Tag: how

How to Get—and Stay—Motivated to Lose Weight

If the one thing that seems to be missing from your weight loss efforts is the motivation to get started on a plan or to stick with it, you might be surprised at how much control you have when it comes to this seemingly mysterious, fired-up feeling. While motivation seems like it comes and goes

How much will we eat in the future?

The amount of food needed to feed the world’s population in the future is of vital importance. To date, scientists have only considered this question from the perspective of how much food people can afford to buy, how much food is healthy or what can be sustainably produced. However, researchers at the University of Göttingen

Using machine learning tools to reveal how memories are coded in the brain

Researchers working in The N.1 Institute for Health at NUS, led by Assistant Professor Camilo Libedinsky from NUS Psychology, and Senior Lecturer Shih-Cheng Yen from the Innovation and Design Programme at NUS Engineering, have discovered that a population of neurons in the brain’s frontal lobe contain stable short-term memory information within dynamically-changing neural activity. This

How self-reactive immune cells are allowed to develop

Directly after birth, the immune system completes production of a subtype of antibody-producing immune cells, B-1, that are to last for a lifetime. No more B1 cells are formed after that point. However, these cells are self-reactive—they produce not only antibodies against foreign substances, but also against the body’s own substances, and it is unclear

How much sleep you need, and all your bedtime questions answered

Sleep is one of those things that’s necessary for absolutely everybody, while also being pretty hard to understand to understand or find for some. Insomnia is an ever-present spectre for some, while conditions like sleep paralysis, sleep apnea, severe snoring, or night terrors pervade the lives of others. Given that sleep can affect everything from

How meaning is represented in the human brain

Representations reflecting non-linguistic experience have been detected in brain activity during reading in study of healthy, native English speakers published in JNeurosci. The research brings us one step closer to a more complete characterization of human language. Words and their relationship to one’s experience are thought to be combined in the brain to enable understanding

How animal research is helping fight antibiotic resistance

People do not expect to die from a simple infection. But that might change: the world is running out of effective antibiotics. For decades, diseases like bacterial gastroenteritis and colitis have not been a serious health threat, thanks to antibiotics. These small molecules are able to kill bacteria or stop them from reproducing and spreading