Tag: lung

Most patients with cystic fibrosis may receive insufficient antibiotics to fight lung infections

The majority of patients with cystic fibrosis may not achieve blood concentrations of antibiotics sufficiently high enough to effectively fight bacteria responsible for pulmonary exacerbations, leading to worsening pulmonary function, indicates a study led by researchers at Children’s National Health System. Additionally, the study findings show that it’s impossible to predict solely from dosing regimens

Childhood risk profiles affect middle-age lung function

(HealthDay)—Profiles of childhood respiratory risk factors predict middle-age lung function levels and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) risk, according to a study published in the September issue of the Annals of the American Thoracic Society. Dinh S. Bui, from the University of Melbourne in Australia, and colleagues assessed 11 childhood risk factor profiles (documented at

Lung inflammation from childhood asthma linked with later anxiety

Persistent lung inflammation may be one possible explanation for why having asthma during childhood increases your risk for developing anxiety later in life, according to Penn State researchers. In a study with mice, researchers found that childhood exposure to allergens was linked with persistent lung inflammation. It was also connected to changes in gene expression

Poor Shared Decision-Making for Lung Cancer Screening

TUESDAY, Aug. 28, 2018 — The quality of shared decision-making (SDM) about the initiation of lung cancer screening (LCS) is poor, according to a study published online Aug. 13 in JAMA Internal Medicine. Alison T. Brenner, Ph.D., M.P.H., from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and colleagues conducted a qualitative content analysis of

Study shows biomarker panel boosts lung cancer risk assessment for smokers

A four-protein biomarker blood test improves lung cancer risk assessment over existing guidelines that rely solely upon smoking history, capturing risk for people who have ever smoked, not only for heavy smokers, an international research team reports in JAMA Oncology. “This simple blood test demonstrates the potential of biomarker-based risk assessment to improve eligibility criteria

Oxygen therapy could help combat dementia in individuals with lung disease

Breathing in additional oxygen improves the function of blood vessels in the brain of people with breathing difficulties caused by lung conditions, according to new research published in Experimental Physiology. These findings could have implications for future research aiming to prevent the development of diseases affecting the brain, such as dementia. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

Low vitamin D levels associated with scarring lung disease

Reviewing medical information gathered on more than 6,000 adults over a 10-year period, Johns Hopkins researchers have found that lower than normal blood levels of vitamin D were linked to increased risk of early signs of interstitial lung disease (ILD). Interstitial lung disease is a relatively rare group of disorders characterized by lung scarring and

Blood test shows potential for early detection of lung cancer

A test that analyzes free-floating DNA in the blood may be able to detect early-stage lung cancer, a preliminary report from the ongoing Circulating Cell-Free Genome Atlas (CCGA) study suggests. The findings, from one of the first studies to explore whether sequencing blood-borne DNA is a feasible approach to the early cancer detection, will be

Researchers identify spike in severe black lung disease among former US coal miners

The number of cases of progressive massive fibrosis, the most severe form of black lung disease, has been increasing dramatically among coal workers and especially younger workers in central Appalachia. These new findings represent the first-ever documentation of this spike and were presented by Kirsten Almberg, research assistant professor of environmental and occupational health sciences

Study finds a weak handshake may predict an early death

What does YOUR handshake reveal? Study finds a weaker grip is linked to an early death from cancer, lung disease, or a heart attack Scientists measured the grip strength of half a million people over three years They compared their grip with their health outcomes over time The weaker the grip, they found, the higher

Clues found to early lung transplant failure

Among organ transplant patients, those receiving new lungs face a higher rate of organ failure and death compared with people undergoing heart, kidney and liver transplants. One of the culprits is inflammation that damages the newly transplanted lung. Now, researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis and Northwestern University Feinberg School of