Tag: Early

Early PSA testing could help predict prostate cancer among black men

Prostate cancer is the second most common cancer in American men. But black men bear a disproportionate burden of its effects. It’s more common—and more than twice as deadly—among black men compared to their white counterparts. Yet the United States Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommendations for prostate cancer screening do not differentiate for race,

New cancer vaccine shows early promise for patients with HER2-positive cancers

Treatment with a HER2-targeted therapeutic cancer vaccine provided clinical benefit to several patients with metastatic HER2-positive cancers who had not previously been treated with a HER2-targeted therapeutic, according to data from a phase I clinical trial presented at the Fourth CRI-CIMT-EATI-AACR International Cancer Immunotherapy Conference: Translating Science into Survival, held Sept. 30-Oct. 3. Among 11

New developments in EEG brain scans could help spot mental disorders early

Patients suffering from mental and neurological disorders, including autism, ADHD and dementia, could benefit from new developments in brain scanning technology, according to a new study published in The Neurodiagnostic Journal. Recent advances in electroencephalography (EEG) technology, which may one day be used to measure brain function throughout a patient’s lifespan, could encourage earlier diagnoses

Better assessments for early age-related macular degeneration

The European MACUSTAR consortium is conducting a multi-country clinical study on age-related macular degeneration (AMD) coordinated by the University of Bonn. The clinical study focuses on the intermediate stage of the disease, in which a person’s vision under low-light and low-contrast conditions is impaired. Throughout Europe, a total of 20 study centers will recruit and

Recognizing early childhood speech problems

(HealthDay)—You eagerly await baby’s first words and delight at his growing vocabulary. But that excitement may cause you to miss speech problems that should be corrected quickly. According to the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA), many parents don’t know common warning signs of speech problems or that they’re easier to correct before age 4. At 12

Scans Help Spot Heart Trouble Early in People With Lupus

THURSDAY, Aug. 2, 2018 — Heart disease is a leading cause of death in patients with the autoimmune illness lupus. Now, research suggests high-tech scans can spot cardiac issues early. The scans can detect heart abnormalities even before patients have any symptoms, Chinese researchers say. “Our findings may affect current lupus diagnostics and treatment —

Wearable, at-home patch could spot your A-fib early

(HealthDay)—The common but dangerous heart rhythm disorder known as atrial fibrillation—or a-fib—can go undetected for years. Now, research suggests a high-tech, wearable patch might spot the condition early. Use of the Zio XT wireless patch, made by iRhythm, produced “an almost threefold improvement in the rate of diagnosis of a-fib in those actively monitored compared

Early life exposure to famine can lead to depression

New research from the University of Georgia reveals that exposure to famine during specific moments in early life is associated with depression later in life. “Nutrition deprivation and stress are important risk factors for depression particularly during periods in early life,” said lead author Changwei Li, assistant professor of epidemiology and biostatistics at UGA’s College

Early source of irritable bowel syndrome discovered

Michigan State University scientists have identified an early cause of intestinal inflammation, one of the first stages of inflammatory bowel disease and irritable bowel syndrome, which afflict around 11 percent of the world’s population. The discovery, featured in the current issue of Cellular and Molecular Gastroenterology and Hepatology, points to communication between sensory neurons in

Blood test shows potential for early detection of lung cancer

A test that analyzes free-floating DNA in the blood may be able to detect early-stage lung cancer, a preliminary report from the ongoing Circulating Cell-Free Genome Atlas (CCGA) study suggests. The findings, from one of the first studies to explore whether sequencing blood-borne DNA is a feasible approach to the early cancer detection, will be