Tag: patients

Patients at risk of coverage denial

Researchers at Brigham and Women’s Hospital analyzed a national sample of Emergency Department visits between 2011-15 to determine what proportion of them could be denied coverage if commercial insurers across the U.S. adopted the policy of a large national insurer, Anthem, Inc., to potentially deny coverage, after the visit, based on ED discharge diagnoses. Researchers

New way to determine whether metastatic cancer cells in breast cancer patients are dormant or soon to turn deadly

For the first time ever, Mount Sinai researchers have identified a protein as a marker that can indicate whether a cancer patient will develop a reoccurrence of lethal, metastatic cancer, according to a clinical study published in Breast Cancer Research in October. The researchers found that when cells from a breast cancer patient’s original tumor

The man with ‘mushrooms’ in his ear

The man with ‘MUSHROOMS’ in his ear: Patient’s fungal infection causes ‘a forest’ of black blobs of mould to grow inside his ear canal The man in Vietnam reportedly experienced pain and itching in his ear At hospital doctors investigated and found a fungal infection in the ear canal  A UK expert says the fungi

Just one-third of Chinese acute coronary syndrome patients receive rehabilitation guidance

Just one-third of Chinese patients with acute coronary syndromes including heart attack receive cardiac rehabilitation guidance before discharge from hospital, according to research presented at the 29th Great Wall International Congress of Cardiology (GW-ICC). Only one in ten receive personalised advice. GW-ICC 2018 is being held 11 to 14 October in Beijing, China. Visiting experts

New risk test for sepsis for heart patients

Nearly one in four deaths in people with heart failure are caused by sepsis, according to new research. Now scientists from the University of Leeds, who are funded by the British Heart Foundation, have developed a ‘risk profile’ to identify patients who are most at risk, often years before they become ill. The researchers hope

New cancer vaccine shows early promise for patients with HER2-positive cancers

Treatment with a HER2-targeted therapeutic cancer vaccine provided clinical benefit to several patients with metastatic HER2-positive cancers who had not previously been treated with a HER2-targeted therapeutic, according to data from a phase I clinical trial presented at the Fourth CRI-CIMT-EATI-AACR International Cancer Immunotherapy Conference: Translating Science into Survival, held Sept. 30-Oct. 3. Among 11

Gun Victims More Likely to Die Than Other Trauma Patients

MONDAY, Sept. 24, 2018 — Gunshot wounds are far deadlier than other types of trauma, according to a new study. Gunshot victims are five times more likely to need a blood transfusion. They also require 10 times more blood units than people involved in falls, car accidents, stabbings or other assaults, according to researchers from

Alzheimer’s myths busted: The six most common misconceptions

Alzheimer’s myths busted: Experts reveal the six most common misconceptions patients have – which cause many to DELAY getting checked People worry they will have to stop driving, give up work, and lose their memory Approximately 50 million people around the world are living with dementia Alzheimer’s disease is the most common cause of the

Model Estimates Mortality in Patients Waiting for Hearts

MONDAY, Sept. 17, 2018 — For patients with advanced heart failure who are listed for transplantation, mortality risk is related to adverse events and end-organ dysfunction that vary over time, according to a study published in the Aug. 7 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology. Eugene H. Blackstone, M.D., from the

ADHD medication use is increasing but some patients in some countries are still not receiving the treatment they need

There has been an increase in the use of medications to treat attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in both adults and children between 2001 and 2015, according to a major observational study involving over 154 million individuals from 14 countries in Europe, North America, Asia, and Australasia, published in The Lancet Psychiatry journal. The study

Poor, non-English speaking cancer patients need support

(HealthDay)—There are steps health care providers can take to better support cancer patients who do not speak English, are underinsured, and may face other major financial challenges, according to an article published in Managed Healthcare Executive. In the article, Aditi Shastri, M.D., an oncologist who specializes in treating blood-related cancers at Montefiore Medical Center in

Hospital rating tools should allow patients to customize rankings

Publicly available hospital ratings and rankings should be modified to allow quality measures to be prioritized according to the needs and preferences of individual patients, according to a new RAND Corporation analysis. Writing in the Aug. 30 edition of the New England Journal of Medicine, researchers propose a new way of rating hospitals by creating