Tag: Key

Genes, Not Diet, May Be Key to Gout Flare-Ups

THURSDAY, Oct. 11, 2018 — Although many people suffering from painful gout flare-ups point to diet as the culprit, new research suggests DNA plays a much bigger role. The findings challenge the long-held belief that diet is the major factor in gout, a joint disease that causes extreme pain and swelling. Gout is caused by

Skin Appears to Be Key Pathway for Absorption of BBQ Fumes

FRIDAY, Aug. 3, 2018 — Dermal absorption is a more important pathway than inhalation for the intake of low-molecular-weight polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) during barbecuing, according to a study published recently in Environmental Science & Technology. Jia-Yong Lao, from Jinan University in Guangzhou, China, and colleagues collected and analyzed urine samples for nine hydroxyl (OH)-PAHs

Linguistic expertise key to improving Deaf health research

For the past two years, Tim Riker, a lecturer of American Sign Language at Brown University’s Center for Language Studies, has worked with a group of University of Massachusetts Medical School researchers to tackle a significant problem: low levels of health literacy within the Deaf community, due in part to the disconnect between biomedical researchers

Supportive Managers Key When a Worker Is Depressed

TUESDAY, July 24, 2018 — Employees struggling with depression take less time off from work if they receive support and help from their managers, a new study suggests. Many people suffer depression at some point during their working lives. But they often don’t disclose their condition or seek help because they’re afraid of repercussions, according

Control of the iRhom2 protein may hold the key to preventing Alzheimer’s disease

It is known that the onset of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is associated with the accumulation of Amyloid beta (Aβ) peptides in small molecular clusters known as oligomers. These trigger the formation of so-called ‘neurofibrillary tangles’ within neurons hamper their workings, ultimately causing cell death and so significant cognitive decline. Very large Aβ oligomers which form

Better implants key to repair damaged knees

People whose knees have been affected by osteoarthritis, also known as the ‘wear and tear’ arthritis, often have to get knee implants to repair the damage. But if a knee implant does not fit the specific individual, it can lead to soft tissue damage, collapsing of the underlying bone, loosening of the implant and an

Often overlooked glial cell is key to learning and memory

Glial cells surround neurons and provide support—not unlike hospital staff and nurses supporting doctors to keep operations running smoothly. These often-overlooked cells, which include oligodendrocytes and astrocytes, are the most abundant cell types in the central nervous system. But these cells do more than support neurons. They also actively influence them, University of California, Riverside,

Balanced diet may be key to cancer survival

(HealthDay)—Eating a nutritionally balanced high-quality diet may lower a cancer patient’s risk of dying by as much as 65 percent, new research suggests. The finding that total diet, rather than specific nutritional components, can affect a cancer patient’s prognosis “was particularly surprising to us,” said the study’s lead author, Ashish Deshmukh. Total diet, he explained,

Key cancer-fighting gene’s secret weapons revealed

The findings revealed that a special group of genes that function within the body’s normal DNA repair process were vital to the effectiveness of p53. This new information could help doctors to better identify patients with an increased risk of developing certain cancers. It could also help to develop safer, more effective treatments for patients.

Cellular recycling process is key to longer, healthier life

Building on two decades of research, investigators at UT Southwestern have determined that “cellular housekeeping” can extend the lifespan and healthspan of mammals. A study jointly led by Drs. Salwa Sebti and Álvaro Fernández, postdoctoral researchers in the Center for Autophagy Research, found that mice with persistently increased levels of autophagy—the process a cell uses

Microglia are key defenders against prion diseases

Prion diseases are slow degenerative brain diseases that occur in people and various other mammals. No vaccines or treatments are available, and these diseases are almost always fatal. Scientists have found little evidence of a protective immune response to prion infections. Further, microglia—brain cells usually involved in the first level of host defense against infections

Researchers make key discovery about human cancer virus protein

University of Minnesota researchers in the dentistry school-based Institute for Molecular Virology (IMV) have made a key discovery that could have important implications for developing a strategy to stop the spread of a highly infectious virus currently spreading among remote areas of central Australia. Called human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1), infection rates are

Understanding fear of guilt key in better treating OCD

Advances in our understanding of the development and persistence of Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD) have the potential to improve treatment according to a new study by the University of Waterloo. The study found that fear of guilt evokes feelings of doubt in decision-making, with greater fear of guilt being associated with greater self-reported difficulty making decisions,