Tag: how

How attention helps the brain perceive an object

It’s easy to miss something you’re not looking for. In a famous example, people were asked to closely observe two groups of people—one group clad in black, the other in white—pass a ball among themselves. Viewers were asked to count the number of times the ball passed from black to white. Remarkably, most observers did

How to help when your child is struggling in school

(HealthDay)—Studies show that the earlier a child’s school struggles are addressed, the better the outcome will be. So it’s important for parents to tackle problems early on rather than ignore them or hope children will grow out of them. It’s often easy to spot a child who’s having difficulty with addition or subtraction, but other

How does the body respond to diffuse cutaneous leishmaniasis?

In diffuse cutaneous leishmanisis (DCL), a rare form of leishmaniasis, parasites grow uncontrolled in skin lesions across the body. For the first time, researchers reporting in PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases have now profiled how the human immune system responds to a DCL infection and, in turn, how Leishmania amazonensis adapts to the human host. American

How a common oral bacteria makes colon cancer more deadly

Researchers at the Columbia University College of Dental Medicine have determined how F. nucleatum—a common oral bacteria often implicated in tooth decay—accelerates the growth of colon cancer. The study was published online in the journal EMBO Reports. The findings could make it easier to identify and treat more aggressive colon cancers. It also helps explain

Don’t Panic: How parents can deal with internet hoaxes

The latest parental panic on social media—over a purported challenge for kids to complete harmful tasks—elevates the importance of establishing an open dialogue with children and taking advantage of online parental controls. Warnings about the “Momo challenge” swept Facebook and other social media in recent days, as parents worried about purported videos that encourage children

How to help a friend with negative body image

It’s common to feel uncomfortable with different aspects of our bodies or to want to make small changes here and there. However, sometimes this dissatisfaction with our bodies can start to become a burden. Here are some tips for helping a friend who may be struggling with negative body image and where to find support.

How to not get sick: 8 ways to avoid colds and the flu

Although most cold and flu infections occur during the fall and winter seasons, the viruses responsible for these illnesses are present year-round. Fighting off a viral infection takes its toll on most people, causing them to miss days at work and valuable time with their friends and families. In this article, we describe eight evidence-based

How Kim Kardashian Really Feels About Having 4 Kids

Kim Kardashian grew up in a large family; she’s one of Robert Kardashian and Kris Jenner’s four children, and one of nine in total counting her half-siblings. And now, Kim is forming quite the brood of her own: The reality star and Kayne West are preparing for life as a family of six. But how

How much omega-3 do people need per day?

People give omega-3 fatty acids a lot of attention due to their health benefits. Fatty fish, nuts, and seeds are rich in omega-3s. Omega-3s are important parts of the body’s cell membranes, and they help with the functioning of the heart, lungs, immune system, and hormone system. There are three types of omega-3 fatty acid:

Symmetry and strength: how to get guns like Sam Stosur’s

Nine out of 10 of us don’t do enough weight training, even though its bevvy of benefits include improved metabolism, bone density, reduced body fat, reduced blood pressure and reduced risk of diabetes. For inspiration to become stronger, we need not look further than the female athletes taking to court at the Australian Open this

How do genetic differences affect the risk of bipolar disorder?

So concluded the scientists at the Picower Institute for Learning and Memory at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) in Cambridge who carried out the novel research. In previous work, they had already shown that a protein called candidate plasticity gene 2 (CPG2) helps to regulate the strength of synapses in brain circuits. Synapses are the