Tag: may

Blood pressure outside of clinic may better predict outcomes in black patients

(HealthDay)—Among African-Americans, higher daytime and nighttime systolic blood pressure (SBP) is associated with an increased risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD) events and all-cause mortality independent of blood pressure (BP) levels measured in the clinic, according to a study published online Aug. 14 in JAMA Cardiology. Yuichiro Yano, M.D., Ph.D., from Duke University in Durham, North

Preeclampsia risk may be reduced by a healthy high-fibre diet

A healthy diet rich in fibre is generally recommended, but new research shows it could be even more important during pregnancy to promote the wellbeing of the mother and child. Plant-based fibre is broken down in the gut by bacteria into factors that influence the immune system. Researchers from the University of Sydney’s Charles Perkins

Pressure difference and vortex flow of blood in heart chambers may signal heart dysfunction

Japanese scientists at Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology (TUAT), Teikyo University of Science, and Juntendo University have found—in animal studies—a close relationship between vortex flow and pressure differences in the ventricles, or lower chambers, of the heart. The new information could inform the development of new markers for cardiovascular dysfunction that can lead to

Hospitals may divert ambulances to avoid treating certain patients

Some hospitals may strategically divert ambulances to avoid treating low‐paying patients who are uninsured or who have Medicaid, according to a recent analysis. Charleen Hsuan, assistant professor of health policy and administration at Penn State, led a study that examined whether hospitals are more likely to temporarily close their emergency departments to ambulances—a process known

Research reveals how the Internet may be changing the brain

An international team of researchers from Western Sydney University, Harvard University, Kings College, Oxford University and University of Manchester have found the Internet can produce both acute and sustained alterations in specific areas of cognition, which may reflect changes in the brain, affecting our attentional capacities, memory processes, and social interactions. In a first of

How chronic inflammation may drive down dopamine and motivation

Growing evidence shows that the brain’s dopamine system, which drives motivation, is directly affected by chronic, low-grade inflammation. A new paper proposes that this connection between dopamine, effort and the inflammatory response is an adaptive mechanism to help the body conserve energy. Trends in Cognitive Sciences published the theoretical framework developed by scientists at Emory

Arsenic in drinking water may change heart structure

Drinking water that is contaminated with arsenic may lead to thickening of the heart’s main pumping chamber in young adults, a structural change that increases the risk for future heart problems, according to new research in Circulation: Cardiovascular Imaging, an American Heart Association journal. “People drinking water from private wells, which are not regulated, need