Tag: more

More women in poor countries use contraception, says report

A new report says more women in the poorest countries are using modern contraception, signifying progress in efforts to involve women in family planning. But the report, launched Monday by the U.N.-backed advocacy group FP2020, says many others who want to delay or prevent pregnancy are unable to access contraception, often due to lack of

Updated cholesterol guidelines offer more personalized risk assessment, additional treatment options

More personalized risk assessments and new cholesterol-lowering drug options for people at the highest risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD) are among the key recommendations in the 2018 cholesterol guidelines from the American Heart Association (AHA) and the American College of Cardiology (ACC). The guidelines were presented today at the Association’s 2018 Scientific Sessions conference in

More Americans Are Raising Their Grandkids

MONDAY, Nov. 5, 2018 — More than 3 million older Americans are now raising their grandchildren as their own, even as they struggle with health problems and financial stresses, a new survey shows. Not only that, the children they take in are more likely to be troubled as they struggle to adjust to new lives,

More Australians affected by gambling and for longer

On the eve of the Melbourne Cup, new research from The Australian National University (ANU) has found more Australians are experiencing gambling harm and suffering life and health hardships for much longer than previously known. In providing one of the first national snapshots of gambling harm in Australia, the Centre for Gambling Research (CGR) has

Guns End More Lives by Suicide Than Murder

FRIDAY, Nov. 2, 2018 — Shootings make the headlines, yet the American public doesn’t know that guns take more lives by suicide than by homicide, a new study reveals. In the United States, suicide is twice as common as murder, and suicide by firearm is more common than homicide by firearm, the researchers reported. However,

Road to cell death more clearly identified for Parkinson’s disease

In experiments performed in mice, Johns Hopkins researchers report they have identified the cascade of cell death events leading to the physical and intellectual degeneration associated with Parkinson’s disease. Results of the study, published Nov. 2 in Science, suggest promising new targets for drugs that could interrupt Parkinson’s disease progression. The study, the researchers say,

Why healthcare data may be more secure with cloud computing

In the last few years, cloud computing has moved from an option for healthcare providers to, increasingly, a business necessity. By outsourcing data management to a cloud services company, hospitals can free up their own technical staff to do more work closer to their core competencies. “Microsoft coming along with a public cloud infrastructure, once

Unrestricted diet OK more than one day before colonoscopy

(HealthDay)—Unrestricted diets are acceptable more than one day before colonoscopy among patients using a split-dose bowel regimen, according to a study published in the October issue of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy. Anna M. Leszczynski, M.D., from the Boston University Medical Center, and colleagues investigated whether fiber and various other foods/macronutrients consumed during the three days before colonoscopy

The SEVEN signs you’re not eating enough protein

From thinning hair to flabby muscles and brain fog: The SEVEN signs you’re not eating enough protein (and simple tips for how to get more) Government says protein consumption should be 0.8g per kilo of body weight Despite this, countless people regularly fail to eat anywhere near this amount Here, nutritionists Rick Hay and May

COPD and age: Onset, life expectancy, and more

COPD is a collection of chronic lung disorders that usually develop after years of lung damage. Age does appear to be a factor with COPD because of this, and older people may be more at risk than those who are younger. Diagnosing COPD early is critical because treatment focuses on slowing the progression of the

Preeclampsia: We can do more

Each year, more than 10,000 pregnant women in Australia suffer from preeclampsia and 30,000 die from it on a global level. The condition, characterized by high blood pressure, can be fatal and have long-term health effects for both mothers and babies. It causes the death of 780 babies each day. These numbers, according to Dean

E-cigarettes should be used more actively to help smokers quit, experts recommend

“Ongoing nervousness” about the use of e-cigarettes in stop-smoking services can be a “significant” barrier to people finding support, research revealed during “Stoptober” shows. New research by the University of Exeter and University of Melbourne, funded by Cancer Research UK, suggests stop smoking services which are e-cigarette friendly should advertise this more openly, and says

Neuron death in ALS more complex than previously thought

Brown University researchers have uncovered new clues about the progression of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS), a surprisingly common disease that causes the death of motor neurons that control voluntary muscles such as those involved in walking, talking, chewing or breathing. A team led by Anne Hart, a professor of neuroscience at Brown, discovered that two

Polish lawmakers approve more talks on banning vaccinations

Lawmakers from Poland’s conservative ruling party have approved further parliamentary discussion over a controversial plan to abolish compulsory vaccinations for children, including those against serious diseases such as polio, measles, tuberculosis, rubella and whooping cough. A civic group that proposed the plan argues that the vaccinations can be hazardous to small children and insists that