were independently and strongly prognostic for all breast cancer phenotypes. The study’s results were presented by W. Fraser Symmans, M.D., professor

Metabolic adaptation ensures survival of colon cancer cells

Colon cancer cells deficient in p53, one of the most important control proteins in cell growth, activate a particular metabolic pathway to adapt to the lack of oxygen and nutrients inside the tumor. Statins, which are often prescribed to lower cholesterol, block this metabolic pathway and cause the cancer cells to die, as scientists from

Recruitment of miR-8080 by luteolin inhibits AR-V7 in castration-resistant prostate cancer

Prostate cancer is the most common noncutaneous malignancy in the United States and is responsible for many male deaths. The development of prostate carcinogenesis is initially androgen-dependent. However, the progression of castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) following androgen deprivation therapy is a major clinical problem. Although enzalutamide and abiraterone have been approved for CRPC hormone therapy,