Tag: people

The Best & Worst Holiday Foods for Pregnant People

When it’s the holiday season, one thing’s for certain: You may be faced with pie. In fact, you may want to dig into a slice of pecan pie every hour on the hour until Santa shows up. And guess what. If you’re pregnant, those holiday cravings — pie or otherwise — are likely raging wild.

Anxious people respond worst to bushfire threat

Research from The University of Western Australia has found people who are anxious or easily stressed are less likely to be well prepared or respond well to bushfires. It comes days after a new bushfire season campaign was launched by the State Government to raise awareness about the realities of catastrophic and severe fires. UWA

Can Superman trigger heroic helping in people?

Might people be more likely to help a stranger or donate money immediately after watching the latest Marvel film? Heroes demonstrate extraordinary courage, go to great lengths to help others, and live meaningful lives. They are inspirational moral examples for many people—but do their heroic actions trigger people to give a helping hand themselves? A

Improved rescue kits for people with diabetes, hypoglycemia

Being with someone who has diabetes and needs immediate care to avoid a coma can be a frightening situation. Even worse, current products and injection kits to help in those emergencies can be complicated to use. Now Purdue University researchers are working on a solution similar to common EpiPen devices that could help diabetic patients

Higher fruit and veg prices after Brexit could kill 5,600 people

Brexit could KILL 5,600 people a year by making fruit and veg unaffordable meaning their diets are no longer healthy enough, warns Oxford University researcher Worsening diets could lead to more cancer, stroke and heart disease  More illnesses might cost the NHS £600million extra each year, researchers say The UK imports more than 90 per

Can a dose of strong cocoa help people with Raynaud’s disease?

People with a circulation condition called Primary Raynaud’s are being asked to help researchers at the University of Nottingham find out whether antioxidant compounds in cocoa can help alleviate symptoms. Raynaud’s is a circulatory condition in which the small blood vessels in the fingers or toes constrict in response to the cold. It can be

New technology could help people with paralysis to speak again

Recent research led by Northwestern University in Evanston, IL, finds that the brain generates speech sounds in a similar way to how it controls hand and arm movements. The finding brings closer the day when people who are paralyzed — such as individuals with “locked-in syndrome” — will be able to speak through a “brain-machine

How the smell of disease can affect healthy people

Disease and infection can alter bodily odor. This mechanism is an important tool, albeit one that we are not usually aware of, in guiding social interactions self-preservation mechanisms. If we can “sense” that a stranger on the bus has a cold, we may instinctively avoid sitting down next to them. Previous research has shown that

Eight of ten people with cancer risk genes don’t know it

Genomic screening of more than 50,000 people shows that more than 80% of those who carry an identifiable genetic risk for breast, ovarian, prostate, and pancreatic cancer don’t know it despite frequent interaction with the healthcare system. The findings were published Sept. 21 in the journal JAMA Network Open. In the absence of routine screening,

Caffeine consumption may extend life expectancy for people with kidney disease

A new study in Nephrology Dialysis Transplantation indicates that consuming more caffeine may help reduce the risk of death for people with chronic kidney disease. An inverse relationship between coffee consumption and mortality has been reported in the general population. However, the association between caffeine consumption and mortality for people with chronic kidney disease remains

People with low muscle strength more likely to die prematurely

Individuals with weaker muscles do not typically live as long as their stronger peers, according to new research from the University of Michigan. After adjusting for sociodemographic factors, chronic health conditions and smoking history, the study published in the Journal of Gerontology: Medical Sciences found that people with low muscle strength are 50 percent more