Tag: that

Research discoveries suggest that leucine-histidine dipeptide improves mental health

A research group led by Professor Tomoyuki Furuyashiki and Associate Professor Shiho Kitaoka (Graduate School of Medicine) in collaboration with researcher Yasuhisa Ano of Kirin Holdings have made discoveries regarding the effect of the dipeptide leucine-histidine (LH) in suppressing microglial activation and depression-associated emotional disturbances. LH dipeptide is found in fermented foods such as blue

The One Thing That May Actually Change Anti-Vaxxers' Minds

While anti-vaxxers are a relatively small portion of the population, they are growing. Since 2001, the number of unvaccinated kids has quadrupled, which puts not only those children at risk but also anyone around them who is too young or too immunocompromised to receive vaccines themselves. The anti-vax movement is also growing more vocal both

Seven signs that you're over-exercising

With so much pressure to go to the gym and get active it can be hard to take a step back and recognise when you’re pushing yourself too hard. The release of endorphins can be addictive and 3% of gym goers consider themselves to be addicted to working out. While hitting the gym every day

Five animals that could help us beat human diseases

As humans, we may feel rather lucky about our evolutionary lot. We live longer than many other animals, and lifespans continue to increase thanks to better diets, advances in medicine and improved public health. But our quest to beat aging and the diseases that come with aging continues. Osteoarthritis rates, for example, have doubled since

20 High-Protein Smoothies That Actually Keep You Full

Smoothies are a great way to get a nutrient-packed meal or snack, stat. They provide everything you need — protein, healthy fats, vegetables, and fruits — all in one convenient package. “Smoothies make for a convenient, portable, and easy meal (or snack) with no cooking skills required,” says sports dietitian Marni Sumbal, MS, CSSD and

Hearing through your fingers: Device that converts speech

A novel study published in Restorative Neurology and Neuroscience provides the first evidence that a simple and inexpensive non-invasive speech-to-touch sensory substitution device has the potential to improve hearing in hearing-impaired cochlear implant patients, as well as individuals with normal hearing, to better discern speech in various situations like learning a second language or trying