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New way to prevent heart disease in type 1 diabetes

Scientists reveal the mechanism which allows a commonly prescribed drug for type 2 diabetes to prevent heart disease in patients with type 1 diabetes–and could lead to new treatments. Metformin is an inexpensive treatment that is often used for type 2 diabetes to lower blood sugar levels by reducing glucose production in the liver. The

New finding could unmask blood doping in athletes

A Duke University research team has found a way to help sporting officials detect whether an athlete’s blood has been doped by an infusion of their own stored blood. While tests have been developed to detect two of the three most common methods of dramatically boosting the oxygen-carrying capacity of a competitor’s blood, so-called “autologous”

Treatment tied to survival benefit in complex bladder cancer

(HealthDay)—Cancer treatment is associated with a clinically meaningful survival benefit in older, medically complex patients with superficial bladder cancer (SBC), according to a study published online Oct. 5 in Cancer. Tullika Garg, M.D., M.P.H., from Geisinger in Danville, Pa., and colleagues evaluated the association between treatment of SBC and 10-year mortality in 1,800 medically complex

Psychopaths in business: Why sex matters

According to some media outlets, individuals who are successful in corporations are highly likely to have psychopathic traits. Specifically, they are thought to assert dominance over others, act impulsively, and lack empathy. In reality, studies that have looked into the relationship between psychopathy and success have reached less firm conclusions. There is no consensus of

2006 to 2015 saw decrease in Medicare beneficiary ICU use

(HealthDay)—From 2006 to 2015, there was a significant decrease in intensive care unit (ICU) admissions among Medicare fee-for-service beneficiaries, according to a research letter published online Oct. 15 in the Annals of Internal Medicine. Gary E. Weissman, M.D., from the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia, and colleagues used data from the Medicare Provider Analysis and

In NSCLC, Longer Survival With Brigatinib Than Crizotinib

MONDAY, Oct. 15, 2018 — Among patients with anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK)-positive non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) who have not previously received an ALK inhibitor, progression-free survival is significantly longer in those who receive treatment with brigatinib versus crizotinib, according to a study published online Sept. 25 in the New England Journal of Medicine. D.

New way to determine whether metastatic cancer cells in breast cancer patients are dormant or soon to turn deadly

For the first time ever, Mount Sinai researchers have identified a protein as a marker that can indicate whether a cancer patient will develop a reoccurrence of lethal, metastatic cancer, according to a clinical study published in Breast Cancer Research in October. The researchers found that when cells from a breast cancer patient’s original tumor

Two seemingly opposing forces in the brain actually cooperate to enhance memory formation

The brain allows organisms to learn and adapt to their surroundings. It does this by literally changing the connections, or synapses, between neurons, strengthening meaningful patterns of neural activity in order to store information. The existence of this process—brain plasticity—has been known for some time. But actually, there are two different types of brain plasticity

Renal-replacement timing has no effect in kidney injury, sepsis

(HealthDay)—For patients with early-stage septic shock and severe acute kidney injury, 90-day mortality does not differ for patients randomly assigned to an early strategy for initiation of renal-replacement therapy versus a delayed strategy, according to a study published in the Oct. 11 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine. Saber D. Barbar, M.D., Ph.D.,

Neuron death in ALS more complex than previously thought

Brown University researchers have uncovered new clues about the progression of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS), a surprisingly common disease that causes the death of motor neurons that control voluntary muscles such as those involved in walking, talking, chewing or breathing. A team led by Anne Hart, a professor of neuroscience at Brown, discovered that two