Tag: Hypertension

Preeclampsia treatment for mothers also benefits offspring: Findings could lead to therapies that lower health risks for children born to women with preeclampsia

An estimated six to 15 million people in the U.S. are children born of a pregnancy complicated by preeclampsia. New research performed in rats reveals that treating preeclampsia with sildenafil citrate (Viagra) may help protect the cardiovascular health of the offspring. Preeclampsia occurs when women with otherwise normal blood pressure experience elevated blood pressure during

High blood pressure: the blood pressure without medication

Why it’s worth it to hold out of good intentions in hypertension Eat healthier, reduce weight, exercise more and give up Smoking – this is probably the most common resolutions made for the new year. For many people it remains, however, when you Make. The implementation of these resolutions can lead to better health and

Immediate compression could help prevent complications after deep-vein thrombosis: Study supports use of this simple, low-cost intervention even for patients without symptoms

People with deep-vein thrombosis (DVT) can substantially cut their risk of potentially debilitating complications by starting adequate compression therapy in the first twenty-four hours of DVT therapy (known as the acute phase of treatment), suggests a study published today in the journal Blood. DVT occurs when a blood clot forms in a deep vein, commonly

Scientists identify hormone link between diabetes and hypertension

Physician researchers with The Ohio State University College of Medicine at the Wexner Medical Center say increased levels of the hormone aldosterone, already associated with hypertension, can play a significant role in the development of diabetes, particularly among certain racial groups. “This research is an important step toward finding new ways to prevent a major

Rise of the clones: Study identifies inherited and acquired mutations that drive precancerous blood condition

A new study led by researchers at Harvard Medical School and the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health has identified some of the first known inherited genetic variants that significantly raise a person’s likelihood of developing clonal hematopoiesis, an age-related white blood cell condition linked with higher risk of certain blood cancers and cardiovascular