Tag: their

7 Things Therapists Wish Their Clients Knew

Myths about therapy and therapists abound in American culture. The therapeutic process is often shrouded in mystery and misconceptions, and there are things therapists really wish their clients knew. Stigmas about mental illness and what actually happens in a therapist’s office can undermine a person’s healing process — while also sometimes deterring people from getting the

More Americans Are Raising Their Grandkids

MONDAY, Nov. 5, 2018 — More than 3 million older Americans are now raising their grandchildren as their own, even as they struggle with health problems and financial stresses, a new survey shows. Not only that, the children they take in are more likely to be troubled as they struggle to adjust to new lives,

Young children with heart disease and their families may have poorer quality of life than the general population

A study by medical researchers from UNSW Sydney and the Sydney Children’s Hospitals Network has shown that young children with heart disease and their families may have poorer quality of life than the general population, leading to calls for routine screening to enable early intervention and better outcomes. The paper – the largest Australian study

Should Parents Care What Their Teen Wears?

"I can’t believe she goes out dressed like that."  "I wish she’d dress more appropriately." "She’s showing off far too much skin." These are all things I’ve heard parents of teenage girls say. I’m still a few years away from that stage with my own daughter, but I’ve seen firsthand how much tension can be

Grip strength of children gives clues about their future health

While other studies have shown that muscle weakness as measured by grip strength is a predictor of unhealthy outcomes—including cardiovascular and metabolic diseases, disability and even early mortality—this is the first to do so for adolescent health over time, a Baylor University researcher said. “What we know about today’s kids is that because of the

How 10 Parents Give Their Kids Downtime

Wake up. Get dressed. Eat breakfast. School drop-off. Soccer for one kid. Gymnastics for the other. Dinner. Homework. Sleep. If this kind of super-regimented routine sounds familiar, well, that’s no surprise. Today, children under 12 have precipitously less free time than any generation before theirs, as unstructured play and moments of respite have taken a

Parents’ Childhood Affects Their Children’s Behavioral Health

TUESDAY, July 24, 2018 — Parents’ adverse childhood events (ACEs), such as abuse, neglect, or household dysfunction, can impact their children’s lives, according to a study published online July 9 in Pediatrics. Adam Schickedanz, M.D., Ph.D., from the University of California in Los Angeles, and colleagues assessed whether parents’ ACEs confer intergenerational risk to their

Are birth mothers satisfied with their decisions to place children for adoption? Time will tell, study says

New research findings from Baylor University’s Diana R. Garland School of Social Work could change the adoption landscape for birth mothers struggling with the life-altering decision to place their children. There is consensus among adoption researchers that for many birth mothers the experience of placing their children for adoption brings feelings of grief, loss, shame,

Why people around the world trip over their tongues sometimes

(HealthDay)—Can’t quite spit out the right, uh, word at times? A new study helps explain why. European researchers analyzed thousands of recordings of spontaneous speech in different languages from around the world. They included English and Dutch speakers as well as conversation from people in the Amazon rainforest, Siberia, the Himalayas and the Kalahari desert.