Tag: study

Team’s study reveals hidden lives of medical biomarkers

What do medical biomarkers do on evenings and weekends, when they might be considered off the clock? The hidden lives of medical biomarkers are the focus of a recent study in Nature Communications by Jonathan Mosley, MD, Ph.D., assistant professor of Medicine and Biomedical Informatics, and colleagues from Vanderbilt University Medical Center and 11 other

New study finds thalamus wakes the brain during development

Consciousness requires continuous, internally generated activity in the brain. The modulation of this activity is the basis of the electroencephalogram (EEG) and of generation of sleep, dreams, and perception. Achieving such activity is thus an important milestone in normal brain maturation, which occurs around birth. Successful transition to this activity indicates a good prognosis for

It Just Doesn’t Pay to Be Nice, Study Finds

THURSDAY, Oct. 11, 2018 — When it comes to money, nice people really are more likely to finish last, a new study suggests. Researchers analyzed data from more than 3 million people and found that those who were nice were at increased risk for bankruptcy and other financial problems. Why? They just don’t value money

Acne stigma linked to lower overall quality of life, study finds

Many people with acne are negatively impacted by perceived social stigma around the skin condition, a new study from University of Limerick (UL), Ireland, has found. A survey of 271 acne sufferers has revealed that their own negative perceptions of how society views their appearance is associated with higher psychological distress levels and further physical

Active shooter study: Semi-automatic rifles more deadly

Active shooters with semi-automatic rifles wound and kill twice as many people as those using non-automatic weapons, although chances of dying if hit in either type of assault are the same, a new analysis shows. Researchers examined FBI data on nearly 250 active shooter incidents in the United States since 2000. Almost 900 people were

Widely used youth behaviour treatment may be ineffective: study

A long-established treatment used around the world to help troubled young people and their families tackle behavioural problems may not be as effective as its practitioners claim—a new study reveals. Functional Family Therapy (FFT) is a short-term, evidence-based intervention provided at over 270 sites worldwide—mostly within the US, but also in Belgium, Ireland, The Netherlands,

LGBT Americans typically poorer than straight peers: study

(HealthDay)—LGBT people in the United States are more likely than their straight counterparts to be poor, and this is especially true for women, a new study says. Wealth plays a key role in health and well-being, and it’s one factor in the poorer health for this group that could be changed, according to the researchers.

Dementia symptoms peak in winter and spring, study finds

Adults both with and without Alzheimer’s disease have better cognition skills in the late summer and early fall than in the winter and spring, according to a new study published this week in PLOS Medicine by Andrew Lim of Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre and the University of Toronto, Canada, and colleagues. There have been few

Drug-resistant superbug spreading in hospitals: study

A superbug resistant to all known antibiotics that can cause “severe” infections or even death is spreading undetected through hospital wards across the world, scientists in Australia warned on Monday. Researchers at the University of Melbourne discovered three variants of the multidrug-resistant bug in samples from 10 countries, including strains in Europe that cannot be