Tag: how

Children ‘will be taught how to brush their teeth in SCHOOL’

Children ‘will be taught how to clean their teeth at SCHOOL’: Teachers could hand out brushes and toothpaste to pupils amid fears parents don’t supervise properly at home Dentists pull out rotten teeth from 1,000 under six-year-olds a month in the UK  Officials claim some parents may be unable to afford toothbrushes or paste   Health

How the brain distinguishes between voice and sound

Is the brain capable of distinguishing a voice from the specific sounds it utters? In an attempt to answer this question, researchers from the University of Geneva (UNIGE), Switzerland, – in collaboration with the University of Maastricht, the Netherlands—devised pseudo-words (words without meaning) spoken by three voices with different pitches. Their aim? To observe how

My Autism Diagnosis at Age 38 Drastically Changed How I Parent

What’s so important about diagnosis? Isn’t autism just a label? These are questions that people going through assessment for Autism Spectrum Disorders regularly hear — and they’re difficult to answer on the spot. For me, the diagnosis of having autism — a neurodevelopment disorder — came as a relief to me, mainly because I suddenly had a way to explain my extreme childhood behaviors (and having always been “the

How Finnish health tech startups are getting off the ground

Perhaps it’s no surprise that the startup scene is thriving in a culture known for braving harsh conditions. And while the startup world isn’t quite a wintry Finnish blizzard, it is known to test its founders and employees’ fortitude. Within the last decade Finnish digital health startups such as Meru and Kaiku have emerged as up-and-coming

How Rowing Melted 70 Pounds Off This Guy

“I was 30, more than 270 pounds, and it was a burden,” says Paul Eulette, now 33. Weight crept on slowly, starting in his teens, “partly from the emotional comfort I got from my family’s favorite Caribbean dishes and partly due to the cultural norm of overindulgence in food,” he says. By age 30, “I

How nurses bring clarity to the nature of social change

History provides an enhanced understanding of the factors that inform social policy. In the wider arena of public health and its influence on social change, the political and healing import of nursing cannot be ignored. In an editorial published in The American Journal of Public Health titled “The Great Flu and After: Why the Nurses?”

Here's How to Make Sangria That's Actually Good

So you don’t like sangria, huh? Totally understandable. But what you really mean is that you don’t like bad sangria and bad sangria is everywhere so you probably only know bad sangria as sangria. The reason why so much bad sangria exists as that people think that by throwing a bunch of cut-up fruit into

Here’s How to Get $3 Frappuccinos at Starbucks Today

Nothing gets me through the day quite like a great Starbucks Happy Hour special—both literally (the caffeine!) and figuratively (the excitement!). And today it’s hosting the HH deal of our dreams, $3 grande Frappuccinos. As a kickoff to summer, Starbs is slashing prices on all your fave Frapps (yes, all of them) starting at 3

How to Help a Friend In a Mental Health Crisis

Midway through the morning session of Mental Health First Aid, a course at the Mental Health Center of Denver, my instructor asks me to turn to one of my tablemates, look them in the eye, and ask a simple question: “Are you thinking about killing yourself?” Not “hurting yourself,” because the semantics will work against

Research reveals how the Internet may be changing the brain

An international team of researchers from Western Sydney University, Harvard University, Kings College, Oxford University and University of Manchester have found the Internet can produce both acute and sustained alterations in specific areas of cognition, which may reflect changes in the brain, affecting our attentional capacities, memory processes, and social interactions. In a first of

How chronic inflammation may drive down dopamine and motivation

Growing evidence shows that the brain’s dopamine system, which drives motivation, is directly affected by chronic, low-grade inflammation. A new paper proposes that this connection between dopamine, effort and the inflammatory response is an adaptive mechanism to help the body conserve energy. Trends in Cognitive Sciences published the theoretical framework developed by scientists at Emory

Withering away: How viral infection leads to cachexia

Many patients with chronic illnesses such as AIDS, cancer and autoimmune diseases suffer from an additional disease called cachexia. The complex, still poorly understood syndrome, with uncontrollable weight loss and shrinkage of both fat reserves and muscle tissue, is thought to contribute to premature death. Researchers at CeMM Research Center for Molecular Medicine of the

How laughing more could change your life

In the winter of 2015, I felt totally overwhelmed. In the space of exactly one week, my son suffered a concussion on a school trip, a young and close family member suddenly passed away and, after years of working in science, I was told my job was going to be made redundant. On top of