Tag: new

Researchers explore new way of killing malaria in the liver

In the ongoing hunt for more effective weapons against malaria, international researchers said Thursday they are exploring a pathway that has until now been little studied—killing parasites in the liver, before the illness emerges. “It’s very difficult to work on the liver stage,” said Elizabeth Winzeler, professor of pharmacology and drug discovery at University of

Effective new target for mood-boosting brain stimulation found

Researchers have found an effective target in the brain for electrical stimulation to improve mood in people suffering from depression. As reported in the journal Current Biology on November 29, stimulation of a brain region called the lateral orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) reliably produced acute improvement in mood in patients who suffered from depression at the

New brain region ‘could be what makes humans unique’

Due to technological advancements in recent years, medical science has made huge leaps — many with vast implications for medical and neuroscientific research. For instance, scientists devised an innovative method that allowed them to record a million neurons at once, as well as to decode neural activity in real time. The techniques gave researchers access

The skinny on new sugar calorie counts

(HealthDay)—The U.S. Food and Drug Administration is getting serious about added sugars. Acting on the health recommendation that calories from added sugars shouldn’t exceed 10 percent of your daily total calories, new nutrition labels will break down a food’s sugar content so you can read how much added sugar it contains. The line for “sugars”

Brain signature of depressed mood unveiled in new study

Most of us have had moments when we’re feeling down—maybe we can’t stop thinking about our worst mistakes, or our most embarrassing memories—but for some, these poor mood states can be relentless and even debilitating. Now, new research from UC San Francisco has identified a common pattern of brain activity that may be behind those

New decision support tool improves discharge outcomes

In an effort to lessen readmission risk after discharge and achieve the best possible outcomes for patients, hospital-based clinicians are more intentionally planning discharge of those who require post-acute care (PAC). Yet, although hospital clinicians strive to effectively refer patients who require PAC, their discharge-planning processes often vary greatly and typically are not evidence-based. To

New findings add twist to screen time limit debate

Many parents want to know how much time their kids should be spending in front of screens, whether it’s their smartphones, tablets or TV. For years, the American Academy of Pediatrics had suggested a limit of two hours a day of TV for children and teens. But after screen time started to include phones and

Why getting fit before an operation could speed-up your recovery

Prehab is the new rehab! Why getting fit before an operation could speed-up your recovery There are around 250,000 high-risk operations a year in England and Wales Experts believe patients who improve their fitness in advance would aid healing Currently, ‘prehab’ is only offered in select hospitals because it’s relatively new We get in shape

From asexuality to heteroflexibility: 21st century ushers in new openness about intimate relationships

The 21st century has ushered in a “quiet revolution” in the diversity of intimate relationships, and a leading scholar says the scale and pace of this social transformation warrants a “reboot” of relationship studies. Social media and the internet have empowered individuals with diverse identities and relationship practices to find each other, raising awareness of

New diagnostic technique accounts for patient resilience

Medical diagnoses mostly focus on resolving isolated issues. But fixing one problem may create others, and even invoke an overall health collapse. Scientists now report a new approach to assess the risks of such collapse in humans and other animals using data from wearable sensors. Staying alive requires resilience, the capacity to bounce back from

New Research Offers Insights Into Football-Related Concussions

THURSDAY, Oct. 25, 2018 — Repeated hits to the head, rather than one severe blow, may determine whether football players suffer a concussion, a new study suggests. The findings underscore the need to limit head impacts during football practice and games, said study lead author Brian Stemper, of Marquette University and Medical College of Wisconsin.

Heart attack: New finding may change the face of treatment

Antibodies, or immunoglobulins (Ig), are a type of protein produced by plasma cells (a kind of blood cell). The immune system often co-opts these to fight potentially harmful foreign bodies. Now, researchers from the Karolinska Institutet in Solna, Sweden, have discovered that certain antibodies — once associated with rheumatic diseases — are also present in

First impressions count, new speech research confirms

Human beings make similar judgements of the trustworthiness and dominance of an unfamiliar speaker after hearing just a single word, new research shows, suggesting the old saying that ‘first impressions count’ might well be correct. In a research paper published in the journal PLOS One, researchers from the University of Glasgow in Scotland and Université