Tag: new

Stoners Weigh Less Than Everyone Else, Says New Study

Stoners are known for eating frozen pizza rolls and other questionable snacks when they get high. Naturally, you’d think all those empty calories could cause weight problems, but a new study says that isn’t the case. People who regularly smoke weed are less likely to be overweight or obese compared to those who abstain, according

The Best New Snacks to Buy at Aldi Right Now

Aldi has quickly become one of our go-to spots for stocking up on snacks, now that the European chain is rapidly expanding into the US (by 2022 they’ll have almost 2,500 stores here in the US). When you’re at Aldi, you can expect to find great deals on bulk items, specialty foods, and both American

'New wave of change' coming to healthcare

Women In Health ITResource Center Stay Informed Susbscribe today to receive our FREE monthly e-newsletter Have valuable and interesting information to share? contribute today! Featured Contributors Laura Lovett is an associate editor at MobiHealthNews where she covers the intersection of healthcare and technology. She is also a contributing editor to Women in Healthcare IT at

New York City's mandatory measles vaccine orders trigger lawsuit from parents

Is the anti-vaccination movement to blame for the near-record number of measles cases? NEW YORK CITY – Five parents filed a lawsuit Monday against the New York City Department of Health claiming the city overstepped its authority by making vaccinations mandatory in neighborhoods experiencing the measles outbreak. The parents claimed last week’s orders violated their “children’s

New tools and strategies for tuberculosis diagnosis, care, and elimination: A PLOS Medicine special

This week, publication of a special issue on tuberculosis (TB) begins in PLOS Medicine, advised by guest editors Richard Chaisson of Johns Hopkins University, Claudia Denkinger of the University of Heidelberg, and Mark Hatherill of the South African Tuberculosis Vaccine Institute. An estimated 10 million people developed tuberculosis (TB) and 1.6 million died of TB

New insights into the development and therapy of cancer

Oncologists at the University and University Hospital in Tübingen have discovered a new protein variant that plays an important role in the development and therapy response of cancer. For physicians, this discovery opens up the opportunity for new options in the diagnosis and therapy of cancer. The results of the study were published on Tuesday,

New thermal ablation method for adenoma shows promise

Researchers from the USA (Kansas State University) and the Republic of Ireland (the National University of Ireland Galway) have completed a successful initial test of a new microwave thermal ablation technique, which could eventually be used to treat Conn’s syndrome. Conn’s syndrome occurs when a benign adrenal gland adenoma causes the production of excess aldosterone,

Drug-resistant tuberculosis: A new study offers new hope

Tuberculosis (TB) is the leading cause of death in the world from a single infectious disease, causing more deaths than HIV/AIDS. In 2017, 10 million people developed TB disease globally and an estimated 1.6 million died. One of the biggest blocks to beating the epidemic is the growing resistance to drugs that have previously cured

The Best New Cookbooks We're Reading Right Now

Yes, we spend most of our days looking at recipes online and drooling over food photos on Instagram. But we still have a big soft spot for classic IRL cookbooks. They line our bookshelves, are piled on our kitchen counter and, if we’re being honest, litter our desks. A good cookbook is about more than

New drug could help those with tough-to-treat cholesterol

People whose high cholesterol is resistant to treatment with statin drugs may soon have a new treatment option. This new class of drugs helps block synthesis of artery-clogging cholesterol, researchers explained. The drugs target an enzyme called ATP citrate lyase (ACL), part of the production pathway for “bad” LDL cholesterol in the body. In the

New evidence proves the work of UN agencies is effective

Academics led by Professor Lucie Cluver at Oxford University have shown how key services in lower and middle-income countries can contribute to multiple sustainable development goals (SDGs), even for the highest-risk children and adolescents. The study, led by Oxford University in collaboration with the universities of Cape Town and Witwatersrand, University College London and the

Novel treatments offer new hope for patients with autoimmune disease

Autoimmune diseases, including type 1 diabetes and multiple sclerosis, arise when the body’s immune cells attack itself. Current treatments eliminate these misfunctioning immune cells, but also destroy normal, protective immune cells, leaving patients susceptible to immune deficiency and opportunistic infections. Researchers at University of Utah Health have developed a new approach that targets the misfunctioning

Small Trial Provides New Hope Against Parkinson’s Disease

FRIDAY, March 1, 2019 — It may be possible to restore brain cells damaged by Parkinson’s disease and reverse a patient’s condition, something no current treatment can do, according to British researchers who conducted potentially groundbreaking clinical trials. They cautioned the trial was small — just 41 patients — and the research is still in

With new heart, mom of four competes in transplant games

Kristen Patton was settling in to feed her newborn on Christmas Eve as her three older children went to bed. It was the holiday evening she had envisioned—relaxed family time the day after coming home from the hospital following the birth of her daughter, Hattie. Suddenly, unbelievable pain shot through Kristen’s left jaw. It moved

New study shows Transcendental Meditation reduces PTSD in South African college students

A very high percentage of young people in South Africa suffer from post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and depression. A college that offers the Transcendental Meditation (TM) technique to its students found this approach helped reduce their symptoms. A study published today in Psychological Reports showed that after 3.5 months of practicing Transcendental Meditation (TM), most

Elements of gameplay are potential new tools in surgical resident education

Researchers at the University of Alabama at Birmingham have published a study in the peer-reviewed medical journal Laryngoscope exploring the merits of integrating gamification into the graduate medical education curriculum. “With gamification, we take aspects of gaming and put it in a learning software,” said senior author Do-Yeon Cho, M.D., director of Otolaryngology Research in

Does Social Media Push Teens to Depression? New Study Says No

FRIDAY, Feb. 8, 2019 — Time spent on Instagram, Snapchat or Facebook probably isn’t driving teenagers to depression, a new study contends. In fact, Canadian researchers found the relationship worked in the opposite direction — teenage girls who were already depressed tended to spend more time on social media, to try to feel better. These