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Researchers explore new way of killing malaria in the liver

In the ongoing hunt for more effective weapons against malaria, international researchers said Thursday they are exploring a pathway that has until now been little studied—killing parasites in the liver, before the illness emerges. “It’s very difficult to work on the liver stage,” said Elizabeth Winzeler, professor of pharmacology and drug discovery at University of

Type 2 Diabetes Linked to Colorectal Cancer Risk in Men

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 5, 2018 — Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is associated with an increased risk for colorectal cancer (CRC), with the association significant for men only, according to a study published online Nov. 7 in the British Journal of Cancer. Yanan Ma, from China Medical University in Shenyang, and colleagues followed 87,523 women from the

Prolonged Brain Connections Seen in Adults With Autism

THURSDAY, Nov. 29, 2018 — Connections between different areas of the brain are sustained longer than usual in people with autism, perhaps explaining some of their symptoms, a new study suggests. It’s possible these prolonged connections make it difficult for the brain to switch from one activity to another, the researchers said. “People with autism

Traversing the interfaces in medical research

The continually rising health care costs in Germany require cost intelligent innovations at the intersecting frontiers of scientific disciplines. Prof. Gerd Geisslinger is Medical Research Officer for the Fraunhofer-Gesellschaft. In this interview he explains why the Fraunhofer-Gesellschaft is in a unique position to tackle challenges in medical research and to pull together the four major

Can Superman trigger heroic helping in people?

Might people be more likely to help a stranger or donate money immediately after watching the latest Marvel film? Heroes demonstrate extraordinary courage, go to great lengths to help others, and live meaningful lives. They are inspirational moral examples for many people—but do their heroic actions trigger people to give a helping hand themselves? A

Music may improve mood in adults with dementia

In a Geriatrics & Gerontology International study of 51 individuals living with dementia who attended community-based adult day health centers, behavioral observations of a music intervention showed a positive change in mood and a decrease in agitation. Participants demonstrated significant increases in joy, eye contact, eye movement, being engaged, and talkativeness, and a decrease in

Breakthrough in treatment of Restless Legs Syndrome

New research published in the Journal of Physiology presents a breakthrough in the treatment of Restless Legs Syndrome (RLS). RLS is a common condition of the nervous system that causes an overwhelming irresistible urge to move the legs. Patients complain of unpleasant symptoms such as tingling, burning and painful cramping sensations in the leg. More

Cardiogenic shock ups mortality in takotsubo syndrome

(HealthDay)—For patients with takotsubo syndrome (TTS), those with cardiogenic shock (CS) have an increased risk for mortality, according to a research letter published online Nov. 10 in Circulation to coincide with the annual meeting of the American Heart Association, held from Nov. 10 to 12 in Chicago. Davide Di Vece, M.D., from the University Hospital

Synthetic DNA-delivered antibodies protect against Ebola in preclinical studies

Scientists at The Wistar Institute and collaborators have successfully engineered novel DNA-encoded monoclonal antibodies (DMAbs) targeting Zaire Ebolavirus that were effective in preclinical models. Study results, published online in Cell Reports, showed that DMAbs were expressed over a wide window of time and offered complete and long-term protection against lethal virus challenges. DMAbs may also

More women in poor countries use contraception, says report

A new report says more women in the poorest countries are using modern contraception, signifying progress in efforts to involve women in family planning. But the report, launched Monday by the U.N.-backed advocacy group FP2020, says many others who want to delay or prevent pregnancy are unable to access contraception, often due to lack of

Brain signature of depressed mood unveiled in new study

Most of us have had moments when we’re feeling down—maybe we can’t stop thinking about our worst mistakes, or our most embarrassing memories—but for some, these poor mood states can be relentless and even debilitating. Now, new research from UC San Francisco has identified a common pattern of brain activity that may be behind those

Link between autoimmune, heart disease explained in mice

People with autoimmune diseases such as psoriasis, lupus and rheumatoid arthritis are at high risk of developing cardiovascular disease, even though none of these conditions seem to target the cardiovascular system directly. Now, researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis believe they have begun to understand the link between the two. Researchers

Female Genital Mutilation Decreasing in African Nations

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 7, 2018 — Female genital mutilation/cutting has declined sharply in most of Africa, but the practice is still widespread in western Asia, a new study finds. Researchers analyzed data collected in 29 countries in Africa, as well as in western Asia (Iraq and Yemen) between 1990 and 2017. The greatest declines among girls

From asexuality to heteroflexibility: 21st century ushers in new openness about intimate relationships

The 21st century has ushered in a “quiet revolution” in the diversity of intimate relationships, and a leading scholar says the scale and pace of this social transformation warrants a “reboot” of relationship studies. Social media and the internet have empowered individuals with diverse identities and relationship practices to find each other, raising awareness of