Tag: how

Withering away: How viral infection leads to cachexia

Many patients with chronic illnesses such as AIDS, cancer and autoimmune diseases suffer from an additional disease called cachexia. The complex, still poorly understood syndrome, with uncontrollable weight loss and shrinkage of both fat reserves and muscle tissue, is thought to contribute to premature death. Researchers at CeMM Research Center for Molecular Medicine of the

How laughing more could change your life

In the winter of 2015, I felt totally overwhelmed. In the space of exactly one week, my son suffered a concussion on a school trip, a young and close family member suddenly passed away and, after years of working in science, I was told my job was going to be made redundant. On top of

3-D images reveal how infants’ heads change shape during birth

Using Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), scientists have captured 3-D images that show how infants’ brains and skulls change shape as they move through the birth canal just before delivery. Olivier Ami of Auvergne University in Clermont Ferrand, France, and colleagues present these findings in the open access journal PLOS ONE on May 15, 2019. Doctors

How much protein do you need for weight loss and muscle growth?

(HealthDay)—Low-carb, vegetarian, Mediterranean—whatever your diet, it’s important to get enough protein. Although research hasn’t yet pinpointed one perfect formula, experts say that the typical “recommended” daily minimums aren’t optimal, and that it helps to factor in your weight and activity level to determine how much protein you personally need. A good baseline for people who

A comprehensive map of how Alzheimer’s affects the brain

MIT researchers have performed the first comprehensive analysis of the genes that are expressed in individual brain cells of patients with Alzheimer’s disease. The results allowed the team to identify distinctive cellular pathways that are affected in neurons and other types of brain cells. This analysis could offer many potential new drug targets for Alzheimer’s,

How to use a menstrual cup

How to use a menstrual cup Before using the menstrual cup for the first time, many choose to sterilise it. Whichever brand you go for should have guidelines on how to do this, but it tends to involve boiling it or placing it in water in the microwave. You may also need to trim the

How to deal with post-bank holiday anxiety

‘It might be social, it might be that you just love your work, it might be that you have your routine back. Connect to what it is you are looking forward to and focus on the fact that you get to do that again – turn the anxiety into excitement.’ But if you don’t love

How a woman in Arizona woke up with British accent

Rare syndrome causes woman to wake up with a foreign accent Medical Mysteries and Marvels: An American woman in Arizona goes to sleep with a headache and wakes up with a British accent. Michelle Myers is a woman from Arizona who’s never left the country. But although Myers used to speak like any other American,

How our sense of taste changes as we age

Taste is a complex phenomenon. We do not experience the sensation through a single sense (as we would when we see something using our sense of sight, for example) but rather it is made up of the five senses working together to allow us to appreciate and enjoy food and drink. Initial visual inspection of

How the brain fights off fears that return to haunt us

Neuroscientists at The University of Texas at Austin have discovered a group of cells in the brain that are responsible when a frightening memory re-emerges unexpectedly, like Michael Myers in every “Halloween” movie. The finding could lead to new recommendations about when and how often certain therapies are deployed for the treatment of anxiety, phobias

How the brain ‘mentalizes’ cooperation

What parts of your brain are involved in gauging a friend’s actions and adjusting your own; for example, when you both carry a couch up a flight of stairs? Researchers in Japan have found that part of the right side of the brain, called the temporoparietal junction, is significantly activated when two people cooperate together

Study suggests how, when to support military couples after homecoming

Military couples look forward to joyful celebrations and reunions after long deployments. Difficulties may lie ahead, though, and new research with more than 500 couples in the months after homecoming suggests how and when to help. “Military couples are incredibly resilient,” says University of Illinois communication professor Leanne Knobloch, the lead author of a first-of-its-kind

How attention helps the brain perceive an object

It’s easy to miss something you’re not looking for. In a famous example, people were asked to closely observe two groups of people—one group clad in black, the other in white—pass a ball among themselves. Viewers were asked to count the number of times the ball passed from black to white. Remarkably, most observers did