Tag: research

Research reveals how the Internet may be changing the brain

An international team of researchers from Western Sydney University, Harvard University, Kings College, Oxford University and University of Manchester have found the Internet can produce both acute and sustained alterations in specific areas of cognition, which may reflect changes in the brain, affecting our attentional capacities, memory processes, and social interactions. In a first of

Tweeting their own horn: Author self-promotion on Twitter increases research dissemination

Researchers from the University of Toronto presented a new study at CHEST Congress 2019 Thailand in Bangkok that aimed to determine the effect of authors’ self-promotion on the social media site, Twitter, in regards to the dissemination of their research. Tweets referencing scientific articles published between June 2011-January 2017 were gathered through Altmetric.com. The study

Research highlights need to improve access to healthcare for high-needs patients

University of Otago researchers have highlighted the need to improve access to primary health care services for high-needs populations with their recent study of high-needs patients using a free health clinic finding significant health problems. Elaine Gurr Professor of General Practice Tim Stokes, Research Fellow Lauralie Richard and medical student Sharmaine Sreedhar, undertook the study

New kidney research sheds light on harms of certain drugs

Scientists have identified an enzyme that is a “master regulator” of kidney function that if excessively suppressed, can trigger renal failure. Their findings have implications for the use of existing drugs and the development of new pharmaceuticals. As reported in Nature Communications, a global research team led by the University of Bristol studied how the

Research team traces pathway to cardioprotection in post-ischemic heart failure

During an ischemic attack, the heart is temporarily robbed of its blood supply. The aftermath is devastating: reduced heart contractility, heart cell death, and heart failure. Contributing to these detrimental changes is a signaling molecule, G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 (GRK2), which following ischemia accumulates in mitochondria, the energy-producing powerhouses of cells. Now, a Temple-led

Dana-Farber to present research on myeloma progression from precursor conditions

Dana-Farber Cancer Institute scientists will present research marking significant advances against the hematologic cancer multiple myeloma at the American Society of Hematology (ASH) Annual Meeting Dec. 1-4. Their findings provide new insights into the progression of the disease from precursor conditions and suggest approaches for novel treatments. In related work, Dana-Farber investigators will also present

Traversing the interfaces in medical research

The continually rising health care costs in Germany require cost intelligent innovations at the intersecting frontiers of scientific disciplines. Prof. Gerd Geisslinger is Medical Research Officer for the Fraunhofer-Gesellschaft. In this interview he explains why the Fraunhofer-Gesellschaft is in a unique position to tackle challenges in medical research and to pull together the four major

New Research Offers Insights Into Football-Related Concussions

THURSDAY, Oct. 25, 2018 — Repeated hits to the head, rather than one severe blow, may determine whether football players suffer a concussion, a new study suggests. The findings underscore the need to limit head impacts during football practice and games, said study lead author Brian Stemper, of Marquette University and Medical College of Wisconsin.

First impressions count, new speech research confirms

Human beings make similar judgements of the trustworthiness and dominance of an unfamiliar speaker after hearing just a single word, new research shows, suggesting the old saying that ‘first impressions count’ might well be correct. In a research paper published in the journal PLOS One, researchers from the University of Glasgow in Scotland and Université