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Why Earth Day Matters for Kids

Show them Help clean up litter. Take recyclable materials to a recycling center (for more info on recycle do’s and don’ts, visit Waste Management’s website). Compost at home. Turn out lights when not in use. Don’t waste water. Reduce fuel emissions by walking whenever possible. Program the thermostat to be more energy-efficient. Reuse and repurpose

Group, telephone, guided CBT treatment effective for depression

(HealthDay)—Group, telephone, and guided self-help cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) formats are as effective as individual CBT for adult depression, according to research published online April 17 in JAMA Psychiatry. Pim Cuijpers, Ph.D., from Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, and colleagues conducted a network meta-analysis on randomized clinical trials of CBT for adult depression to examine the most

Wait, Are Negative-Calorie Foods For Real?

You’ve probably known someone who consumed insane amounts of celery because digesting it required more calories than the food contained. However, the idea of “negative calorie foods” is nothing more than a myth, according to a new study published in a pre-print publication, bioRxiv. In case you’re not familiar with the idea, some dieters believe

Cognitive behavioral therapy effective for prenatal insomnia

(HealthDay)—Cognitive behavioral therapy is an effective nonpharmacologic treatment for insomnia during pregnancy, according to a study published online April 5 in Obstetrics & Gynecology. Rachel Manber, Ph.D., from Stanford University in California, and colleagues evaluated the effectiveness of cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia during pregnancy among women (18 to 32 weeks of gestation) randomly assigned

Immune responses in Ebola survivors 2 years after infection provide clues for vaccine development

Scientists have discovered that 2 years after infection, West African Ebola survivors exhibit memory immune responses—including specific T cells against Ebola virus. They believe their discovery opens up the possibility of improving Ebola vaccines by boosting key immune cells needed for long-lasting protective immunity. The new research is being presented at this year’s European Congress

Gene editing for recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa: A little bit closer to clinical applications

A group of researchers from the Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red de Enfermedades Raras (CIBERER) (Biomedical Research Networking Centre on Rare Diseases), Universidad Carlos III de Madrid (UC3M), the Centro de Investigaciones Energéticas, Medioambientales y Tecnológicas (CIEMAT) (Research Center for Energy, Environmental and Technology), and the Instituto de Investigación Sanitaria Fundación Jiménez Díaz (IIS-FJD)

New tools and strategies for tuberculosis diagnosis, care, and elimination: A PLOS Medicine special

This week, publication of a special issue on tuberculosis (TB) begins in PLOS Medicine, advised by guest editors Richard Chaisson of Johns Hopkins University, Claudia Denkinger of the University of Heidelberg, and Mark Hatherill of the South African Tuberculosis Vaccine Institute. An estimated 10 million people developed tuberculosis (TB) and 1.6 million died of TB

A soft spot for stem cells helps cornea healing

New research led by scientists at Newcastle University, UK reveals a potential revolutionary way to treat eye injuries and prevent blindness—by softening the tissue hosting the stem cells which then helps repair wounds, inside the body. The team discovered that the simple application of a tissue-softening enzyme, collagenase, prevents the loss of corneal stem cells

New thermal ablation method for adenoma shows promise

Researchers from the USA (Kansas State University) and the Republic of Ireland (the National University of Ireland Galway) have completed a successful initial test of a new microwave thermal ablation technique, which could eventually be used to treat Conn’s syndrome. Conn’s syndrome occurs when a benign adrenal gland adenoma causes the production of excess aldosterone,

Doctors unclear on legal obligations in caring for patients with disability

(HealthDay)—Practicing physicians might not understand their legal responsibilities when caring for people with disability, which may contribute to inequalities in their care, according to a study published online April 1 in Health Affairs. Nicole D. Agaronnik, from Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston, and colleagues interviewed 20 practicing physicians across five specialties to examine the knowledge

Georgia student credits God for surviving brain injury: ‘Medical science can't explain my recovery’

Cole Burton, a 21-year-old Auburn University student, has made a miraculous recovery that his doctors say can only be explained by God’s intervention. (WAGA) A 21-year-old Auburn University student who suffered a traumatic brain injury has made a miraculous recovery that medical professionals are crediting to God. "My doctors have told me medical science can't explain my

Drinking water? There’s an app for that

The human body is well equipped to maintain an adequate level of hydration through the various biological feedback control mechanisms of homeostasis. However, this regulation relies on an adequate supply of water. While there is much mythology surrounding how many glasses of water we each must drink daily to stay healthy. Many people sip at

7 Reasons Raspberries Are So Good for You

Raspberries are enjoyable all year long, whether they’re fresh or frozen. These gorgeous gems aren’t just delicious and versatile; they have an impressive nutritional profile that makes them one of the healthiest choices in the produce aisle. Here are 7 health benefits of raspberries, plus simple ways to include both fresh and frozen options into meals and snacks.