Tag: Racial Issues

Looking at how the brain reacts to boredom could help people cope

Boredom is a common human experience. But how people cope with or handle being bored is important for mental health. “Everybody experiences boredom,” said Sammy Perone, Washington State University assistant professor in the Department of Human Development. “But some people experience it a lot, which is unhealthy. So, we wanted to look at how to

Growing life expectancy inequality in US cannot be blamed on opioids alone

A new University of Michigan study challenges a popularized view about what’s causing the growing gap between the lifespans of more- and less-educated Americans — finding shortcomings in the widespread narrative that the United States is facing an epidemic of “despair.” Some influential studies have argued that growing life expectancy inequality is driven by so-called

How language developed: Comprehension learning precedes vocal production: Green monkeys’ alarm calls allow conclusions about the evolution of language

Human language and communication skills are unique in the animal kingdom. How they developed in the course of evolution is being researched, among other things, using the alarm call system of vervet monkeys. East African vervet monkeys warn their conspecifics against predators with special alarm calls that mean “leopard,” “eagle” or “snake.” In a recently

People with obesity often ‘dehumanized,’ study finds

New research, published in Obesity, has found that people with obesity are not only stigmatised, but are blatantly dehumanised. Obesity is now very common in most of developed countries. Around one third of US adults and one quarter of UK adults are now medically defined as having obesity. However, obesity is a complex medical condition

More is better when coordinating with others

Researchers at Tokyo Institute of Technology, Imperial College London and the University of Tokyo have demonstrated that physical coordination is more beneficial in larger groups. The researchers used robotic interfaces to test coordination in groups of two, three and four partners, and found that performance was improving with every additional group member. The researchers believe

Oral contraceptives could impair women’s recognition of complex emotions: Healthy women who use birth control pills are poorer judges of subtle facial expressions than non-users, according to new research

The pill could be blurring your social judgement — but perhaps not enough so you’d notice. By challenging women to identify complex emotional expressions like pride or contempt, rather than basic ones like happiness or fear, scientists have revealed subtle changes in emotion recognition associated with oral contraceptive pill (OCP) use. Published in Frontiers in

How gender disparities in salary add up over a lifetime

Around the country, women physician researchers make 7 to 8 percent less per year than men. At the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, efforts to eliminate such a gender disparity have cut the difference in salaries from 2.6 percent in 2005 to a statistically insignificant 1.9 percent in 2016. But even with that improvement

Muscular men prefer an unequal society

Men with large upper-bodies have a tendency to favour inequality in society and a limited redistribution of resources. This is the conclusion drawn by Professor Michael Bang Petersen and Associate Professor Lasse Laustsen from the Department of Political Science in a study published in the journal, Political Psychology. “The results challenge the belief that our

Scientists map interactions between head and neck cancer and HPV virus: Connecting the dots between human papillomavirus and smoking-related cancers

Human papillomavirus (HPV) is widely known to cause nearly all cases of cervical cancer. However, you might not know that HPV also causes 70 percent of oropharyngeal cancer, a subset of head and neck cancers that affect the mouth, tongue, and tonsils. Although vaccines that protect against HPV infection are now available, they are not

Partnership problems and not career planning mainly explain why women are freezing their eggs: Fertility clinics urged to make patient-centred care for single women ‘a high priority’

Contrary to common suggestion, women are opting to freeze their eggs not to pursue education or careers but for reasons “mostly revolving around women’s lack of stable partnerships with men committed to marriage and parenting.” This is the conclusion of the largest qualitative study so far in elective egg freezing; 150 subjects from four IVF

Social bonding key cause of soccer (football) violence

As World Cup fever sets in, increased hooliganism and football related violence are legitimate international concerns. Previous research has linked sports-related hooliganism to ‘social maladjustment’ e.g. previous episodes of violence or dysfunctional behaviour at home, work or school etc. However, social bonding and a desire to protect and defend other fans may be one of

Writing away the body image blues: Study suggests different mental frameworks women can use to get out of body image rut

Body dissatisfaction among women is widespread and can lead to a number of worrisome outcomes, including eating disorders, depression and anxiety. While researchers know a lot about what makes women’s body image worse, they are still short on empirically supported interventions for improving women’s body image. Renee Engeln, a professor of instruction in psychology in

What doctors wear really does matter, study finds: Survey of more than 4,000 patients isn’t just about fashion — patient satisfaction may be affected

Physicians may want to dig a little deeper into their closets, or grab their white coats on the way out of the operating room, if they want patients to view them favorably, according to the largest-ever study of patient preferences for doctors’ attire. In fact, what medical doctors wear may matter more than most doctors

How humans repress prejudices: Even people who would describe themselves as liberal and open-minded might not be free of unconscious racism

Bochum-based philosopher Dr Beate Krickel has used psychoanalysis to investigate why people are often not aware of their prejudices. In her accounts, she has been elaborating how prejudices can become unconscious. As researcher at the Institute of Philosophy II at Ruhr-Universität Bochum, she outlines her theory in the journal Philosophical Psychology from May 15, 2018.