Tag: may

Scientists discover signs a virus may trigger polio-like illness

Is THIS what causes mysterious polio-like illness in kids? Scientists discover signs that a common cold virus may trigger life-threatening paralysis in children Since 2014, nearly 600 people – mostly young children – have been diagnosed with acute flaccid myelitis   The mysterious polio-like condition has left young children with mysterious paralysis that becomes life-threatening for some

Exam stress may not be fun, but it can help you get better grades

Two-thirds of young people experience levels of exam stress that mental health organization ReachOut describes as “worrying.” Research shows high levels of exam stress can interfere with attention and reduce working memory, leading to lower performance. Early experiences of anxiety and stress can also set a precedent for mental-health problems in adulthood. But how we

Women's miscarriage risks may double if partners smoke weed often

Women’s miscarriage risks DOUBLE when their partners smoke weed more than once a week, study suggests About 37 million Americans use marijuana, including a growing number of pregnant women – despite doctors’ warnings not to  Research on the fertility and fetal health effects of pot has yielded mix results   Boston University researchers found that when

New study may have the reason why heart medication gives muscle pain

A study from McMaster University has found a potential mechanism explaining why some people who take drugs to lower their cholesterol develop sore, aching muscles. The use of statin drugs to significantly lower cholesterol, and ultimately reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease, has become widespread and large-scale studies suggest that nearly half of Americans and

Survey suggests elderly patients with diabetes may favor more aggressive blood sugar control

Survey results of a national sample of elderly people with type 2 diabetes suggest that many long-time patients downplay medical and social factors that underpin professional recommendations for fewer medications and less aggressive treatment of high blood sugar. The survey study, conducted by Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers, concludes that many older adults with diabetes, when

Anemia may contribute to the spread of dengue fever

Mosquitoes are more likely to acquire the dengue virus when they feed on blood with low levels of iron, researchers report in the 16 September issue of Nature Microbiology. Supplementing people’s diets with iron in places where both iron deficiency anemia and dengue fever are a problem could potentially limit transmission of the disease, but

Introvert? You may just be bad at recognizing faces

Although most of us can distinguish between and remember hundreds of different faces, some people are better at it than others. “Super-recognizers” can accurately identify faces even when they have only seen them briefly previously. At the other extreme, “developmental prosopagnosics” are significantly impaired at recognizing faces in many everyday situations. For the majority of

Artificial intelligence approaches may improve diagnostics of kidney disease

Two new studies reveal that modern machine learning—a branch of artificial intelligence in which systems learn from data, identify patterns, and make decisions—may augment traditional diagnostics of kidney disease. The findings appear in an upcoming issue of JASN. Pathologists often classify various kidney diseases on the basis of visual assessments of biopsies from patients’ kidneys;

The One Thing That May Actually Change Anti-Vaxxers' Minds

While anti-vaxxers are a relatively small portion of the population, they are growing. Since 2001, the number of unvaccinated kids has quadrupled, which puts not only those children at risk but also anyone around them who is too young or too immunocompromised to receive vaccines themselves. The anti-vax movement is also growing more vocal both

Blood pressure outside of clinic may better predict outcomes in black patients

(HealthDay)—Among African-Americans, higher daytime and nighttime systolic blood pressure (SBP) is associated with an increased risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD) events and all-cause mortality independent of blood pressure (BP) levels measured in the clinic, according to a study published online Aug. 14 in JAMA Cardiology. Yuichiro Yano, M.D., Ph.D., from Duke University in Durham, North