Tag: survival

Medicaid Expansion Tied to Better Kidney Disease Survival

TUESDAY, Nov. 6, 2018 — There were significant improvements in one-year survival among patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) initiating dialysis following Medicaid expansion with the Affordable Care Act, according to a study published online Oct. 25 in the Journal of the American Medical Association. Shailender Swaminathan, Ph.D., from the Brown University School of Public

Treatment tied to survival benefit in complex bladder cancer

(HealthDay)—Cancer treatment is associated with a clinically meaningful survival benefit in older, medically complex patients with superficial bladder cancer (SBC), according to a study published online Oct. 5 in Cancer. Tullika Garg, M.D., M.P.H., from Geisinger in Danville, Pa., and colleagues evaluated the association between treatment of SBC and 10-year mortality in 1,800 medically complex

In NSCLC, Longer Survival With Brigatinib Than Crizotinib

MONDAY, Oct. 15, 2018 — Among patients with anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK)-positive non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) who have not previously received an ALK inhibitor, progression-free survival is significantly longer in those who receive treatment with brigatinib versus crizotinib, according to a study published online Sept. 25 in the New England Journal of Medicine. D.

High-risk HPV linked to improved survival in cervical cancer

The presence of the human high-risk papillomavirus (hrHPV) in the diagnosis of invasive cervical cancer is linked to a greatly improved prognosis compared to cases in which hrHPV cannot be identified in the tumour, according to researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden, who have published their results in the scientific journal PLOS Medicine. The researchers

MGMT promoter methylation associated with improved survival for patients with WHO Grade II Gliomas

Further exploration into the endpoints of the NRG Oncology/RTOG 0424 trial resulted in the discovery that MGMT promoter methylation is an independent prognostic biomarker of high-risk, low-grade glioma treated with temozolomide and radiation. This is the first study of its kind to validate the prognostic significance of MGMT promoter methylation in this patient population and

Balanced diet may be key to cancer survival

(HealthDay)—Eating a nutritionally balanced high-quality diet may lower a cancer patient’s risk of dying by as much as 65 percent, new research suggests. The finding that total diet, rather than specific nutritional components, can affect a cancer patient’s prognosis “was particularly surprising to us,” said the study’s lead author, Ashish Deshmukh. Total diet, he explained,

Surveillance intensity not associated with earlier detection of recurrence or improved survival in colorectal cancer

A national retrospective study led by researchers at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center found no association between intensity of post-treatment surveillance and detection of recurrence or overall survival (OS) in patients with stage I, II or III colorectal cancer (CRC). Published in the Journal of the American Medical Association, the study is

Treating muscle wasting improved cancer survival

Researchers from the University of Jyväskylä in Finland have found that continued treatment of muscle wasting with a soluble growth factor receptor protein, produced at the University of Helsinki, improved survival in a pre-clinical cancer model without affecting the tumour size. This effect was not found when the mice were treated with the recombinant protein

Immunotherapy provides long-term survival benefit: Further evidence in lung cancer

Further evidence that immunotherapy provides long-term survival benefit for patients with lung cancer was presented today at ELCC 2018 (European Lung Cancer Congress) in Geneva, Switzerland. Researchers presented the three-year survival results of the randomised phase 2 POPLAR trial in second line, which is the longest follow-up reported to date with anti-programmed death ligand 1

New drug combo improves survival of women with rare uterine cancer

Adding the monoclonal antibody drug trastuzumab—already used to treat certain breast cancers—to the chemotherapy regimen of women with a rare form of uterine cancer lengthens the amount of time their tumors are kept from growing, according to Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers conducting a small phase II trial of the regimen, testing its safety and value.