Tag: Researchers

Researchers develop innovative treatment for familial adenomatous polyposis

Researchers from Tel Aviv University and Tel Aviv Sourasky Medical Center (Ichilov Hospital) have developed an innovative drug treatment for familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP), a rare, inherited condition that affects adolescents and young adults and often leads to colorectal cancer. The novel drug, based on antibiotics, inhibits the development of intestinal polyps that, left untreated,

Researchers discover potential drug to treat heart attacks

A potential drug to treat heart attacks and to prevent heart failure—for which no cure currently exists—may result from pioneering research by a University of Guelph professor. Prof. Tami Martino, Department of Biomedical Sciences, and Ph.D. student Cristine Reitz have discovered what they believe is a novel drug target controlling the body’s repair responses after

Researchers identify rare inherited immune disease

When a 9-year-old girl with anemia, breathing problems, and recurrent infections sought help for her mysterious ailments, Yale researchers and their collaborators at the National Institutes of Health sequenced her genes to pinpoint a cause. What they discovered was not only a new disease but unexpected new roles for a gene that affects the immune

Researchers probe microbiome-cancer treatment link

Cancer immunotherapies have given patients with particularly intractable cancers new hope, but not everyone benefits. One such immunotherapy, known as CAR T-cell therapy, works only in about a third of the people who take it—and the reason may lie in the microbes residing in our guts. Over the next year, a team of Stanford and

Researchers study effect of Mediterranean diet on pregnancy outcomes

A Mediterranean-style diet in pregnancy does not reduce the risk of overall adverse maternal and offspring complications, but may reduce weight gain during pregnancy and the risk of gestational diabetes, according to a new study published this week in PLOS Medicine by Shakila Thangaratinam of Queen Mary University of London, UK, and colleagues. A Mediterranean-style

Researchers look to unlock post-traumatic stress disorder puzzle

A team of Penn State and University of Puerto Rico School of Medicine researchers is attempting to answer a question that has long puzzled experts: Why do some individuals suffer post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) after experiencing trauma, and others do not? The research, led by Nanyin Zhang, professor of biomedical engineering and Lloyd & Dorothy

Researchers improve classification of pancreatic cancer to better predict patient outcomes

Researchers at the University of Toronto and University Health Network have found that standard pathology grading for the most common type of pancreatic cancer can be improved to better predict patient outcomes. The research shows that conventional, histological analysis of pancreatic tumours—based in part on morphology, or shape and structure—can better predict outcomes by taking

Researchers uncover new sarcoma gene

A team of WA researchers has uncovered new genes that could play an important role in the development of sarcoma, a group of rare bone, muscle and connective tissue cancers. The study, undertaken by Ph.D. student Rachel Jones and led by Associate Professor Evan Ingley from the Harry Perkins Institute of Medical Research and Murdoch

Researchers first to develop comprehensive models of ‘seeds and soil’ as a means to combat breast cancer metastasis

Scientists at VCU Massey Cancer Center have identified key biological pathways that regulate the spread of tumor cells to vital organs. These findings may have a significant influence on the development of new therapies that slow or prevent breast cancer metastasis. Metastasis refers to the spread of cancer cells to other organs, and the likelihood

Researchers look back in time to prevent future brain injuries

University of Toronto researchers used a novel data-mining approach to uncover the most common medical problems affecting people in the time before they suffered a traumatic brain injury (TBI). The results can be used to better predict and prevent these life-altering incidents. Professor Michael Escobar, a biostatistician at the Dalla Lana School of Public Health,