Tag: study

Network analysis applied to the study of cerebral macroanatomy

The CENIEH researcher Emiliano Bruner has led a study which uses networks to investigate the geometric relationship among the principal regions of the cerebral cortex. Network analysis is used in fields as diverse as economics, engineering and sociology to analyze relationships among elements. Emiliano Bruner, a paleoneurologist at the Centro Nacional de Investigación sobre la

Babies can learn link between language and ethnicity, study suggests

Eleven-month-old infants can learn to associate the language they hear with ethnicity, recent research from the University of British Columbia suggests. The study, published April 22 by Developmental Psychobiology, found that 11-month-old infants looked more at the faces of people of Asian descent versus those of Caucasian descent when hearing Cantonese versus English—but not when

Study ties poor sleep to reduced memory performance in older adults

A new study has found that variability in night-to-night sleep time and reduced sleep quality adversely affect the ability of older adults to recall information about past events. The study also found unexpected racial differences in the type of sleep patterns tied to lower memory performance across both younger and older African American research participants.

Study finds accuracy gap in EHRs for eye care patients

When it comes to keeping track of prescribed medications between clinic visits, many patients rely on printed medication lists automatically generated from electronic health records (EHRs). An examination of the EHRs of a cohort of ophthalmology patients revealed that one-third had at least one discrepancy between the medications discussed in the clinician’s notes and those

One day of employment a week is all we need for mental health benefits: study

As automation advances, predictions of a jobless future have some fearing unrest from mass unemployment, while others imagine a more contented work-free society. Aside from economic factors, paid employment brings other benefits—often psychological—such as self-esteem and social inclusion. Now, researchers at the universities of Cambridge and Salford have set out to define a recommended “dosage”

Study examines consequences of workplace bullying

New research reveals how frequently being the target of workplace bullying not only leads to health-related problems but can also cause victims to behave badly themselves. The study, led by the University of East Anglia (UEA) in collaboration with Uninettuno Telematic International University in Italy, found that in some cases this is characterised by a

Stoners Weigh Less Than Everyone Else, Says New Study

Stoners are known for eating frozen pizza rolls and other questionable snacks when they get high. Naturally, you’d think all those empty calories could cause weight problems, but a new study says that isn’t the case. People who regularly smoke weed are less likely to be overweight or obese compared to those who abstain, according

Health claims on children’s food ‘are confusing’

Three quarters of ‘healthy’ children’s food claiming to have ‘one of five-a-day’ fruit and vegetables DOESN’T have the recommended portion size –and may be fuelling obesity Researchers from the University of Glasgow tested 332 supermarket products They found 41 per cent of them were less healthy than they claimed to be Claims of no added

Study illuminates the brain’s inner workings

Like instruments in an orchestra, different parts of the human brain work together to help us perform the functions of daily life, ranging from breathing and sleeping to reading, walking and learning. But which areas of the brain work in harmony to accomplish certain types of tasks? And how does this coordination vary from person

Prostate cancer rates and deaths have plummeted worldwid

Prostate cancer and death rates have plummeted worldwide, study reveals About one in nine men develop prostate cancer over the course of their lives  In 1994, a blood test for the cancer was approved by the FDA  But the test led to over-diagnosis and has fallen out of favor  In 44 countries, prostate cancer rates

A Mozart playlist improved mortality in epileptic mice, study finds

A Mozart playlist improved mortality in epileptic mice, surprising study finds 80% of epileptic mice exposed to Mozart survived by the end of the 21-day study Only 50% of control epileptic mice, who were not exposed to music, survived The researchers at Utah said the findings were ‘fascinating’, ‘unexpected’, and ‘a huge discovery’  e-mail View

Drug-resistant tuberculosis: A new study offers new hope

Tuberculosis (TB) is the leading cause of death in the world from a single infectious disease, causing more deaths than HIV/AIDS. In 2017, 10 million people developed TB disease globally and an estimated 1.6 million died. One of the biggest blocks to beating the epidemic is the growing resistance to drugs that have previously cured