Tag: may

Social media photo overkill may boost narcissism

The findings, which appear in The Open Psychology Journal, show that participants who posted large numbers of photos and selfies on social media developed a 25 percent rise in narcissistic traits over the 4-month study period. This uptick in traits pushed some participants past the diagnostic cutoff for narcissistic personality disorder. Social media allows us

For Some Women, Mammograms May Need to Begin at 30: Study

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 28, 2018 — Women at increased risk for breast cancer should start receiving mammograms earlier than recommended, even as young as age 30, a new study contends. Young women who have dense breasts or a family history of breast cancer appear to benefit from regular mammograms as much as women in their 40s

Music may improve mood in adults with dementia

In a Geriatrics & Gerontology International study of 51 individuals living with dementia who attended community-based adult day health centers, behavioral observations of a music intervention showed a positive change in mood and a decrease in agitation. Participants demonstrated significant increases in joy, eye contact, eye movement, being engaged, and talkativeness, and a decrease in

Most patients with cystic fibrosis may receive insufficient antibiotics to fight lung infections

The majority of patients with cystic fibrosis may not achieve blood concentrations of antibiotics sufficiently high enough to effectively fight bacteria responsible for pulmonary exacerbations, leading to worsening pulmonary function, indicates a study led by researchers at Children’s National Health System. Additionally, the study findings show that it’s impossible to predict solely from dosing regimens

Black infants may have higher cardiac arrest rates

A multi-year review of all pediatric emergency response records in Houston found that Black infants comprised a significantly larger proportion of cardiac arrests than expected, more than four times more cases than in non-Hispanic White children, according to preliminary research to be presented in Chicago at the American Heart Association’s Resuscitation Science Symposium 2018, an

Why healthcare data may be more secure with cloud computing

In the last few years, cloud computing has moved from an option for healthcare providers to, increasingly, a business necessity. By outsourcing data management to a cloud services company, hospitals can free up their own technical staff to do more work closer to their core competencies. “Microsoft coming along with a public cloud infrastructure, once

Healthy aging: Gut bacteria may prevent disease

In the ancient myth of Tithonus, the eponymous protagonist asks the gods to live forever but forgets to demand eternal youth. Although he gained immortality, the diseases of old age eventually defeat Tithonus, and he bitterly regrets his immortality. While achieving longevity is a goal worth pursuing and an ambition that humankind has harbored since

Heart attack: New finding may change the face of treatment

Antibodies, or immunoglobulins (Ig), are a type of protein produced by plasma cells (a kind of blood cell). The immune system often co-opts these to fight potentially harmful foreign bodies. Now, researchers from the Karolinska Institutet in Solna, Sweden, have discovered that certain antibodies — once associated with rheumatic diseases — are also present in

Young children with heart disease and their families may have poorer quality of life than the general population

A study by medical researchers from UNSW Sydney and the Sydney Children’s Hospitals Network has shown that young children with heart disease and their families may have poorer quality of life than the general population, leading to calls for routine screening to enable early intervention and better outcomes. The paper – the largest Australian study

Test Strips for Fentanyl May Help Prevent ODs

THURSDAY, Oct. 18, 2018 — Fast-acting test strips for fentanyl could reduce drug overdose deaths, a new study suggests. “Test strips could be a lifesaving intervention for many young adults who use drugs,” said study leader Brandon Marshall, of Brown University in Rhode Island. Fentanyl is a powerful synthetic opioid often used to lace other

Environmental factors may trigger onset of multiple sclerosis

A new Tel Aviv University study finds that certain environmental conditions may precipitate structural changes that take place in myelin sheaths in the onset of multiple sclerosis (MS). Myelin sheaths are the “insulating tape” surrounding axons; axons carry electrical impulses in neurons. The research demonstrates that myelin sheaths undergo structural transitions when triggered by changes

Genes, Not Diet, May Be Key to Gout Flare-Ups

THURSDAY, Oct. 11, 2018 — Although many people suffering from painful gout flare-ups point to diet as the culprit, new research suggests DNA plays a much bigger role. The findings challenge the long-held belief that diet is the major factor in gout, a joint disease that causes extreme pain and swelling. Gout is caused by