Tag: may

Genes, Not Diet, May Be Key to Gout Flare-Ups

THURSDAY, Oct. 11, 2018 — Although many people suffering from painful gout flare-ups point to diet as the culprit, new research suggests DNA plays a much bigger role. The findings challenge the long-held belief that diet is the major factor in gout, a joint disease that causes extreme pain and swelling. Gout is caused by

Air pollution may be linked to heightened mouth cancer risk

High levels of air pollutants, especially fine particulate matter (PM2.5) and to a lesser extent, ozone, may be linked to a heightened risk of developing mouth cancer, suggests the first study of its kind, published online in the Journal of Investigative Medicine. The number of new cases, and deaths from, mouth cancer is increasing in

Alternative medicines may aid in the treatment of psoriasis

(HealthDay)—Some complementary and alternative medicines (CAMs) may be helpful in the treatment of psoriasis, according to a review published online Sept. 5 in JAMA Dermatology. A. Caresse Gamret, from the University of Miami, and colleagues conducted a systematic literature review to identify studies evaluating all documented CAM psoriasis interventions. Included interventions had more than one

Ovarian cancer: Newer birth control pills may lower risk

In the United States, ovarian cancer has the highest mortality rate of all gynecologic cancers, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). In 2014, for instance, over 21,000 new cases of ovarian cancer occurred, at least 14,000 of which resulted in death. Previous research has suggested that combined oral contraceptives — that

Olfactory cells may act as ‘Trojan horse,’ carry anticancer therapy to deadly brain tumors

A special type of cell essential to the ability of olfactory neurons to regenerate may be genetically engineered to deliver anticancer therapy to the dangerous brain tumors called glioblastomas. In their report published in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute, Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) researchers describe using olfactory ensheathing cells to deliver an anticancer

Ovary removal may increase risk of chronic kidney disease

Premenopausal women who have their ovaries surgically removed face an increased risk of developing chronic kidney disease, according to a Mayo Clinic study published on Wednesday, Sept. 19, in the Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology. “This is the first study that has shown an important link between estrogen deprivation in younger women

Caffeine consumption may extend life expectancy for people with kidney disease

A new study in Nephrology Dialysis Transplantation indicates that consuming more caffeine may help reduce the risk of death for people with chronic kidney disease. An inverse relationship between coffee consumption and mortality has been reported in the general population. However, the association between caffeine consumption and mortality for people with chronic kidney disease remains

Widely used youth behaviour treatment may be ineffective: study

A long-established treatment used around the world to help troubled young people and their families tackle behavioural problems may not be as effective as its practitioners claim—a new study reveals. Functional Family Therapy (FFT) is a short-term, evidence-based intervention provided at over 270 sites worldwide—mostly within the US, but also in Belgium, Ireland, The Netherlands,

Chronic pain may be an important contributor to suicide

Chronic pain may be an important contributor to suicide. Nearly 9 percent of people who died by suicide in 18 states from 2003 to 2014 had documentation of chronic pain in their incident records. Findings from the National Violent Death Reporting System (NVDRS) are published in Annals of Internal Medicine. More than 25 million adults

Low fitness may indicate poor arterial health in adolescents

A recent Finnish study conducted at the University of Jyväskylä showed that adolescents with better aerobic fitness have more compliant arteries than their lower fit peers do. The study also suggests that a higher anaerobic threshold is linked to better arterial health. The results were published in the European Journal of Applied Physiology. Arterial stiffness

Obamacare May Have Boosted Access to Birth Control

FRIDAY, Aug. 31, 2018 — Medicaid expansion through the Affordable Care Act, also called Obamacare, may close a big gap in women’s access to reproductive health care, a new study suggests. In a survey of nearly 1,200 women of childbearing age enrolled in Michigan’s expansion of Medicaid for low-income adults, one in three said the

An allergy to red meat may be tied to heart disease

(HealthDay)—An allergen in red meat may be tied to heart disease, according to a study published in the July issue of Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis, and Vascular Biology. Jeffrey M. Wilson, M.D., Ph.D., from the University of Virginia in Charlottesville, and colleagues analyzed blood samples for total immunoglobulin E (IgE) and specific IgE to galactose-α-1,3-galactose (α-Gal) among