Tag: patients

Why hospitals underreport the number of patients they infect

Would hospitals lie? It’s an important question for patients, certainly, but also for insurers, regulators, and policymakers interested in containing medical costs. Mohsen Bayati of Stanford Graduate School of Business has examined a version of that question in recent research on how hospitals report infections for Medicare patients. “Before starting this project, I was reading

Treating stroke patients just 15 minutes earlier can save lives

Initiating stroke treatment just 15 minutes faster can save lives and prevent disability, according to a new UCLA-led study, published today in JAMA. The research also determined that busier hospitals—those that treat more than 450 people for stroke each year—have better outcomes than those that treat fewer than 400 stroke patients per year. Researchers at

Osteoporosis undertreated in joint replacement patients

(HealthDay)—Osteoporosis is common in patients undergoing total joint arthroplasty (TJA), yet the condition is often undertreated, according to a study published in the July issue of the Journal of Arthroplasty. James T. Bernatz, M.D., from the University of Wisconsin in Madison, and colleagues retrospectively reviewed medical records of 200 consecutive adults (106 female and 94

Study finds accuracy gap in EHRs for eye care patients

When it comes to keeping track of prescribed medications between clinic visits, many patients rely on printed medication lists automatically generated from electronic health records (EHRs). An examination of the EHRs of a cohort of ophthalmology patients revealed that one-third had at least one discrepancy between the medications discussed in the clinician’s notes and those

Hospitals may divert ambulances to avoid treating certain patients

Some hospitals may strategically divert ambulances to avoid treating low‐paying patients who are uninsured or who have Medicaid, according to a recent analysis. Charleen Hsuan, assistant professor of health policy and administration at Penn State, led a study that examined whether hospitals are more likely to temporarily close their emergency departments to ambulances—a process known

Watch ‘Miss Foot Fixer’ pull out a patient’s ingrown toenail

Gruesome footage captures ‘Miss Foot Fixer’ pulling out an ingrown toenail from a patient’s foot Podiatrist Marion Yau has a patient with a ‘ingrown toe and massive growth’ Stomach-churning footage shows her cutting away at the growth with pliers Then removes half of the unnamed patient’s toe after it was ‘hidden’ by growth  A stomach-churning video

Using data to decide when to transfer patients by medical helicopter

The increased use of medical helicopters over the last half-century has saved countless lives by quickly getting patients from trauma to the emergency room (ER) within the so-called “golden hour.” But a growing number of medical experts contend emergency helicopters may be overused in some transfer situations. Their concern: Patients stuck with an exorbitant cost

Revolutionising care for prostate cancer patients

An innovative new digital model of follow-up care for prostate cancer allows patients to see test results online as soon as they become available, after a report was published in BMC Cancer. Researchers from the University of Southampton, funded by the Movember Foundation and delivered in partnership with Prostate Cancer UK, trialled the True NTH

Risk for repeat concussion quantified for pediatric patients

(HealthDay)—A total of 16.2 percent of children with an index concussion experience at least one repeat concussion within two years, according to a study published online May 14 in The Journal of Pediatrics. Allison E. Curry, Ph.D., M.P.H., from the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, and colleagues queried electronic health records to identify a retrospective cohort

Trial remedies racial disparities in treatment for early-stage lung and breast cancer patients

Results from a study published in the Journal of the National Medical Association show that a pragmatic system-based intervention within cancer treatment centers can nearly eliminate existing disparities in treatment and outcomes for black patients with early-stage lung and breast cancer. The treatment completion rates before this intervention were 87.3 percent for white patients versus

Doctors unclear on legal obligations in caring for patients with disability

(HealthDay)—Practicing physicians might not understand their legal responsibilities when caring for people with disability, which may contribute to inequalities in their care, according to a study published online April 1 in Health Affairs. Nicole D. Agaronnik, from Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston, and colleagues interviewed 20 practicing physicians across five specialties to examine the knowledge