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Dana-Farber to present research on myeloma progression from precursor conditions

Dana-Farber Cancer Institute scientists will present research marking significant advances against the hematologic cancer multiple myeloma at the American Society of Hematology (ASH) Annual Meeting Dec. 1-4. Their findings provide new insights into the progression of the disease from precursor conditions and suggest approaches for novel treatments. In related work, Dana-Farber investigators will also present

6 Ways to Guarantee Your Kids Have Fun on Vacation

Vacations are supposed to be fun for the whole family, but parents and kids sometimes have different definitions of “fun.” Luckily, with a little bit of planning, you can make sure the whole gang has a blast on your getaway. From booking a stay at a resort that caters to kids to making some adjustments

The skinny on new sugar calorie counts

(HealthDay)—The U.S. Food and Drug Administration is getting serious about added sugars. Acting on the health recommendation that calories from added sugars shouldn’t exceed 10 percent of your daily total calories, new nutrition labels will break down a food’s sugar content so you can read how much added sugar it contains. The line for “sugars”

Olivia Wilde Is Dead Set on Teaching Her Toddlers This Life Lesson ASAP

Olivia Wilde’s children — her 4-year-old Otis and 1-year-old Daisy — are adorable. As children (and well-behaved children, no less), you wouldn’t necessarily think to call them "self-involved," but Wilde has described them that way herself. She’s not just being harsh, however. She has good reason for being brutally honest. The actor told InStyle just how

Mouse and human skin cells produce melanin on a 48-hour cycle

Researchers have discovered that mouse skin and skin cells from humans produce pigmentation in response to sunlight on a 48-hour cycle. They observed that exposing skin to ultraviolet light every 2 days yielded darker pigmentation with less radiation damage than daily exposure. The findings appear October 25 in the journal Molecular Cell. “The damaging effects

Juul Drawing Lots of Teen Followers on Twitter

FRIDAY, Oct. 19, 2018 — Though the maker of Juul e-cigarettes has claimed its product is aimed at adult smokers trying to quit, almost a quarter of the company’s Twitter followers are under 18, a new study finds. And many of these young fans are retweeting the company’s messages, investigators added. The findings are cause

Bug guts shed light on Central America Chagas disease

In Central America, Chagas disease, or American trypanosomiasis, is spread by the “kissing bug” Triatoma dimidiata. By collecting DNA from the guts of these bugs, researchers reporting in PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases have described patterns in the behavior of the bugs, the strain of parasite, and the communities of microbes that interact with the parasite.

Rare polio-like illness has US health authorities on alert

A rare disease that peaked this autumn and paralyzes its victims – mainly children – in ways similar to polio has put health authorities on alert across the United States. There is no known specific treatment for the disease, known as acute flaccid myelitis (AFM). Some patients who contracted AFM quickly recover, while others end

The skinny on fats

(HealthDay)—Even when you’re trying to lose weight, you need some fat in your diet for good health. While fat in general has gotten a bad rap, some types of fat—particularly plant-based fats—are good for you in moderation. Good-for-you fats: Olive, flaxseed oil and other plant-based oils. Fatty fish. Avocados. Walnuts, other nuts and their oils.

3/4 of adult day services centers keep advance directives on hand

(HealthDay)—Just over three-quarters of U.S. adult day services centers (ADSCs) maintain documentation of participants’ advance directives, according to a report published Sept. 12 by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention National Center for Health Statistics. Jessica Penn Lendon, Ph.D., from the National Center for Health Statistics in Hyattsville, Md., and colleagues used data

Polish lawmakers approve more talks on banning vaccinations

Lawmakers from Poland’s conservative ruling party have approved further parliamentary discussion over a controversial plan to abolish compulsory vaccinations for children, including those against serious diseases such as polio, measles, tuberculosis, rubella and whooping cough. A civic group that proposed the plan argues that the vaccinations can be hazardous to small children and insists that

HIV Infection Diagnoses on the Rise in Young Homosexual Men

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 26, 2018 — Among men who have sex with men (MSM), the change in the annual number of HIV diagnoses from 2008 to 2016 varies with age, according to research published in the Sept. 21 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report. Andrew Mitsch, M.P.H.,

When Should You Call CPS on Someone?

It seems like we only hear about Child Protective Services when terrible things happen. Like the five kids in Lansing, Michigan, who were locked in a “dungeon” without food, water or a chance to use the bathroom for days at a time over a period of at least six years. Naturally, Michigan CPS came under

AHA: Get Your (Exer)game On to Make Screen Time Pay Off

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 12, 2018 (American Heart Association) — Parents, can’t seem to tear the kids away from their screens? There are ways you won’t have to — and still get them off the couch. Exergaming allows players to engage in physical activity while also participating in video games — using a video camera, an infrared

My day on a plate: Jack Stein

Chef Jack Stein, 36, shares his day on a plate. Jack Stein. 7am I wake up and have a coffee. I'm really into coffee. 11am Bruschetta with good tomatoes; I've found a really nice seed bread that goes with it. My partner's family is Italian, so I'm trying to ingratiate myself with them with this

How the brain forgets on purpose

Researchers from Ruhr-Universität Bochum and the University Hospital of Gießen and Marburg, in collaboration with colleagues from Bonn, the Netherlands, and the UK, have analysed what happens in the brain when humans want to voluntarily forget something. They identified two areas of the brain – the prefrontal cortex and the hippocampus – whose activity patterns

Can changing our views on death improve how we live our lives?

Life is not possible without death and yet, modern medicine has waged an unending war against death. Now, a Notre Dame Institute for Advanced Study (NDIAS) residential fellow is exploring how the concept of kenosis might create a common ground for personal growth, mutual understanding, civil discourse and productive policymaking in today’s diverse and polarized