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Patients at risk of coverage denial

Researchers at Brigham and Women’s Hospital analyzed a national sample of Emergency Department visits between 2011-15 to determine what proportion of them could be denied coverage if commercial insurers across the U.S. adopted the policy of a large national insurer, Anthem, Inc., to potentially deny coverage, after the visit, based on ED discharge diagnoses. Researchers

Can a dose of strong cocoa help people with Raynaud’s disease?

People with a circulation condition called Primary Raynaud’s are being asked to help researchers at the University of Nottingham find out whether antioxidant compounds in cocoa can help alleviate symptoms. Raynaud’s is a circulatory condition in which the small blood vessels in the fingers or toes constrict in response to the cold. It can be

Juul Drawing Lots of Teen Followers on Twitter

FRIDAY, Oct. 19, 2018 — Though the maker of Juul e-cigarettes has claimed its product is aimed at adult smokers trying to quit, almost a quarter of the company’s Twitter followers are under 18, a new study finds. And many of these young fans are retweeting the company’s messages, investigators added. The findings are cause

Managing the complexities and risks of HIV and tuberculosis coinfection

A new study identified a significant association between HIV infection and complexities of treating patients with tuberculosis coinfection. Patients with HIV were more likely to have more tuberculosis drug-related adverse events, more hospital readmissions, and longer tuberculosis treatment duration, as reported in AIDS Research and Human Retroviruses, a peer-reviewed journal from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.,

Environmental factors may trigger onset of multiple sclerosis

A new Tel Aviv University study finds that certain environmental conditions may precipitate structural changes that take place in myelin sheaths in the onset of multiple sclerosis (MS). Myelin sheaths are the “insulating tape” surrounding axons; axons carry electrical impulses in neurons. The research demonstrates that myelin sheaths undergo structural transitions when triggered by changes

Number of Children Not Receiving Vaccines Slightly Increased

MONDAY, Oct. 15, 2018 — Overall, vaccine coverage for children aged 19 to 35 months remained high and stable from 2013 to 2017; however, a small, but growing number of children received no vaccinations, according to research published in the Oct. 12 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Morbidity and Mortality

How the grid cell system of the brain maps mental spaces

It has long been known that so-called place cells in the human hippocampus are responsible for coding one’s position in space. A related type of brain cell, called grid cells, encodes a variety of positions that are evenly distributed across space. This results in a kind of honeycomb pattern tiling the space. The cells exhibiting

Team’s study reveals hidden lives of medical biomarkers

What do medical biomarkers do on evenings and weekends, when they might be considered off the clock? The hidden lives of medical biomarkers are the focus of a recent study in Nature Communications by Jonathan Mosley, MD, Ph.D., assistant professor of Medicine and Biomedical Informatics, and colleagues from Vanderbilt University Medical Center and 11 other

Just one-third of Chinese acute coronary syndrome patients receive rehabilitation guidance

Just one-third of Chinese patients with acute coronary syndromes including heart attack receive cardiac rehabilitation guidance before discharge from hospital, according to research presented at the 29th Great Wall International Congress of Cardiology (GW-ICC). Only one in ten receive personalised advice. GW-ICC 2018 is being held 11 to 14 October in Beijing, China. Visiting experts