Tag: time

Is year-round daylight saving time a good idea? Maybe not

If you were yawning more than usual thanks to last week’s switch to daylight saving time, you weren’t alone. It takes some people a full week to recover from feeling more sluggish than usual after rolling back the clock for daylight saving time. Experts call the phenomenon “social jet lag.” Much like the jet lag

Painless ways to limit your kids’ screen time

(HealthDay)—If you’re in a frequent tug of war with your kids over turning off their gadgets, it could be the tactic you use when you try to persuade them to disengage. It turns out that giving 1- to 5-year-olds a time warning that screen viewing is about to end makes the transition away from a

Does the time of year really impact your mood?

When daylight saving time ends in late fall, it is common to start experiencing an onset of mild depressive feelings and tendencies, often coined as “winter blues.” Energy levels seem to decrease with the temperature drop, people tend to feel more tired and sluggish, and there is an element of dread that occurs when one’s

Screen Time Linked to Poorer Child Developmental Performance

MONDAY, Jan. 28, 2019 — Screen time is associated with poorer performance on developmental screening tests among young children, according to a study published online Jan. 28 in JAMA Pediatrics. Sheri Madigan, Ph.D., from the University of Calgary in Alberta, Canada, and colleagues examined the directional association between screen time and child development in a

Baby erupts in laughter after hearing clearly for first time

Baby Scarlet was treated for a bacterial infection shortly after birth, but lost some of her hearing in the process.  (Fox 5 Atlanta) The sweet moment a Georgia baby heard clearly for the very first time was caught and shared on Facebook by the 11-month-old girl’s ecstatic family. Scarlet Benjamin, who was born three months

New findings add twist to screen time limit debate

Many parents want to know how much time their kids should be spending in front of screens, whether it’s their smartphones, tablets or TV. For years, the American Academy of Pediatrics had suggested a limit of two hours a day of TV for children and teens. But after screen time started to include phones and

Limiting children’s recreational screen time to less than two hours a day linked to better cognition

Only one in 20 US children in the study met the full recommended guidelines on recreational screen time, physical activity and sleep. Limiting recreational screen time to less than two hours a day, and having sufficient sleep and physical activity is associated with improved cognition, compared with not meeting any recommendations, according to an observational

AHA: Get Your (Exer)game On to Make Screen Time Pay Off

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 12, 2018 (American Heart Association) — Parents, can’t seem to tear the kids away from their screens? There are ways you won’t have to — and still get them off the couch. Exergaming allows players to engage in physical activity while also participating in video games — using a video camera, an infrared

Do You Know Your ‘Body Time’?

TUESDAY, Sept. 11, 2018 — No matter what your watch says, your body may be on a whole other schedule. Now, scientists say they’ve created a blood test that pinpoints the timing of your own internal clock. The TimeSignature test evaluates dozens of genes to reveal an individual’s “circadian rhythm” — the crests and troughs

For the first time, a neural link between altruism and empathy toward strangers

Giving up a kidney to a stranger requires a certain sense of selflessness, what’s come to be known in social science as extraordinary altruism. University of Pennsylvania psychologist Kristin Brethel-Haurwitz wanted to understand the connection between this trait and empathy, specifically empathy for distress emotions. Using fMRI scans, Brethel-Haurwitz and colleagues from Georgetown University discovered

How the brain creates the subjective experience of time

Space and time are closely related — not just in physics, but also in the brain. This intimate connection becomes clearer when we take a look at how our brains form episodic memories. Episodic memories are autobiographical memories — that is, memories about specific events that happened to someone at a specific point in time