Tag: Perception

Virtual reality motion sickness may be predicted and counteracted

Researchers at the University of Waterloo have made progress towards predicting who is likely to feel sick from virtual reality technology. In a recent study, the researchers found they could predict whether an individual will experience cybersickness (motion sickness caused by virtual reality) by how much they sway in response to a moving visual field.

Brain arousal compound noradrenaline plays critical role in sensory perception: Discovery paves way for detecting situations of dangerous lapses and for improving anesthesia protocols

Being aware of our surroundings is a fundamental aspect of our existence. But what in our biological makeup determines how we access and interpret the endless stream of information around us? A new Tel Aviv University study published in Current Biology suggests that noradrenaline, a neurotransmitter responsible for arousal in the brain, plays a vital

Dorsal reduction adds to social perception of rhinoplasty

(HealthDay)—Dorsal reduction has a greater effect than tip manipulation in adding value to social perception of the facial profile of patients undergoing cosmetic rhinoplasty, according to a study published online June 7 in JAMA Facial Plastic Surgery. Cherian K. Kandathil, M.D., from Stanford University in California, and colleagues assessed the social perception of four patients

Are you really you when you’re hungry? Hunger can lead to anger, but it’s more complicated than a drop in blood sugar, study says

What makes someone go from simply being hungry to full-on “hangry”? More than just a simple drop in blood sugar, this combination of hunger and anger may be a complicated emotional response involving an interplay of biology, personality and environmental cues, according to research published by the American Psychological Association. “We all know that hunger

It’s about time: Immediate rewards boost workplace motivation

Struggling to finish that report for your boss? One way to increase your interest in a task is to add immediate rewards, rather than wait until the end to reward yourself, according to new Cornell research published in the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology titled “It’s About Time: Earlier Rewards Increase Intrinsic Motivation.” Kaitlin